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Using -webkit-transform: rotate(-5deg); on a container div, Chrome renders the grid of images with really jagged edges. Whereas in FF (-moz-transform:) and IE (-ms-filter:) everything looks OK - see the difference below.

Is there any thing I can do about this?

chrome ff

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-webkit- renders in FF and IE? –  Kyle Sevenoaks Feb 22 '11 at 12:39
    
using: -ms-filter and -moz-transform –  davivid Feb 22 '11 at 12:40
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Aha ok :) jsfiddle.net/Kyle_Sevenoaks/RGRey looks the same to me in FF and Chrome, is Chrome zoomed? –  Kyle Sevenoaks Feb 22 '11 at 12:42
    
no zooming, text and other elements all seem to be ok elsewhere - its just on images it seems - please see above –  davivid Feb 22 '11 at 12:53
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possible duplicate of css transform, jagged edges in chrome –  Frank van Puffelen Apr 25 '13 at 13:15

9 Answers 9

up vote 57 down vote accepted

You could check out the answer to the question css transform, jagged edges in chrome

Helped me out

From the accepted answer:

In case anyone's searching for this later on, a nice trick to get rid of those jagged edges on CSS transformations in Chrome is to add the CSS property -webkit-backface-visibility with a value of hidden. In my own tests, this has completely smoothed them out. Hope that helps.

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This answer should be marked as the best answer. –  android.nick Nov 26 '11 at 6:15
    
Agree with @android.nick –  Hezad Apr 25 '12 at 13:42
    
It works! They really should fix this bug, even though it is marked as 'fixed', it is clearly not due to the difference you notice when applying the css property mentioned above. –  starbeamrainbowlabs Aug 26 '12 at 16:10
    
This solution may cause transparent "dead" pixels in the rotated image if you rotate it back and forth. –  Kamil Szot Jun 3 '13 at 9:56
    
It's ok, but not good. Firefox still renders waaaay better. –  Andrew Jul 18 '13 at 0:28

It appears to be an Antialiasing bug in the webkit engine. A report has been filed but is as yet unsolved.

You can try adding a border the same color as your background to try to minimise the effect.

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ok thanks, originally I did have borders but was hoping not to have them, it does reduce effect the somewhat though –  davivid Feb 22 '11 at 13:19
    
No problem, glad it helped :) –  Kyle Sevenoaks Feb 22 '11 at 13:19
    
in the original design a white css border helped a lot, but a black border didn't help so much in this version. But by giving the actual images files a 2px black border the problem is solved. –  davivid Feb 22 '11 at 15:20
    
In the last comment here you can see that sending the element to through the GPU the get a workaround. You have to do something like this: rotate(90deg) translateZ(0) –  Julio García May 24 '12 at 6:05
    
This workaround works perfect. Thanks Julio. –  leon Aug 17 '12 at 3:25

Have you tried the CSS rule -webkit-transform-style: preserve-3d;?

You could also try rotating the specific axis with -webkit-transform: rotateZ(-5deg);.

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no I hadn't tried, but it doesn't seem to have any noticeable effect. cheers though. –  davivid Feb 22 '11 at 13:17
-webkit-transform: rotate(-5deg) translate3d( 0, 0, 0);

Does the trick for chrome.

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This is a WebKit bug that has been already fixed and the fix shall appear in Chrome 15.

The workaround until everyone updates to 15+ is to apply -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden; to the element being rotated. Worked for me. That triggers antialiasing on the element.

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This worked for me, looks like backface-visibility triggers the antialiasing As of Chrome 23 this bug is not fixed in Chrome on Windows 7 –  remy Dec 7 '12 at 13:23
    
Chrome 33, Windows 7 - still an issue... Please see my answer. –  Just Plain High Apr 5 at 13:35

This won't be appropriate for all uses, but where you have control over the markup and don't mind adding an extra <div>, you can make use of generated content to dramatically clean up the edges of rotated images in Chrome. This works because Chrome will apply anti-aliasing to the generated content placed over the image.

You can see an example here: http://jsfiddle.net/cherryflavourpez/2SKQW/2/

The first image has nothing done to it, the second has a border applied to match the background colour - not any difference that I can see.

The third image div has some generated content with a border placed around the edge. You lose a pixel around the edge, but it looks much better. The CSS is pretty self-explanatory. This has the advantage of not requiring you to create the border in your image, which seems like too big a price to me.

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Apparently the latest Dev build of Chrome has regressed and this trick no longer works. Some more searching came up with this line: -webkit-transform-style:preserve-3d; Which seems to do the trick. –  CherryFlavourPez Apr 24 '11 at 21:47

You can add box-shadow to your images with the same color as your background, that reduce the effect.

example: http://antialiasing-webkit.qip.li/edit/

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For me it was the perspective CSS property that did the trick:

-webkit-perspective: 1000;

Completely illogical in my case as I use no 3d transitions, but works nonetheless.

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I encountered this issue on Chrome 33 (Windows 7). I tried all the suggested fixes on this page. Misery ensued. My rotation was pretty simple:

transform: rotate(40deg);
-moz-transform: rotate(40deg);
-webkit-transform: rotate(40deg);

I found this answer and after some quick experimentation I found that the following combination works perfectly in Chrome:

-webkit-backface-visibility: hidden;
outline: 1px solid transparent;

I haven't tested cross browser yet. I have no idea which further bugs this introduces. You have been warned. Hope this points someone in the right direction.


Side note: During my experiments I found that -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden; (on its own) removed the antialiasing from untransformed images.

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