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is there is any function in c++ ,similar to dirname in php...it is used to normalize the url

eg
<?php
$url = "../tets/index.html";
$currentURL = "http://example.com/somedir/anotherdir";
echo dirname($currentURL).substr($url, 2);
?>
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2  
Dup of stackoverflow.com/questions/2616011/… - use boost::network::http::uri::path() to extract that part of a URL. –  FrankH. Feb 22 '11 at 11:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, but implementing it yourself is trivial.

std::string DirName(std::string source)
{
    source.erase(std::find(source.rbegin(), source.rend(), '/').base(), source.end());
    return source;
}

Even better would be to implement it as a method template:

template<typename string_t>
string_t DirName(string_t source)
{
    source.erase(std::find(source.rbegin(), source.rend(), '/').base(), source.end());
    return source;
}

EDIT: And for some reason if you want what @larsmans is talking about in the comment below:

template<typename string_t>
string_t DirName(string_t source)
{
    if (source.size() <= 1) //Make sure it's possible to check the last character.
    {
        return source;
    }
    if (*(source.rbegin() + 1) == '/') //Remove trailing slash if it exists.
    {
        source.pop_back();
    }
    source.erase(std::find(source.rbegin(), source.rend(), '/').base(), source.end());
    return source;
}
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... except that the OP might want to turn foo/bar/ into foo instead of foo/bar, and there are several more corner cases in path/URL handling. –  larsmans Feb 22 '11 at 15:24
    
@larsmans: This code does what dirname does. If your description is what the OP wants then (s)he needs to specify that. Obviously if (s)he needs to do more then it'd be a good idea to use a library, but this task in and of itself is trivial. –  Billy ONeal Feb 22 '11 at 15:27
    
Except that "If there are no slashes in path, a dot ('.') is returned, indicating the current directory"... Fair enough, +1. –  larsmans Feb 22 '11 at 15:38
    
@larsmans: Also, this doesn't remove the trailing slash. That differs from dirname but matches the OP's example above :/ –  Billy ONeal Feb 22 '11 at 15:46

Standard C++ has no notion of directories, so you will either have to use a platform-specific function, or a portable library such as Boost.Filesystem.

I wouldn't use such a function on a URL though; try to find a proper URL parsing library.

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And +1 to you for pointing out some good libraries if the OP needs to do something more :) –  Billy ONeal Feb 22 '11 at 15:45

There is no directory access in the C++ language. You need to implement this with platform dependent functions like FindFirst/FindNext (Microsoft Windows) or with a library like boost (Boost.Filesystem).

share|improve this answer
    
There certainly is file access in C++. –  larsmans Feb 22 '11 at 12:03
    
there is more likely a Path...() functions in shlwapi.lib that perform the same stuff without the need to iterate through the path using FindFirst()/FindNext()... –  Adrien Plisson Feb 22 '11 at 12:13
    
@larsman: You can access files with C-run-time functions and the C++ standard library, but not in the C++ language. What function or classes do you propose for directory access? –  harper Feb 22 '11 at 14:57
    
ok, it's not in the language, it's in the library. I don't think that distinction is relevant to the OP's needs. –  larsmans Feb 22 '11 at 15:22

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