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It looks like xargs reads input lines from stdin, even when it is already running maximum number of process that it can run.

Here is an example:

#!/bin/bash
function xTrigger()
{
   for ii in `seq 1 100`; do echo $ii; sleep 2; done
}
function xRunner()
{
   sleep 10;
   echo $1;
}
export -f xTrigger
export -f xRunner
bash -c "xTrigger" | xargs -n 1 -P 1 -i bash -c "xRunner {}"

20 seconds after starting above process, I killall xTrigger, so but xargs has buffered everything xTrigger printed, so xRunner continued to print 1..10. What I want is for it to print only 1,2

Is there anyway by which we can change this behaviour and get xargs to read from stdin only when it wants to start a new command, so that xTrigger would wait at the echo statement until xargs reads from it? My stdin has very dynamic content so this would be very useful.

Trying to stick to xargs just because it would be stable and elegent. Want to write extra code only if there is no easy way of doing it with xargs.

Thanks for all your help!

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1  
bash: xTrigger: command not found - your function isn't passed to the subshell, is it? The same with xRunner. Why don't you do xTrigger | xargs -n 1 -P 1 -i xRunner? And where we at it: Backticks are deprecated, use $(...) instead, because it's better readable, fontindependtly, and easy to nest. And, last: for ii in {1..100} is better, because it is builtin and doesn't need the external program seq. While I don't know the answer to your main question, but guess: No, won't fly. How should it? By parameter? By code-modification and recompiling? Isn't the cache a central idea of xargs? – user unknown Feb 22 '11 at 7:35
    
xTrigger | xargs -n 1 -P 1 -i xRunner doesn't work too, because the pipe starts the subshell, does it? So you need 2 scripts, xTrigger.sh and xRunner.sh, and need it anyway, because you can't stop a function with killall - can you? – user unknown Feb 22 '11 at 7:51
    
sorry I forgot a couple of lines. Edited code to fix it. those are processes, using processes so that we can kill them, and xargs can't start a process, so we have to use bash -c 'functionname' – Sahas Feb 22 '11 at 8:15
    
oops. I meant xargs can't start a function – Sahas Feb 22 '11 at 8:42
    
xargs has no way of knowing that the process on the left has died if the process on the right is blocking. – Dennis Williamson Feb 22 '11 at 16:30

Don't you have to kill the Bash PID of xTrigger()?

bash -c "echo $$; xTrigger" | xargs -n 1 -P 1 bash -c 'xRunner "$@"' _
kill -HUP <PID>
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On my system, xargs will by default halt if one of the jobs it is running exits with a non-zero return code. Therefore, you should be sending the signal to the bash pid that is running XRunner.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Got xTrigger to to generate next trigger only when there are no 'bash -c xRunner' jobs running. Works great now:

#!/bin/bash
function xTrigger()
{
   for ii in `seq 1 100`; do 
      echo $ii; 
      while [[ $(psgrep xRunner|grep -v xargs|wc -l) -ge 1 ]]; do
         sleep 2; 
      done
   done
}
function xRunner()
{
   sleep 10;
   echo $1;
}
export -f xTrigger
export -f xRunner
bash -c "xTrigger" | xargs -n 1 -P 1 -i bash -c "xRunner {}"
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