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This will no doubt be a stupid question, and we can all laugh about how stupid it is when the answer points out the glaring simplicity of it all, but being firmly indoctrinated in the art of relational databases I can't seem to get my head entirely around mongodb - no matter how many articles I read or videos I watch.

Here's my situation. I have a project which potentially will have millions of users. Core features:

  • Have a list of users of 4 different types
  • One type of these users can create events
  • Other user types can apply to be perform at the event (there is then a request system between the applying party and organising party to agree upon terms)
  • Other user types can attend the event
  • All user types can follow the event
  • Every user can upload an unlimited amount of images to their "gallery"

Now I would instantly know how to go about normalising a MySQL database and joining queries to get the data I require, but what about mongodb?

Since all of this information is relational to the users do I just create a single collection for users? For each user do I create a document? Does this document store all details of events, requests and images relevent to that user - or just some sort of id for these things that I then cross reference? If not wouldn't this replicate a lot of data - i.e. if I had to replicate all event data for every user following/attending/performing at that event and put it in that users document (I'm sure this isn't the case - but without joins how do I get "join" the user and all event data if events are stored in another collection?). What about images? A users document can be 16mb - but if I allow unlimited images and everything related to the user was stored in a single document then the images alone could grow larger than a single document?

I'm sure that I'm not understanding pretty vital to understanding mongodb - enlighten me!

Thanks.

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you can either embed or reference other models as far as I know. –  Joseph Le Brech Feb 22 '11 at 9:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use 2 different User & Event collection to design your app. Something like this

UserDocument Collection
    -Type
    -Details    

EventDocument Collection
    -Created By
    -EventDetail
    -AppliedUsers
         -"User A",User B"
    -AttendingUsers
         -"User C",User D"
    -FollowingUsers
         -"User E",User F"

Event documet got all the userid's of applied, attending & following users using Dbref.

One more approach is store frequently accessed user document fields along with the DBref objects. This avoids the unnecessary hits to the db and storing redundant (complete user data) data in the document. something like

 EventDocument Collection
    -Created By
    -EventDetail
    -AppliedUsers
         -"User"
             - Name
             - XXX
             - DbRef to User A
    -AttendingUsers
         -"User"
             - Name
             - XXX
             - DbRef to User B

    -FollowingUsers
         -"User"
             - Name
             - XXX
             - DbRef to User C

         -"User"
             - Name
             - XXX
             - DbRef to User D

For images you can use GridFs. This will split the large files in to smaller chunks.

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Good solution, but in my opinion better always start from embedding. With your schema for example you can quickly show users that have assigned events, because you need to iterate though all users. –  Andrew Orsich Feb 22 '11 at 9:42
    
@Bugai13, but we can avoid this by storing frequently accesing user fields along with the DBRef. Check my edit –  RameshVel Feb 22 '11 at 9:51
    
Yeah, but it another big question about how to better denormalize database to fit some needs. –  Andrew Orsich Feb 22 '11 at 9:58
    
Aha yes, this seems like a good solution. I now understand the basics of how mongodb works! I think I now need to look up best practice in mongodb normalisation/denomalisation. Thanks! –  user623520 Feb 22 '11 at 10:12

Initially i suggest to create only UserDocument and embed all event related collection inside of user, in the future you will see if events will be big collection(more that mongodb limit 4mb) you will move it into separate collection. As for images look at mongodb gridFs feature, it allow you to store file with any size. In user document you could store only collection of fileId.

When you start to design document databe schema always start from embedding evething, later you will see what you need move into separate collection. In you case if you will need for example show list of all events you can't do it easy, because you need to load each user and get embeded collection of events, in such situation need to move events in separate collection.

Update:

Because you need to refernce to the event from any user document, you need to move event into separate collection, because it's always bad to reference to the embedded collections.

So after disscussions with myself, seems to me that following scheme should fit you need:

UserDocument Collection
    -UserId
    -Type
    -Details    
    -Events(EventId)
    -AppliedEvents
    -AttendingEvents
    -Files(it's not actual files it just references to gridFs filess)

EventDocument Collection
    -EventId
    -EventDetail   
    -FollowingUsers

I've moved almost all into UserDocument, because User is a 'strong' entity and you will work with user more than with event(it seems so for me).

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Thanks, this also seems like a good solution. Can I ask why followingusers is in the event document and applied and ettending is in user document? - Thanks for clarifying how files would work! –  user623520 Feb 22 '11 at 10:18
    
@Colin: Following users in event document because i suppose that you need show event and users that follow the event(it easy task if following user inside of event), but for the applied events i suppose you shoud show user and his applied events(it's easy when applied events inside of user). –  Andrew Orsich Feb 22 '11 at 10:43
    
the mongodb limit of 4MB (was raised to 16MB) is for documents, not collections. And 16MB is way too big to worry about it unless you store several novels inside one document. –  TheBronx Oct 18 '13 at 8:05

You should follow the suggestions that@Bugai13 and @Ramesh Vel suggested regarding the design of your DB, images and DBRefs. I just wanted to clarify a couple of things.

If not wouldn't this replicate a lot of data - i.e. if I had to replicate all event data for every user following/attending/performing at that event and put it in that users document

People came up with normalisation in relational databases at a time when storage was expensive - hence splitting data in multiple data and reconstructing them using joins. Now that storage is relatively very cheap, if you need performance, having repetition of data is not frowned upon at all. It does depend on the application, however, your query pattern, the amount of data you're storing and speed of reads/writes you're after. But, you'll say, won't more writes (since no normalisation) lead to worse performance? Not necessarily, depends on the app. If you're worried about this, look at sharding (for MongoDB: http://www.mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Sharding+Introduction).

but without joins how do I get "join" the user and all event data if events are stored in another collection?

Also note that, as far as I understand (happy to be corrected on this), there isn't a 'join' operation in MongoDB. This happends on just some drivers. As the docs say here :

DBRef's have the advantage of allowing optional automatic client-side dereferencing with some drivers

Notice that dereferencing happens client-side only, and it happens only for 'some' drivers. As far as I gather, PHP does but the Java driver doesn't - you would have to handle the join at the application level by fetching the two result sets from the separate collections and join them by hand, despite the DBRef.

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1  
Dbref just say that it reference to another document an nothing else. There are no joins in mongodb, instead of joins we can create new denormalized documents with 'joined information'. –  Andrew Orsich Feb 22 '11 at 10:03
    
Yes thanks for clarifying - that is very important to remember. –  user623520 Feb 22 '11 at 10:13
    
Reading "Embed v's reference" section of mongodb.org/display/DOCS/Schema+Design I think this touches upon what you are saying - embedding is quicker than referencing. "Thus if we were iterating 1,000 students, looking up one reference per student would be quite slow". So if the data I have to embed is very large (events will have loads of data associated to them and will be displayed in full a lot of the time), it probably makes more sense to reference this. But if the whole point of using mongodb is for performance then it probably makes more sense to use a relational database? –  user623520 Feb 22 '11 at 10:34
    
MongoDB is not a drop-in replacement for RDBMSs. RBMSs work well for most problems. If your problem is solved well with an RDBMS, go with that. However, if you see some advantages with MongoDB, e.g. using MapReduce for batch processing of some things or you feel embedding is better for your app, go with MongoDB. Some claim that MongoDB is faster in some/many cases, but I won't go into that, there are good and bad evaluations on the Web about this. Note that in an RDBMS you need indexes (=space on disk and in RAM) to do the joins fast, so the data replication is not that bad a thing in MongoDB. –  Lucas Zamboulis Feb 22 '11 at 10:46

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