Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am implementing the facebook "Like" button. works all fine with

    <fb:like 
href="http://www.thismydomain123.com/IlikeThisPage.php?id=123" 
layout="standard" 
show_faces="false" 
width="450" 
action="like" 
colorscheme="light" />  

But having sharable content placed in a secured folder, won't do (accessing the folder directly would prompt "The http://www.thismydomain123.com at mySecureFolder requires a username and password..."):

<fb:like 
href="http://www.parisgallery.com/mySecureFolder/IlikeThisPage.php?id=123" 
layout="standard" 
show_faces="false" 
width="450" 
action="like" 
colorscheme="light" />  

So, is there a way to authenticate or any other preferable solution for this?

thanks a lot,
Steilflug

share|improve this question
    
What's the use of the "mySecureFolder" ? I don't understand why you want to "like" something that's not public ? –  dwarfy May 16 '11 at 17:24

1 Answer 1

In short, no there is not a solution that would both work and be secure. When a user clicks the 'like' button on a page, Facebook pings your page from its own servers in order to get images and text to display on your news feed (see Why does Facebook appear in my server logs?). The trick is to let Facebook pings in but block all other traffic that isn't authenticated.

Facebook pings using the user agent facebookexternalhit/1.0 (+http://www.facebook.com/externalhit_uatext.php). If you aren't too concerned about security you could allow access to your pages for any agent using that user agent string. It's important to note, however, that this is entirely insecure because any agent can change their user agent string on their own accord. Facebook also offers no guarantee that their user agent string won't change so this method could stop working at any moment.

Another option would be to simply allow anyone on a Facebook IP address access without authentication. This would work assuming Facebook is consistent about the IPs that it pings from, but again there is no guarantee on this front. This is also potentially insecure if you only want some Facebook features and/or employees to be able to see your content without validation or if Facebook releases their ownership of those IP blocks.

I suppose your real problem is that you're trying to have content that is at the same time both protected and sharable which is a sort of a paradox. The only true solution to this problem would be to allow anyone read access to your content.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, good answer. What's the point of securing content that is going to be shared? And if security is important still, maybe use a different method to secure it (like Facebook Login). –  Jimmy Sawczuk May 15 '11 at 0:58
    
Thanks for the great answer. @Jimmy Sawczuk - Most content on Facebook needs the user to be logged in, yet you can still like that secured content. If Facebook wasn't the one controlling the likes, they would be facing the same problem faced by the OP. I understand why this isn't possible, but wanting that functionality is very reasonable. I'm also curious how using Facebook Login would help circumvent this problem?(not that I don't think it's possible, just want to know how?) –  Lumpy May 17 '11 at 16:36
    
"What's the point of securing content that is going to be shared?" - to drive traffic/awareness to content. For example, think of an investing site that has content for tips about investing. Well, maybe to get the content it requires you create a free account. You may read something you want to share with others. Others should be able to get at the content, once they are registered with the site. Can think of lots of scenarios where sites are free for registration, but require an authenticated user to actually read the content. –  Brian Jul 21 '11 at 21:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.