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I am a complete newbie to Python, and I'm stuck with a regex problem. I'm trying to remove the line break character at the end of each line in a text file, but only if it follows a lowercase letter, i.e. [a-z]. If the end of the line ends in a lower case letter, I want to replace the line break/newline character with a space.

This is what I've got so far:

import re
import sys

textout = open("output.txt","w")
textblock = open(sys.argv[1]).read()
textout.write(re.sub("[a-z]\z","[a-z] ", textblock, re.MULTILINE) )
textout.close()
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If there is no $ and no ^ in a RE, there is no need of tag re.MULTILINE –  eyquem Feb 22 '11 at 11:09
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3 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Try

re.sub(r"(?<=[a-z])\r?\n"," ", textblock)

\Z only matches at the end of the string, after the last linebreak, so it's definitely not what you need here. \z is not recognized by the Python regex engine.

(?<=[a-z]) is a positive lookbehind assertion that checks if the character before the current position is a lowercase ASCII character. Only then the regex engine will try to match a line break.

Also, always use raw strings with regexes. Makes backslashes easier to handle.

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You're right! ;) –  YOU Feb 22 '11 at 7:32
1  
I would replace \r?\n with [\r\n]+ to also hit single \r. –  ThiefMaster Feb 22 '11 at 7:32
    
@ThiefMaster, It will also strip blank lines, btw –  YOU Feb 22 '11 at 7:34
    
@ThiefMaster: Are there still Macs around that use \r, and does Python run on them? I thought Apple gave up the \r line endings with OS X, but I may be entirely wrong about this. –  Tim Pietzcker Feb 22 '11 at 7:34
    
Hopefully not.. but you can never know what crappy files are around - there are way too many files containing a mix of \n and \r\n so I'd expect some \r files to still exist, too. –  ThiefMaster Feb 22 '11 at 8:36
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my point was that avoiding using positive lookbehind might make the code more readable

OK. Though, personally, I don't find it's less readable. It's a matter of taste.

In your EDIT:

  • First, (?m) is not necessary since for line in ifp: selects one line at a time and so there is only one newline at the end of each line's string

  • Secondly, $ as it is placed, has no utility because it will always match the end of the string line.

Any way, adopting your point of view, I found two manners to avoid the lookbehind assertion:

with open(sys.argv[1]) as ifp:
    with open("output.txt", "w") as ofp:
        for line in ifp:
            ante_newline,lower_last = re.match('(.*?([a-z])?$)',line).groups()
            ofp.write(ante_newline+' ' if lower_last else line)

and

with open(sys.argv[1]) as ifp:
    with open("output.txt", "w") as ofp:
        for line in ifp:
            ofp.write(line.strip('\r\n')+' ' if re.search('[a-z]$',line) else line)

the second one is better: only one line , a simple matching to test, no need of groups(), naturally logic

EDIT: oh I realize that this second code is simply your first code rewritten in one line, Longair

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Just as an alternative answer, although it takes more lines, I think the following may be clearer since the regular expression is simpler:

import re
import sys

with open(sys.argv[1]) as ifp:
    with open("output.txt", "w") as ofp:
        for line in ifp:
            if re.search('[a-z]$',line):
                ofp.write(line.rstrip("\n\r")+" ")
            else:
                ofp.write(line)

... and that avoids loading the whole file into a string. If you want to use fewer lines, but still avoid postive lookbehind, you could do:

import re
import sys

with open(sys.argv[1]) as ifp:
    with open("output.txt", "w") as ofp:
        for line in ifp:
            ofp.write(re.sub('(?m)([a-z])[\r\n]+$','\\1 ',line))

The parts of that regular expression are:

  • (?m) [turn on multiline matching]
  • ([a-z]) [match a single lower case character as the first group]
  • [\r\n]+ [match one or more of carriage returns or newlines, to cover \n, \r\n and \r]
  • $ [match the end of the string]

... and if that matches line, the lowercase letter and line ending are replaced by \\1, which will the lower case letter followed by a space.

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One line ofp.write(re.sub("(?<=[a-z])(\n|\r\n?)"," ",line) instead of four lines –  eyquem Feb 22 '11 at 9:08
    
@eyquem: sure, but my point was that avoiding using positive lookbehind might make the code more readable, and that three extra lines might be worth it for that... Well, I'll add another version anyway. –  Mark Longair Feb 22 '11 at 9:27
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