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I would like to start with an empty hash, and then insert hash of hashes of the same kind into the hash.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %h = {};

$h{"1"} => {
    a => -1,
    b => -1,
    c => [
    {
        d => -1,
        e => -1,
    },
    ],
};

However this gives

Useless use of hash element in void context at ./hash.pl line 8.
Useless use of anonymous hash ({}) in void context at ./hash.pl line 8.
Reference found where even-sized list expected at ./hash.pl line 6.

It is sort of a database I would like to make, where I can insert the delete structures of the $h{"1"} kind.

Any ideas how to do this?

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7  
Yo, I heard u like hashes so I put a hash in yo hash so u can lookup while you lookup. –  BoltClock Feb 22 '11 at 13:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

To initialize a hash you use %h = ().
{} is a reference to an empty anonymous hash. Try this:

my %h = ();

$h{"1"} = {
    a => -1,
    b => -1,
    c => [{
        d => -1,
        e => -1,
    }],
};
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+1 that is they way to go –  Thariama Feb 22 '11 at 9:59
    
I stumbled over these complex hashes when I tried to read XML with the XML:Simple Module. Well the reading is simple but addressing the resulting hashes and arrays gives me a headache (I am a PERL beginner). - How do you address the element 'd' in the example above? - What are ways to loop over all these values? Thanks, Mika –  user628446 Feb 22 '11 at 15:22
1  
Mika, open a new question proper instead of attaching questions in the comments section. –  daxim Feb 22 '11 at 17:19
    
Mika, you would get the 'd' element with $h{1}{c}[0]{d} which would get you the value -1. As daxim says, open a new question if you want a more detailed answer. –  friedo Feb 22 '11 at 17:42

NOTE: References are always scalar as they contain address (kind of to think neatly)

When you create a nested data structure just remember that in perl we don't have to worry about how the space is allocated, how much space is allocated. It's pretty neat to handle anonymous storage of it's own.

But, Always remember the thumb rules for creating such storage like this,

To create an anonymous array, use square brackets instead of parentheses:

$ra = [ ];

To create an anonymous hash, use braces instead of square brackets:

$rh = { };

And that's all there is.

Now, What you wrote was something like this,

my %h={};

You are essentially creating a hash and initializing it with a reference which is a scalar.

That's why your program complained about this,

Just remove that line and rewrite your code like this,

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $h={"1" => {
            a => -1,
            b => -1,
            c => [
                 {
                   d => -1,
                   e => -1,
                 },
                 ],
              }
};

Perl will take care of the rest.. Enjoy Perl :) :)

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