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I have an action returning an image:

    public void SensorData(int id, int width = 300, int height = 100)
    {
        using (var repo = new DataRepository())
        {
            var sensor = repo.GetSensor(id);
            if (sensor == null) return;

            var chart = new Chart(width, height);
            chart.AddSeries(name: "Values", 
                            chartType: "line", 
                            xValue: sensor.DataValues.Select(s => s.Date).ToList(),
                            yValues: sensor.DataValues.Select(s => s.Value).ToList());

            chart.Write();
        }
    }

This action renders fine when i call it from the browser (ex. controller_name/SensorData/6). The problem is that when i try to view it using Html.RenderAction i get the following compilation exception on my view:

The best overloaded method match for 'System.Web.WebPages.WebPageExecutingBase.Write(System.Web.WebPages.HelperResult)' has some invalid arguments.

This is the code generating the exception:

@Html.RenderAction("SensorTypes", new { id = 6});

Any ideas on what might be causing this?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to do this? Won't this write out image data into a webpage, which is presumably not what you want? –  MrKWatkins Feb 22 '11 at 11:36
    
This is the way in which most samples on Charts inside MVC that i found were written –  scripni Feb 22 '11 at 12:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't embed the image data directly in the HTML. Try using an image tag and pointing to the action instead.

<img src='@Url.Action("SensorTypes", new { id = 6})'  />
share|improve this answer

You have two possibilities:

@{Html.RenderAction("SensorTypes", new { id = 6 });}

or:

@Html.Action("SensorTypes", new { id = 6 })

Contrast this with their equivalents using the WebForms view engine:

<% Html.RenderAction("SensorTypes", new { id = 6 }); %>
<%= Html.Action("SensorTypes", new { id = 6 }) %>
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Damn extra brackets! –  DancesWithBamboo Apr 9 '13 at 20:52

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