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How would you initialise a static Map in Java?

Method one: Static initializer
Method two: instance initialiser (anonymous subclass) or some other method?

What are the pros and cons of each?

Here is an example illustrating two methods:

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class Test {
    private static final Map<Integer, String> myMap = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
    static {
        myMap.put(1, "one");
        myMap.put(2, "two");
    }

    private static final Map<Integer, String> myMap2 = new HashMap<Integer, String>(){
        {
            put(1, "one");
            put(2, "two");
        }
    };
}
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20 Answers 20

up vote 409 down vote accepted

The instance initialiser is just syntactic sugar in this case, right? I don't see why you need an extra anonymous class just to initialize. And it won't work if the class being created is final.

You can create an immutable map using a static initialiser too:

public class Test {
    private static final Map<Integer, String> myMap;
    static {
        Map<Integer, String> aMap = ....;
        aMap.put(1, "one");
        aMap.put(2, "two");
        myMap = Collections.unmodifiableMap(aMap);
    }
}

Edit: This answer has become a vote magnet, but I will stop here and change it into a community wiki

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1  
This is the idiom I've used for years and I've never had anyone bat an eye at it. I do the same for unmodifiable constant Sets and Lists too. –  jasonmp85 Jun 3 '10 at 8:22
    
How would I handle a HashMap<String, String> with a String key. The Map object doesn't allow me to have a String key so I can't use unmodifiableMap(). I guess casting to a HashMap would defeat the purpose as well. Any ideas? –  Luke May 4 '11 at 14:36
10  
@Luke I seriously doubt that Android has such a limitation. It makes no sense at all. A quick search found this question here (and many others) which seems to imply you can use a String key for a Map object in Android. –  mluisbrown May 25 '11 at 17:38
5  
So no one else bothers to investigate, I can confirm there's no problem with using a String key for a Map object on Android. –  Jordan Jan 3 '12 at 22:13
3  
Jordan: it is an old topic now but I suspect @Luke was trying to use a string as a key in a map that had a different key type, e.g. Map<Integer, String>. –  Miserable Variable Jan 3 '12 at 23:53
show 2 more comments

I like the Guava way of initialising a static, immutable map:

static final Map<Integer, String> MY_MAP = ImmutableMap.of(
        1, "one",
        2, "two"
);

As you can see, it's very concise (because of the convenient factory methods in ImmutableMap).

Edit: If you want the map to have more than 5 entries, you can no longer use ImmutableMap.of(). Instead, try ImmutableMap.builder() along these lines:

static final Map<Integer, String> MY_MAP = ImmutableMap.<Integer, String>builder()
    .put(1, "one")
    .put(2, "two")
    // ... 
    .put(15, "fifteen")
    .build();

To learn more about the benefits of Guava's immutable collection utilities, see Immutable Collections Explained in Guava User Guide.

(A subset of) Guava used to be called Google Collections. If you aren't using this library in your Java project yet, I strongly recommend trying it out! Guava has quickly become one of the most popular and useful free 3rd party libs for Java, as fellow SO users agree. (If you are new to it, there are some excellent learning resources behind that link.)

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8  
Seems like our fellow SO admins have deleted the venerable "Most useful free third party Java libraries" question to which I linked. :( Damn them. –  Jonik Jan 27 '12 at 10:11
1  
I agree, this is the nicest way of initializing a constant map. Not only more readable but also since Collections.unmodifiableMap returns a read-only view of the underlying map (that still can be modified). –  crunchdog May 3 '12 at 7:29
2  
I can now see deleted questions (with 10k+ rep), so here's a copy of 'Most useful free third-party Java libraries'. It's only the first page, but at least you can find the Guava resources mentioned above. –  Jonik Feb 27 '13 at 15:06
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I would use:

public class Test {
    private static final Map<Integer, String> MY_MAP = createMap();

    private static Map<Integer, String> createMap() {
        Map<Integer, String> result = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
        result.put(1, "one");
        result.put(2, "two");
        return Collections.unmodifiableMap(result);
    }
}
  1. it avoids anonymous class, which I personally consider to be a bad style, and avoid
  2. it makes creation of map more explicit
  3. it makes map unmodifiable
  4. as MY_MAP is constant, I would name it like constant
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2  
+1 using a method seems so obvious now; I wish I had mentioned it in my answer as well. –  eljenso Feb 4 '09 at 8:23
    
Of the pure JDK options (no libs), I like this the most, because map definition is clearly linked to its initialisation. Also agreed on constant naming. –  Jonik Dec 29 '13 at 14:31
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Java 5 provides this more compact syntax:

static final Map<String , String> FLAVORS = new HashMap<String , String>() {{
    put("Up",    "Down");
    put("Charm", "Strange");
    put("Top",   "Bottom");
}};
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14  
That technique is called double brace initialization: stackoverflow.com/questions/1372113/… It's not a special Java 5 syntax, it's just a trick with an anonymous class with an instance initializer. –  Jesper Jun 3 '10 at 8:35
11  
Quick question regarding the double brace initialization: When doing this, Eclipse issues a Warning about a missing Serial ID. On one hand, I don't see why a Serial ID would be needed in this specific case, but on the other hand, I usually don't like supressing warnings. What are your thoughts on this? –  nbarraille Nov 18 '11 at 1:08
3  
@nbarraille That's because HashMap implements Serializable. Since you actually create a subclass of HashMap using this "trick", you implicitly creating a Serializable class. And for this you should supply a serialUID. –  noone Oct 29 '13 at 22:43
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One advantage to the second method is that you can wrap it with Collections.unmodifiableMap() to guarantee that nothing is going to update the collection later:

private static final Map<Integer, String> CONSTANT_MAP = 
    Collections.unmodifiableMap(new HashMap<Integer, String>() {{ 
        put(1, "one");
        put(2, "two");
    }});

 // later on...

 CONSTANT_MAP.put(3, "three"); // going to throw an exception!
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2  
Can't you easily do this in the first method by moving the new operator into the static {} block and wrapping it? –  Patrick Feb 3 '09 at 20:30
1  
I'd move the constructor call into the static initialised anyway. Anything else just looks odd. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 3 '09 at 21:25
1  
any idea what performance hit there might be from using an anonymous class as opposed to a concrete class? –  Kip Dec 10 '09 at 15:49
    
Your answer wins, sir. –  cwash Jan 13 '12 at 0:37
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I would never create an anonymous subclass in this situation. Static initializers work equally well, if you would like to make the map unmodifiable for example:

private static final Map<Integer, String> MY_MAP;
static
{
	Map<Integer, String>tempMap = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
	tempMap.put(1, "one");
	tempMap.put(2, "two");
	MY_MAP = Collections.unmodifiableMap(tempMap);
}
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In which situation would you use an anonymous subclass to initialise a hashmap then? –  dogbane Feb 3 '09 at 16:01
4  
Never to initialize a Collection. –  eljenso Feb 4 '09 at 8:10
    
Could you explain why using a static initializer is a better choice than creating an anonymous subclass? –  leba-lev Jan 24 '12 at 14:27
2  
@rookie There are several reasons given in other answers favoring the static init. The goal here is to initialize, so why bring in the subclassing, except maybe to save a few keystrokes? (If you want to save on keystrokes, Java is definitely not a good choice as a programming language.) One rule of thumb I use when programming in Java is: subclass as little as possible (and never when it can be reasonably avoided). –  eljenso Jan 26 '12 at 14:14
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Maybe it's interesting to check out Google Collections, e.g. the videos that they have on their page. They provide various ways to initialize maps and sets, and provide immutable collections as well.

Update: This library is now named Guava.

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2  
I love Google collections. –  Miserable Variable Feb 5 '09 at 12:39
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In GS Collections, all of the following would work:

import java.util.Map;

import com.gs.collections.api.map.ImmutableMap;
import com.gs.collections.api.map.MutableMap;
import com.gs.collections.impl.factory.Maps;

public class StaticMapsTest
{
    private static final Map<Integer, String> MAP =
        Maps.mutable.of(1, "one", 2, "two");

    private static final MutableMap<Integer, String> MUTABLE_MAP =
       Maps.mutable.of(1, "one", 2, "two");


    private static final MutableMap<Integer, String> UNMODIFIABLE_MAP =
        Maps.mutable.of(1, "one", 2, "two").asUnmodifiable();


    private static final MutableMap<Integer, String> SYNCHRONIZED_MAP =
        Maps.mutable.of(1, "one", 2, "two").asSynchronized();


    private static final ImmutableMap<Integer, String> IMMUTABLE_MAP =
        Maps.mutable.of(1, "one", 2, "two").toImmutable();


    private static final ImmutableMap<Integer, String> IMMUTABLE_MAP2 =
        Maps.immutable.of(1, "one", 2, "two");
}
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i like anonymous class its easy to deal with it

public static final Map<?, ?> numbers = Collections.unmodifiableMap(new HashMap<Integer, String>() {
    {
        put(1, "some value");
                    //rest of code here
    }
});
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public class Test {
    private static final Map<Integer, String> myMap;
    static {
        Map<Integer, String> aMap = ....;
        aMap.put(1, "one");
        aMap.put(2, "two");
        myMap = Collections.unmodifiableMap(aMap);
    }
}

If we declare more than one constant then that code will be written in static block and that is hard to maintain in future. So it is better to use anonymous class.

public class Test {

    public static final Map numbers = Collections.unmodifiableMap(new HashMap(2, 1.0f){
        {
            put(1, "one");
            put(2, "two");
        }
    });
}

And it is suggested to used unmodifiableMap for constants other wise it can't be treated as constant.

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I could strongly suggest the "double brace initialization" style over static block style.

Someone may comment that they don't like anonymous class, overhead, performance, etc.

But that I more consider is the code readability and maintainability. In this point of view, I stand a double brace is a better code style rather then static method.

  1. The elements are nested and inline.
  2. It is more OO, not procedural.
  3. the performance impact is really small and could be ignored.
  4. Better IDE outline support (rather then many anonymous static{} block)
  5. You saved few lines of comment to bring them relationship.
  6. Prevent possible element leak/instance lead of uninitialized object from exception and bytecode optimizer.
  7. No worry about the order of execution of static block.

In addition, it you aware the GC of the anonymous class, you can always convert it to a normal HashMap by using new HashMap(Map map).

You can do this until you faced another problem. If you do, you should use complete another coding style (e.g. no static, factory class) for it.

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The anonymous class you're creating works well. However you should be aware that this is an inner class and as such, it'll contain a reference to the surrounding class instance. So you'll find you can't do certain things with it (using XStream for one). You'll get some very strange errors.

Having said that, so long as you're aware then this approach is fine. I use it most of the time for initialising all sorts of collections in a concise fashion.

EDIT: Pointed out correctly in the comments that this is a static class. Obviously I didn't read this closely enough. However my comments do still apply to anonymous inner classes.

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2  
In this particular case it's static, so no outer instance. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 3 '09 at 21:27
    
Arguably XStream shouldn't be trying to serialize stuff like this (it's static. Why would you need to serialize a static variable?) –  jasonmp85 Jun 3 '10 at 8:26
    
See Tom's comment above and my edit. –  Brian Agnew Jun 3 '10 at 16:38
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I do not like Static initializer syntax and I'm not convinced to anonymous subclasses. Generally, I agree with all cons of using Static initializers and all cons of using anonymous subclasses that were mentioned in previus answers. On the other hand - pros presented in these posts are not enough for me. I prefer to use static initialization method:

public class MyClass {
    private static final Map<Integer, String> myMap = prepareMap();

    private static Map<Integer, String> prepareMap() {
        Map<Integer, String> hashMap = new HashMap<>();
        hashMap.put(1, "one");
        hashMap.put(2, "two");

        return hashMap;
    }
}
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If you want something terse and relatively safe, you can just shift compile-time type checking to run-time:

static final Map<String, Integer> map = MapUtils.unmodifiableMap(
    String.class, Integer.class,
    "cat",  4,
    "dog",  2,
    "frog", 17
);

This implementation should catch any errors:

import java.util.HashMap;

public abstract class MapUtils
{
    private MapUtils() { }

    public static <K, V> HashMap<K, V> unmodifiableMap(
            Class<? extends K> keyClazz,
            Class<? extends V> valClazz,
            Object...keyValues)
    {
        return Collections.<K, V>unmodifiableMap(makeMap(
            keyClazz,
            valClazz,
            keyValues));
    }

    public static <K, V> HashMap<K, V> makeMap(
            Class<? extends K> keyClazz,
            Class<? extends V> valClazz,
            Object...keyValues)
    {
        if (keyValues.length % 2 != 0)
        {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(
                    "'keyValues' was formatted incorrectly!  "
                  + "(Expected an even length, but found '" + keyValues.length + "')");
        }

        HashMap<K, V> result = new HashMap<K, V>(keyValues.length / 2);

        for (int i = 0; i < keyValues.length;)
        {
            K key = cast(keyClazz, keyValues[i], i);
            ++i;
            V val = cast(valClazz, keyValues[i], i);
            ++i;
            result.put(key, val);
        }

        return result;
    }

    private static <T> T cast(Class<? extends T> clazz, Object object, int i)
    {
        try
        {
            return clazz.cast(object);
        }
        catch (ClassCastException e)
        {
            String objectName = (i % 2 == 0) ? "Key" : "Value";
            String format = "%s at index %d ('%s') wasn't assignable to type '%s'";
            throw new IllegalArgumentException(String.format(format, objectName, i, object.toString(), clazz.getSimpleName()), e);
        }
    }
}
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If you can use a String representation of your data this is an option too in Java 8:

static Map<Integer, String> map = Stream.of( "1=one",
                                             "2=two" )
                                        .collect( Collectors.toMap( k -> Integer.parseInt(k.split("=")[0]), v -> v.split("=")[1] ) );
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The second method could invoke protected methods if needed. This can be useful for initializing classes which are immutable after construction.

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I like the anonymous class syntax; it's just less code. However, one major con I have found is that you won't be able to serialize that object via remoting. You will get an exception about not being able to find the anonymous class on the remote side.

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You could create the map using the double-brace idiom, and then copy it. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 3 '09 at 21:26
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I've done something a bit different. Not the best, but it works for me. Maybe it could be "genericized".

private static final Object[][] ENTRIES =
{
  {new Integer(1), "one"},
  {new Integer(2), "two"},
};
private static final Map myMap = newMap(ENTRIES);

private static Map newMap(Object[][] entries)
{
  Map map = new HashMap();

  for (int x = 0; x < entries.length; x++)
  {
    Object[] entry = entries[x];

    map.put(entry[0], entry[1]);
  }

  return map;
}
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I like the little code needed to initialize maps in this way –  eliocs Sep 27 '13 at 11:36
    
The problem with this approach is that it is not type-safe at all (and if you are using Java, you want type safety). You can put any kind of objects as keys and values. It only really works for a Map<Object, Object> (though one could use an analogous approach with an String[][] for Map<String,String> and similar for other Map<T,T>. It doesn't work for Maps where the key-type is different from the value type. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jan 29 at 20:31
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Now that Java 8 is out, this question warrants revisiting. I took a stab at it -- looks like maybe you can exploit lambda expression syntax to get a pretty nice and concise (but type-safe) map literal syntax that looks like this:

        Map<String,Object> myMap = hashMap(
                bob -> 5,
                TheGimp -> 8,
                incredibleKoolAid -> "James Taylor",
                heyArnold -> new Date()
        );

        Map<String,Integer> typesafeMap = treeMap(
                a -> 5,
                bee -> 8,
                sea -> 13
                deep -> 21
        );

Untested sample code at https://gist.github.com/galdosd/10823529 Would be curious on the opinions of others on this (it's mildly evil...)

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Note: Turns out, after actually trying it later... the above does not actually work. I tried it with a few different javac flags and was unable to get the name used for the parameter to be retained. –  Domingo Ignacio May 7 at 20:21
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I prefer using a static initializer to avoid generating anonymous classes (which would have no further purpose), so I'll list tips initializing with a static initializer. All listed solutions / tips are type-safe.

Note: The question doesn't say anything about making the map unmodifiable, so I will leave that out, but know that it can easily be done with Collections.unmodifiableMap(map).

First tip

The 1st tip is that you can make a local reference to the map and you can name it SHORT:

private static final Map<Integer, String> myMap = new HashMap<>();
static {
    final Map<Integer, String> m = myMap; // Use short name!
    m.put(1, "one");
    m.put(2, "two");
    m.put(3, "three");
}

Second tip

The 2nd tip is that you can create a helper method to add entries; you can also make this helper method public if you want to:

private static final Map<Integer, String> myMap2 = new HashMap<>();
static {
    p(1, "one"); // Calling the helper method.
    p(2, "two");
    p(3, "three");
}

private static void p(Integer k, String v) {
    myMap2.put(k, v);
}

The helper method here is not re-usable though because it can only add elements to myMap2. To make it re-usable, we could make the map itself a parameter of the helper method, but then initialization code would not be any shorter.

Third tip

The 3rd tip is that you can create a re-usable builder-like helper class with the populating functionality. This is really a simple, 10-line helper class which is type-safe:

public class Test {
    private static final Map<Integer, String> myMap3 = new HashMap<>();
    static {
        new B<>(myMap3)   // Instantiating the helper class with our map
            .p(1, "one")
            .p(2, "two")
            .p(3, "three");
    }
}

class B<K, V> {
    private final Map<K, V> m;

    public B(Map<K, V> m) {
        this.m = m;
    }

    public B<K, V> p(K k, V v) {
        m.put(k, v);
        return this; // Return this for chaining
    }
}
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