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I have an application which is running multiple sql statements simultaneously in different threads, causing various deadlocks which all seem to come from one table. For example the two update statements below:

UPDATE WF SET QUEUETIME='2011-02-18 13:06:53.578', STATE = 'outbound', USER = '', TIME = null WHERE PID = 'MessageProcessing' AND ACTIVITYID = 'Delete' AND ITEMID = '120' AND TRANID = 'Created' AND STATE = 'ready' AND USER = ''

UPDATE WF SET QUEUETIME='2011-02-18 13:06:53.625', STATE = 'ready', USER = '', TIME = null WHERE PID = 'standardOutbound' AND ACTIVITYID = 'Node1' AND ITEMID = '121' AND TRANID = 'toNode1' AND STATE = '' AND USER = ''

produce the following deadlock:

<deadlock-list>
 <deadlock victim="process6d8e38">
  <process-list>
   <process id="process6d8e38" taskpriority="0" logused="272" waitresource="RID: 7:1:564:14" waittime="625" ownerId="430343" transactionname="implicit_transaction" lasttranstarted="2011-02-18T13:06:53.640" XDES="0xb44a258" lockMode="U" schedulerid="1" kpid="2632" status="suspended" spid="58" sbid="0" ecid="0" priority="0" transcount="2" lastbatchstarted="2011-02-18T13:06:53.640" lastbatchcompleted="2011-02-18T13:06:53.640" clientapp="jTDS" hostname="INTERWOV-FP1" hostpid="123" loginname="database1" isolationlevel="read committed (2)" xactid="430343" currentdb="7" TIMEout="4294967295" clientoption1="671088672" clientoption2="128058">
    <executionStack>
     <frame procname="adhoc" line="1" stmtstart="336" sqlhandle="0x0200000077e2b21749c20d3ca2ca8d4d89ea5ea29336e03e">
UPDATE WF  SET QUEUETIME =  @P0 , STATE =  @P1 , USER =  @P2 , TIME =  @P3  WHERE PID =  @P4  AND ACTIVITYID =  @P5  AND ITEMID =  @P6  AND TRANID =  @P7  AND STATE =  @P8  AND USER =  @P9     </frame>
    </executionStack>
    <inputbuf>
(@P0 datetime,@P1 nvarchar(4000),@P2 nvarchar(4000),@P3 datetime,@P4 nvarchar(4000),@P5 nvarchar(4000),@P6 int,@P7 nvarchar(4000),@P8 nvarchar(4000),@P9 nvarchar(4000))UPDATE WF  SET QUEUETIME =  @P0 , STATE =  @P1 , USER =  @P2 , TIME =  @P3  WHERE PID =  @P4  AND ACTIVITYID =  @P5  AND ITEMID =  @P6  AND TRANID =  @P7  AND STATE =  @P8  AND USER =  @P9     </inputbuf>
   </process>
   <process id="process8ccb68" taskpriority="0" logused="900" waitresource="RID: 7:1:564:12" waittime="625" ownerId="430341" transactionname="implicit_transaction" lasttranstarted="2011-02-18T13:06:53.623" XDES="0xaeccf48" lockMode="U" schedulerid="2" kpid="312" status="suspended" spid="53" sbid="0" ecid="0" priority="0" transcount="2" lastbatchstarted="2011-02-18T13:06:53.640" lastbatchcompleted="2011-02-18T13:06:53.623" clientapp="jTDS" hostname="INTERWOV-FP1" hostpid="123" loginname="database1" isolationlevel="read committed (2)" xactid="430341" currentdb="7" TIMEout="4294967295" clientoption1="671088672" clientoption2="128058">
    <executionStack>
     <frame procname="adhoc" line="1" stmtstart="336" sqlhandle="0x0200000077e2b21749c20d3ca2ca8d4d89ea5ea29336e03e">
UPDATE WF  SET QUEUETIME =  @P0 , STATE =  @P1 , USER =  @P2 , TIME =  @P3  WHERE PID =  @P4  AND ACTIVITYID =  @P5  AND ITEMID =  @P6  AND TRANID =  @P7  AND STATE =  @P8  AND USER =  @P9     </frame>
    </executionStack>
    <inputbuf>
(@P0 datetime,@P1 nvarchar(4000),@P2 nvarchar(4000),@P3 datetime,@P4 nvarchar(4000),@P5 nvarchar(4000),@P6 int,@P7 nvarchar(4000),@P8 nvarchar(4000),@P9 nvarchar(4000))UPDATE WF  SET QUEUETIME =  @P0 , STATE =  @P1 , USER =  @P2 , TIME =  @P3  WHERE PID =  @P4  AND ACTIVITYID =  @P5  AND ITEMID =  @P6  AND TRANID =  @P7  AND STATE =  @P8  AND USER =  @P9     </inputbuf>
   </process>
  </process-list>
  <resource-list>
   <ridlock fileid="1" pageid="564" dbid="7" objectname="database1.dbo.WF" id="lock3a63dc0" mode="X" associatedObjectId="72057594077577216">
    <owner-list>
     <owner id="process6d8e38" mode="X"/>
    </owner-list>
    <waiter-list>
     <waiter id="process8ccb68" mode="U" requestType="wait"/>
    </waiter-list>
   </ridlock>
   <ridlock fileid="1" pageid="564" dbid="7" objectname="database1.dbo.WF" id="lock3a65f40" mode="X" associatedObjectId="72057594077577216">
    <owner-list>
     <owner id="process8ccb68" mode="X"/>
    </owner-list>
    <waiter-list>
     <waiter id="process6d8e38" mode="U" requestType="wait"/>
    </waiter-list>
   </ridlock>
  </resource-list>
 </deadlock>
</deadlock-list>

I realise some amount of deadlocks are inevitable and the application should handle them (which it does), but I don't understand why they should be happening in this case. In my simplistic mind these two statements should be locking different rows, and even if they were updating the same row, one should just wait for the other.

Can anyone explain why they are causing deadlocks, or give any suggestions as to how to prevent them?

We have 3 non-clustered indexes on the table (PID, ACTIVITYID, ITEMID, TRANID), (ITEMID), and (PID, ACTIVITYID). (PID, ACTIVITYID, ITEMID, TRANID) form the primary key. I've tried (somewhat blindly) playing about with the indexes, but seemingly to no avail.

The application is running on weblogic and sql server 2005, and I've reproduced the deadlocks on websphere and sql server 2008. The don't seem to occur when using an oracle database, but this is unfortunately not an option for our client!

Many thanks to anyone who can offer help or insight into this.

share|improve this question
    
Oracle (by default) uses optimistic concurrency - which does not lock as much as MS SQL's pessimistic concurrency –  Chris Bednarski Feb 22 '11 at 10:41

2 Answers 2

Problem are usually not updates alone, but combination of selects and updates. Consider scenario, where transaction selects some row and then updates it. If two such transactions run parallel, deadlock occurs. Simplest solution is use UPDLOCK (and optionally ROWLOCK) hint in select statements; of course only for records, updated after - otherwise you may end in slow application.

share|improve this answer
    
As far as I can see, the code is getting a connection, running the single update statement then closing the connection, so I can't see where a select would be run. Unless an update somehow triggers an implicit select? Or the fact that we're using connection pooling in weblogic means transactions last longer than I think? I'm very much guessing here... –  LeeH Feb 22 '11 at 15:01
    
@LeeH Are you saying only these two updates are running simultaneously with no other read or write activity? If there is read activity, contention may be reduced by using snapshot isolation on the reads, but I generally recommend sticking to the default, read committed transaction isolation lock level –  Cade Roux Feb 22 '11 at 15:48
    
There may well be other activity on the database, but from the deadlock xdl it looks like it's these two updates running simultaneously that's causing the problem. I don't understand why they both have an X-lock while waiting for a U-lock, is this normal for an update? Is there some way to see in finer detail what is being locked - i.e. which rows etc? –  LeeH Feb 23 '11 at 11:52
    
@LeeH How exactly looks the code in question? Deadlock tree displays transaction count as 2 - this looks like you have some unfinished action going on that connection already. –  Arvo Feb 28 '11 at 10:45

Is there any clustered index? Any indexed views? Any other indexes? The columns being updated don't appear to be in any indexes. Row-level locking should be fine, but something must be causing an escalation. The sets appear to be disjoint, but perhaps the pages are overlapping (hence my question about the choice of clustered index).

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms184286.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
No clustered index, if I were to add one, should it be on all the columns being updated, or the ones in the where clause? we have other queries running that might update different subsets of the columns in this table. The transcations appear to already have X locks and are trying to then get to U locks, why would an update already have X locks? –  LeeH Feb 22 '11 at 15:00
    
@LeeH A clustered index should be unique (so no uniquifying element needs to be added), fixed width (for deterministic storage behavior), narrow (for efficient storage and working set), non-nullable (no need for a null block), increasing (to minimize page splits) and static (to minimize data movement) - sqlskills.com/BLOGS/KIMBERLY/category/Clustered-Index.aspx –  Cade Roux Feb 22 '11 at 15:46
    
@LeeH And by pages overlapping, I meant the row lie in the same page even though they are quite different in terms of how you might think the key would partition the space. But in a heap table, there is no order to the underlying data, so you have little or no control over that. However, I think a row lock escalates to a table lock without escalating to a page lock first anyway. –  Cade Roux Feb 22 '11 at 15:50
    
Thanks for all your help, I don't really know what much of this means but it's a great pointer as to what to read up on. –  LeeH Feb 23 '11 at 11:55

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