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I'm writing a protocol class, which includes a lot of if/elses..here's the class:

public class Protocol {
    Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
    private static final int WAITING = 0;
    private static final int SENTREQUEST = 1;
    private static final int SENTITEMS = 2;
    private static final int ANOTHER = 3;
    private static final int CHOICE = 4;
    private int choice;

    private int state = WAITING;



    public String processInput(String theInput) {
        String theOutput = null;

        if (state == WAITING) {
            theOutput = "Do you accept the terms of agreement? Y/N?";
            state = SENTREQUEST;
        } else if (state == SENTREQUEST) {
            if (theInput.equalsIgnoreCase("y")) {

              theOutput = ": 1. program file 2. pictures 3. documentation";
              state = CHOICE;
             } else {
                theOutput = "Invalid Input!";
                state = SENTITEMS;

            }

        }
        else if (state == CHOICE) {
            choice = scan.nextInt();
            switch(choice) {
                case 1: theOutput = "show something";
                break;
                case 2: theOutput = "show something";
                break;
                case 3: theOutput = "show something";
                break;
            }
        }
        else if (state == SENTITEMS) {

              theOutput = "Want another? (y/n)";
                state = ANOTHER;

        } else if (state == ANOTHER) {

              theOutput = "Do you accept the terms of agreement? Y/N?";

            if (theInput.equalsIgnoreCase("y")) {
                theOutput ="test";
                state = SENTREQUEST;
            } else {
                theOutput = "Bye.";
                state = WAITING;
            }
        }
        return theOutput;
    }
}

It doesn't get to the switch case, and i'm sure it's an issue of breaking out of the if/elses clauses correctly but i can't find the issue.

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5  
You haven't shown how this is being called. The first call to it will always just set the state to SENT_REQUEST and then return, for example. It's also not clear why you're not switching on the state in the first place (or indeed using an enum). – Jon Skeet Feb 22 '11 at 12:35
    
have you put a breakpoint in to debug it? That's where I'd start normally. – Chimoo Feb 22 '11 at 12:36
    
It might be useful to understand that scan.nextInt() only attempts to read the next token as an int, so you need to make sure the next token actually is an int first – Chimoo Feb 22 '11 at 12:41
1  
As with the comment by chimoo, I am curious as to why you have a scan.nextInt() whereas the remainder of the code uses "theInput". Are you accidentally "eating" your number in theInput and hanging on the call to nextInt? Some sample program output may help understand what is happening. – M. Jessup Feb 22 '11 at 13:45
    
@M. Jessup You're completely right, I caste theInput into an integer and it works now. – stokkseyri Feb 22 '11 at 13:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

To solve a similar problem, once I implemented the strategy pattern as an enum. For each strategy, you create a new value for the enum, incapsulating the code in an enum method:

public enum Strategy {

    FIRST_STRATEGY {
        public String process(String input) {
            // Implementation for first strategy
            return null;
        }       
    },

    SECOND_STRATEGY {
        public String process(String input) {
            // Implementation for second strategy
            return null;
        }       

    };

    public abstract String process(String input);

}

You can apply the chosen strategy depending on the enum value you have, actually removing the chain of if/else statements:

Strategy chosenStrategy = Strategy.FIRST_STRATEGY;
String output = chosenStrategy.process(input);

This is a solution I applied for a problem of mine, perhaps it's not the optimal or the more object-oriented one. You have to choose the right solution for your problem, but I hope that my experience can help.

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1  
While this is a more elegant way to write the same program, it does not really address the problem of the original question, I think. – Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 22 '11 at 13:40

Use State pattern like this:

public class Protocol {
    Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);

    private abstract class State { abstract String doit(String theInput); }

    private final class WAITING extends State {
      String doit(String theInput) {
         state = SENTREQUEST;
         return "Do you accept the terms of agreement? Y/N?";
      }
    }

    private final class SENTREQUEST extends State {
      String doIt(String theInput) {
        if (theInput.equalsIgnoreCase("y")) {
              state = CHOICE;
              return ": 1. program file 2. pictures 3. documentation";
             } else {
                state = SENTITEMS;
                return "Invalid Input!";
            }
      }
    }

 //TODO refactoring to State classes for all
 //        private static final int SENTITEMS = 2;
 //        private static final int ANOTHER = 3;
 //        private static final int CHOICE = 4;*/
    private int choice;

    private State state = WAITING;



    public String processInput(String theInput) {
        return state.doIt(theInput);
    }
}
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