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I want to know what the difference is between null and undefined in JavaScript.

Provide in your answer the best link that relates to this topic in JavaScript.

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possible duplicate of Why is there a null value in JavaScript? –  outis Jan 18 '12 at 11:39
    
2  
@DanDascalescu this question was asked first –  Mina Gabriel Apr 16 at 12:32
1  
I always thought: null is you set it to empty, undefined it's empty because it has not been set. Or null is empty on purpose, while undefined is still empty. Basically it shows intent. –  Muhammad Umer Sep 12 at 16:20
    

14 Answers 14

up vote 189 down vote accepted

In JavaScript, undefined means a variable has been declared but has not yet been assigned a value, such as:

 var TestVar;
 alert(TestVar); //shows undefined
 alert(typeof TestVar); //shows undefined

null is an assignment value. It can be assigned to a variable as a representation of no value:

 var TestVar = null;
 alert(TestVar); //shows null
 alert(typeof TestVar); //shows object

From the preceding examples, it is clear that undefined and null are two distinct types: undefined is a type itself (undefined) while null is an object.

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35  
Quote from the book Professional JS For Web Developers (Wrox): "You may wonder why the typeof operator returns 'object' for a value that is null. This was actually an error in the original JavaScript implementation that was then copied in ECMAScript. Today, it is rationalized that null is considered a placeholder for an object, even though, technically, it is a primitive value." –  Diego Deberdt Nov 3 '11 at 14:54
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the variable might as well not be defined at all. for example: console.log(typeof(abc)); undefined –  Nir O. May 8 '12 at 21:12
4  
The comment from Nir O. is very important. If I want to have a variable that has no value in the beginning, I write "... = null", eg "myvar = null". This way - when I mistype "if (myxar == null) {...}" - the if block is not executed. I don't have this advantage with undefined: myvar = undefined; myvar = 4; if (typeof myxar == "undefined") { ...} –  Wolfgang Adamec Sep 26 '12 at 7:29
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@Wolfgang Adamec, error-free programming is not about mistypes. –  Jorge Fuentes González Mar 15 '13 at 17:12
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so basically null value means a variable has been explicitly set as (no value = null) or has been initialized and defined to be nothing. While undefined means. it was probably never initialized or if it was it was never defined. –  Muhammad Umer Aug 10 '13 at 11:06

i picked this from here

The undefined value is a primitive value used when a variable has not been assigned a value.

The null value is a primitive value that represents the null, empty, or non-existent reference.

When you declare a variable through var and do not give it a value, it will have the value undefined. By itself, if you try to WScript.Echo() or alert() this value, you won't see anything. However, if you append a blank string to it then suddenly it'll appear:

var s;
WScript.Echo(s);
WScript.Echo("" + s);

You can declare a variable, set it to null, and the behavior is identical except that you'll see "null" printed out versus "undefined". This is a small difference indeed.

You can even compare a variable that is undefined to null or vice versa, and the condition will be true:

undefined == null
null == undefined

They are, however, considered to be two different types. While undefined is a type all to itself, null is considered to be a special object value. You can see this by using typeof() which returns a string representing the general type of a variable:

var a;
WScript.Echo(typeof(a));
var b = null;
WScript.Echo(typeof(b));

Running the above script will result in the following output:

undefined
object

Regardless of their being different types, they will still act the same if you try to access a member of either one, e.g. that is to say they will throw an exception. With WSH you will see the dreaded "'varname' is null or not an object" and that's if you're lucky (but that's a topic for another article).

You can explicitely set a variable to be undefined, but I highly advise against it. I recommend only setting variables to null and leave undefined the value for things you forgot to set. At the same time, I really encourage you to always set every variable. JavaScript has a scope chain different than that of C-style languages, easily confusing even veteran programmers, and setting variables to null is the best way to prevent bugs based on it.

Another instance where you will see undefined pop up is when using the delete operator. Those of us from a C-world might incorrectly interpret this as destroying an object, but it is not so. What this operation does is remove a subscript from an Array or a member from an Object. For Arrays it does not effect the length, but rather that subscript is now considered undefined.

var a = [ 'a', 'b', 'c' ];
delete a[1];
for (var i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
WScript.Echo((i+".) "+a[i]);

The result of the above script is:

0.) a
1.) undefined
2.) c

You will also get undefined returned when reading a subscript or member that never existed.

The difference between null and undefined is: JavaScript will never set anything to null, that's usually what we do. While we can set variables to undefined, we prefer null because it's not something that is ever done for us. When you're debugging this means that anything set to null is of your own doing and not JavaScript. Beyond that, these two special values are nearly equivalent.

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Well done: great answer! –  Diego Deberdt Nov 3 '11 at 14:44
    
Really a good answer. But just to point out, when u checked "undefined == null" the type checking was not strict. Hence it returned "true". If you check "undefined === null", it would return false. –  wOlVeRiNe Feb 17 at 9:06

null is a special keyword that indicates an absence of value.

think about it as a value, like:

  • "foo" is string,
  • true is boolean ,
  • 1234 is number,
  • null is undefined.

undefined property indicates that a variable has not been assigned a value including null too . Like

var foo;

defined empty variable is null of datatype undefined


Both of them are representing a value of a variable with no value

AND null doesn't represent a string that has no value - empty string-


Like

var a = ''; 
console.log(typeof a); // string 
console.log(a == null); //false 
console.log(a == undefined); // false 

Now if

var a;
console.log(a == null); //true
console.log(a == undefined); //true 

BUT

var a; 
console.log(a === null); //false 
console.log(a === undefined); // true

SO each one has it own way to use

undefined use it to compare the variable data type

null use it to empty a value of a variable

var a = 'javascript';
a = null ; // will change the type of variable "a" from string to undefined 
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null is also a data type. Both undefined and null are data types and values –  danwellman Jun 21 at 14:38
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null Absolutely IS a data type: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/7wkd9z69(v=vs.94).aspx . The fact that typeof null returns object is a well known and documented bug in early versions of ECMAScript that has remained for backwards-compatibility. The link that you actually posted in your comment says halfway down the page "typeof null // object (bug in ECMAScript, should be null)" ! So please, show some search effort before commenting on down-votes –  danwellman Jun 25 at 18:33

null: absence of value for a variable; undefined: absence of variable itself;

..where variable is a symbolic name associated with a value.

JS could be kind enough to implicitly init newly declared variables with null, but it does not.

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Undefined means a variable has been declared but has no value:

var var1;
alert(var1); //undefined
alert(typeof var1); //undefined

Null is an assignment:

var var2= null;
alert(var2); //null
alert(typeof var2); //object
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In JavasSript there are 5 primitive data types String , Number , Boolean , null and undefined. I will try to explain with some simple example

lets say we have a simple function

 function test(a) {

     if(a == null){
        alert("a is null");
     } else {
        alert("The value of a is " + a);
     }
  }

also in above function if(a == null) is same as if(!a)

now when we call this function without passing the parameter a

   test(); it will alert "a is null";
   test(4); it will alert "The value of a is " + 4;

also

var a;
alert(typeof a); 

this will give undefined; we have declared a variable but we have not asigned any value to this variable; but if we write

var a = null;
alert(typeof a); will give alert as object

so null is an object. in a way we have assigned a value null to 'a'

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null is a special value meaning "no value". null is a special object because typeof null returns 'object'.

On the other hand, undefined means that the variable has not been declared, or has not been given a value.

Source.

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The value of a variable with no value is undefined (i.e., it has not been initialized).

Variables can be emptied by setting their value to null.

You can test for each using the === (three equal signs) or == (two equal signs) for comparison checking. The big difference is the latter uses coercion, which can have some odd results -- it returns true for a null or undefined comparison if they are either.

if (nullExample === null) { // executes this block only if null }
if (undExample ===Undefined) { // executes this block only if Undefined }
if (bothExampe == null) { // executes this block if Undefined or null }

You can be more exact with a comparison by using the typeof to return an object’s type.

If (typeof variable ==="undefined") { // executes this block of if undefined }
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null and undefined are two distinct object types which have the following in common:

  • both can only hold a single value, null and undefined respectively;
  • both have no properties or methods and an attempt to read any properties of either will result in a run-time error (for all other objects, you get value undefined if you try to read a non-existent property);
  • values null and undefined are considered equal to each other and to nothing else by == and != operators.

The similarities however end here. For once, there is a fundamental difference in the way how keywords null and undefined are implemented. This is not obvious, but consider the following example:

var undefined = "foo";
WScript.Echo(undefined); // This will print: foo

undefined, NaN and Infinity are just names of preinitialized "superglobal" variables - they are initialized at run-time and can be overridden by normal global or local variable with the same names.

Now, let's try the same thing with null:

var null = "foo"; // This will cause a compile-time error
WScript.Echo(null);

Oops! null, true and false are reserved keywords - compiler won't let you use them as variable or property names

Another difference is that undefined is considered a separate primitive type, while null is considered a special kind of object. Consider the following:

WScript.Echo(typeof false); // Will print: boolean
WScript.Echo(typeof 0); // Will print: number
WScript.Echo(typeof ""); // Will print: string
WScript.Echo(typeof {}); // Will print: object
WScript.Echo(typeof undefined); // Will print: undefined
WScript.Echo(typeof null); // (!!!) Will print: object

Also, there is an important difference in the way null and undefined are treated in numeric context:

var a; // declared but uninitialized variables hold the value undefined
WScript.Echo(a === undefined); // Prints: -1

var b = null; // the value null must be explicitly assigned 
WScript.Echo(b === null); // Prints: -1

WScript.Echo(a == b); // Prints: -1 (as expected)
WScript.Echo(a >= b); // Prints: 0 (WTF!?)

WScript.Echo(a >= a); // Prints: 0 (!!!???)
WScript.Echo(isNaN(a)); // Prints: -1 (a evaluates to NaN!)
WScript.Echo(1*a); // Prints: -1.#IND (in Echo output this means NaN)

WScript.Echo(b >= b); // Prints: -1 (as expected)
WScript.Echo(isNaN(b)); // Prints: 0 (b evaluates to a valid number)
WScript.Echo(1*b); // Prints: 0 (b evaluates to 0)

WScript.Echo(a >= 0 && a <= 0); // Prints: 0 (as expected)
WScript.Echo(a == 0); // Prints: 0 (as expected)
WScript.Echo(b >= 0 && b <= 0); // Prints: -1 (as expected)
WScript.Echo(b == 0); // Prints: 0 (!!!)

null becomes 0 when used in arithmetic expressions or numeric comparisons - similarly to false, it is basically just a special kind of "zero". undefined, on the other hand, is a true "nothing" and becomes NaN ("not a number") when you try to use it in numeric context.

Note that null and undefined receive a special treatment from == and != operators, but you can test true numeric equality of a and b with the expression (a >= b && a <= b).

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As typeof returns undefined, undefined is a type where as null is an initializer indicates the variable points to no object(virtually everything in Javascript is an object).

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Variable has not been initialized then it is undefined variable. Variables can be emptied by setting their value to null. You can test for each using the === (three equal signs) or == (two equal signs) for comparison checking

if (nullExample === null) { // executes this block only if null }

if (undExample ===Undefined) { // executes this block only if Undefined }

if (bothExampe == null) { // executes this block if Undefined or null }

You can be more exact with a comparison by using the typeof to return an object's type.

If (typeof variable ==="undefined")  { // executes this block of if undefined }
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You might consider undefined to represent a system-level, unexpected, or error-like absence of value and null to represent program-level, normal, or expected absence of value.

via JavaScript:The Definitive Guide

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null and undefined are both are used to represent the absence of some value.

var a = null;

a is initialized and defined.

typeof(a)
//object

null is an object in JavaScript

Object.prototype.toString.call(a) // [object Object]

var b;

b is undefined and uninitialized

undefined object properties are also undefined. For example "x" is not defined on object c and if you try to access c.x, it will return undefined.

Generally we assign null to variables not undefined.

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Just to add my views -

A variable that is declared only, and never used anywhere, is removed off by an optimizing compiler in case of compiled languages like C++[or a warning is flagged in the IDE]. It ultimately means that the variable is non-existent because it's memory is never allocated.

In case of javascript interpreter, [I guess] a variable is treated as existing only from the point onwards where it is given a value. Before that point, it's type is "undefined", and no memory is allocated for it. And, so its type is undefined.

A null in javascript is a value that represents an address, but that address points to nothing yet[non-existent reference]. Nevertheless, its a value.

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Nope, there needs to be some memory allocated to differentiate a declared (yet undefined) variable from a non-declared one. undefined is just a value as well, and it's the default value for uninitialized variables. –  Bergi Aug 18 at 7:23
    
I don't have the knowledge about how the js interpreter might be working, but the guess was based on the fact that the typeof operator applied to a non-existant variable and a declared-only variable yields the same "undefined" string. I have doubts about the fact that an undeclared variable gets a default primitive value undefined[perhaps, somebody who has internal knowldege of the interpreter could clarify this], even though the comparison would return true. There was no undefined value prior to ECMA-262? –  Hoven Aug 18 at 11:11
    
That typeof has the same output for these two cases doesn't mean anything (though it might hint at the original implementation in netscape). Admittedly, it's possible that an optimizing compiler doesn't allocate stack variables until they're assigned to, but I don't think the non-optimising ones of the various implementations (note: there isn't a single interpreter for the language) do this - after all, ES spec says variable environments are initialized on call. –  Bergi Aug 18 at 11:40
    
After a research I find my views were not correct. Please refer section 12.2 ECMA Standard - ecma-international.org/ecma-262/5.1/#sec-12.2 Quote: A variable statement declares variables that are created as defined in 10.5. Variables are initialised to undefined when created. And, on the following link, the point no. 2 clarifies that undeclared variables are in fact created only at the time of initialization, otherwise not - developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… –  Hoven Aug 28 at 12:48

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