Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a right outer join query in SQL Server 2005 and it's working fine, but I am not able to convert it to LINQ.


Here is my query:

select b.number, COUNT(*) AS [AudioCount] from audios a
right join months b on DATEPART(Month, a.[RecordedDate]) = b.number
group by number

Please help me convert it to LINQ.

Thanks & Regards, Anil Saklania

EDIT: Corrected query.

share|improve this question
    
Isn't it a left join? – Alex Feb 22 '11 at 11:14
    
sorry, this is the query – Anil Feb 22 '11 at 11:16
    
select b.number, COUNT(*) AS [AudioCount] from audios a right join months b on DATEPART(Month, a.[RecordedDate])=b.number group by number and want to change in linq – Anil Feb 22 '11 at 11:17
    
what is it doing? grouping audios by RecordedDate month? (DataContext.Audios.GroupBy(a => a.RecordedDate.Month ?) – Guillaume86 Feb 22 '11 at 11:30

Depending on what you are looking for I have inverted it to be a left join but it is a left join from months to audio. This will enable you to return a count of zero when a month has no audio recordings. Used paolo's original testing data to test this out.

var audioMonths = from month in ListOfMonths
                    join audio in ListOfAudios on
                        month.number equals audio.RecordedDate.Month into audioLeftJoin
                    from audio in audioLeftJoin.DefaultIfEmpty()
                    select new
                    {
                        Month = month.number,
                        AudioId = audio != null ? audio.someProperty : null //Need some property on the audio object to see if it exists
                    };
var monthAudioCount = from audioMonth in audioMonths
                            group audioMonth by audioMonth.Month into grouping
                            select new
                            {
                                Month = grouping.Key,
                                AudioCount = grouping.Count(audioMonth => audioMonth.AudioId != null)
                            };
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, re-added the tests for reference (I was still editing the answer but you beat me to it... +1 :) ) – Paolo Falabella Feb 22 '11 at 12:40
    
Ah awesome. I did not notice they were gone. – Mike B Feb 22 '11 at 13:00

First, some notes from book: LINQ Pocket Reference by J. & B. Albahari:
1. Using an extra from translates to a SelectMany.
2. An into clause translates to a GroupJoin when it appears directly after a join clause.


Both of the excellent solutions above, by Mike and by Paolo, utilize a second, extra from clause in the query because that translates to a SelectMany. With SelectMany, a “sequence of sequences” ( a sequence of audio sequences ) is converted into a single flat collection result set. Then, to count the audios, that single flat output collection is, in a second step, grouped according to month. In both solutions above, that is done, and it works OK, but it also necessitates careful checking for nulls.

EXPLOITING THE NATURAL HIERARCHY. A cleaner alternative way is the use a GroupJoin instead of SelectMany. GroupJoin yields a hierarchical result set, rather than the flat result set of SelectMany. The hierarchical result set needs no grouping, of course, so we eliminate the second step.

Best of all, by utilizing the hierarchical result set of GroupJoin, we don’t have to check for nulls.
Thus we achieve another clean left outer join by this code, and borrowing Paolo's data:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var ListOfAudios = new List<Audio>() {
        new Audio() { someProperty = "test", RecordedDate = new DateTime(2011, 01, 01) }, 
        new Audio() { someProperty = "test", RecordedDate = new DateTime(2011, 01, 02) }, 
        new Audio() { someProperty = "test", RecordedDate = new DateTime(2011, 02, 01) }, 
        new Audio() { someProperty = "test", RecordedDate = new DateTime(2011, 02, 02) } 
        };

    var ListOfMonths = new List<Month>() {
        new Month() {number=1, someMonthProperty="testMonth"},         
        new Month() {number=2, someMonthProperty="testMonth"},         
        new Month() {number=3, someMonthProperty="testMonth"}        
        };

    var q = from month in ListOfMonths
                      join audio in ListOfAudios on month.number equals audio.RecordedDate.Month 
                      into hierarch
                      select new
                      {
                          MonthNum = month.number,
                          AudioCnt = hierarch.Count()
                      };

    foreach (var m in q)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", m.MonthNum,m.AudioCnt);
    }
    Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this answer

As per some of the comments to your question there are probably more straightforward ways to do what you want than translating your query to linq. However, just as an exercise, here's a way to write it:

var res = from audio in ListOfAudios
    join month in ListOfMonths
    on audio.RecordedDate.Month equals month.number into joinAudioMonth
    from j in joinAudioMonth.DefaultIfEmpty()
    group j by j.number into g
    select new                             
    {
    number = g.Key,
    cnt = g.Count()
    };

EDIT: the code above does not do a RIGHT JOIN as you requested, here's a revised one based on Mike's answer. This one does not rely on a property of the Audio object (that might be null even if the object itself exists). But I'm being nitpicky, Mike's answer is basically the correct one.

var audioMonths = 
    from month in ListOfMonths
    join audio in ListOfAudios on
        month.number equals audio.RecordedDate.Month into monthAudioJoin
    from joined in monthAudioJoin.DefaultIfEmpty()
    select new
    {
        Month = month.number,
        J = joined
    };

var res = from audioMonth in audioMonths
group audioMonth by audioMonth.Month into grouping
select new
{
    number = grouping.Key,
    cnt = grouping.Count(a => a.J != null)
};                              

and here's how I tested it:

public class Audio 
{
    public string someProperty {get; set;}
    public DateTime RecordedDate {get; set; }
}

public class Month 
{
    public string someMonthProperty {get; set;}
    public int number {get; set; }
}

public static void Main (string[] args)
{
    var ListOfAudios = new List<Audio>() {
        new Audio(){someProperty="test", RecordedDate=new DateTime(2011,01,01)},
        new Audio(){someProperty="test", RecordedDate=new DateTime(2011,01,02)},
        new Audio(){someProperty="test", RecordedDate=new DateTime(2011,02,01)},
        new Audio(){someProperty="test", RecordedDate=new DateTime(2011,02,02)}            
    };         

    var ListOfMonths = new List<Month>() {
        new Month() {number=1, someMonthProperty="testMonth"},
        new Month() {number=2, someMonthProperty="testMonth"},
        new Month() {number=3, someMonthProperty="testMonth"}
        // ...
    };

    var audioMonths = 
        from month in ListOfMonths
        join audio in ListOfAudios on
            month.number equals audio.RecordedDate.Month into monthAudioJoin
        from joined in monthAudioJoin.DefaultIfEmpty()
        select new
        {
            Month = month.number,
            J = joined
        };

    var res = from audioMonth in audioMonths
    group audioMonth by audioMonth.Month into grouping
    select new
    {
        number = grouping.Key,
        cnt = grouping.Count(a => a.J != null)
    };                              

    foreach(var r in res)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1}", r.number, r.cnt);

    }
share|improve this answer
    
This would be a left join.... – cjk Feb 22 '11 at 13:43
    
@ck - you're right. I was fixing it but Mike was quicker. – Paolo Falabella Feb 22 '11 at 14:26
    
Ah yeah checking the object and not a property on the object is probably a better way to handle it. – Mike B Feb 22 '11 at 18:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.