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I need to read a binary file consisting of 4 byte integers (little endian) into a 2D array for my Android application. My current solution is the following:

DataInputStream inp = null;
try {
    inp = new DataInputStream(new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(procData), 32768));
}
catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    Log.e(TAG, "File not found");
}

int[][] test_data = new int[SIZE_X][SIZE_Y];
byte[] buffer = new byte[4];
ByteBuffer byteBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(4);
for (int i=0; i < SIZE_Y; i++) {
    for (int j=0; j < SIZE_X; j++) {
        inp.read(buffer);
        byteBuffer = ByteBuffer.wrap(buffer);
        test_data[j][SIZE_Y - i - 1] = byteBuffer.order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN).getInt();
    }
}

This is pretty slow for a 2k*2k array, it takes about 25 seconds. I can see in the DDMS that the garbage collector is working overtime, so that is probably one reason for the slowness.

There has to be a more efficient way of using the ByteBuffer to read that file into the array, but I'm not seeing it at the moment. Any idea on how to speed this up?

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Do you really need to read all the data at the same time? And do you access many entries often? If not, you can avoid to "parse" the whole array as integers. Just read or wrap the whole file, and provide just the needed entry by calculating its offset from the x y coordinates. –  Luzifer42 Feb 22 '11 at 12:47
1  
@Luzifer I need all of the data at least once in the beginning. –  Mad Scientist Feb 22 '11 at 12:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Why not read into a 4-byte buffer and then rearrange the bytes manually? It will look like this:

for (int i=0; i < SIZE_Y; i++) {
    for (int j=0; j < SIZE_X; j++) {
        inp.read(buffer);
        int nextInt = (buffer[0] & 0xFF) | (buffer[1] & 0xFF) << 8 | (buffer[2] & 0xFF) << 16 | (buffer[3] & 0xFF) << 24;
        test_data[j][SIZE_Y - i - 1] = nextInt;
    }
}

Of course, it is assumed that read reads all four bytes, but you should check for the situation when it's not. This way you won't create any objects during reading (so no strain on the garbage collector), you don't call anything, you just use bitwise operations.

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Thanks, this version is about 5x as fast as my original one, it only takes 5 seconds now. I'm not used to fiddle around with the bits directly. –  Mad Scientist Feb 22 '11 at 12:51
    
This is the only working method I've found to convert raw bytes to unsigned int. Thanks! –  demil133 May 3 '13 at 2:37
    
Why do you make bitwise & with FF? Isn't byte written on 8 bits? If so, that operation wouldn't do anything... What am I missing? –  Sushi271 Mar 15 at 17:47
1  
@Sushi271 Because if you just cast a byte to int, you may get negative numbers as bytes are signed. For example, if a byte contains 0b11111111, it will become -1 and not 255. –  Malcolm Mar 15 at 17:50

First of all, your 'inp.read(buffer)' is unsafe, as read contract does not guarantee that it will read all 4 bytes.

That aside, for quick transformation use the algorithm from DataInputStream.readInt

I've adapted for you case of byte array of 4 bytes:

int little2big(byte[ ] b) {
    return (b[3]&0xff)<<24)+((b[2]&0xff)<<16)+((b[1]&0xff)<<8)+(b[0]&0xff);
}
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If you are on a platform that supports memory-mapped files, consider the MappedByteBuffer and friends from java.nio

FileChannel channel = new RandomAccessFile(procData, "r").getChannel();
MappedByteBuffer map = channel.map(FileChannel.MapMode.READ_ONLY, 0, 4 * SIZE_X * SIZE_Y);
map.order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);
IntBuffer buffer = map.asIntBuffer();

int[][] test_data = new int[SIZE_X][SIZE_Y];
for (int i=0; i < SIZE_Y; i++) {
    for (int j=0; j < SIZE_X; j++) {
        test_data[j][SIZE_Y - i - 1] = buffer.get();
    }
}

If you need cross-platform support or your platform lacks memory-mapped buffers, you may still want to avoid performing the conversions yourself using an IntBuffer. Consider dropping the BufferedInputStream, allocating a larger ByteBuffer yourself and obtaining a little-endian IntBuffer view on the data. Then in a loop reset the buffer positions to 0, use DataInputStream.readFully to read the large regions at once into the ByteBuffer, and pull int values out of the IntBuffer.

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