Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given this HTML:

<p>
    <span> Foo </span>
    <span> Bar </span>
</p>

and this CSS:

span { 
    display:inline-block;
    width:100px;
}

as a result, there will be a 4px wide space between the SPAN elements.
Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/dGHFV/

I understand why this happens, and I also know that I could get rid of that space by removing the white-space between the SPAN elements in the HTML source code, like so:

<p>
    <span> Foo </span><span> Bar </span>
</p>

However, I was hoping for a CSS solution that doesn't require the HTML source code to be tampered with.

I know how to solve this with JavaScript - by removing the Text nodes from the container element (the paragraph), like so:

// jQuery
$('p').contents().filter(function() { return this.nodeType === 3; }).remove();

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/dGHFV/1/

But can this issue be solved with CSS alone?

share|improve this question
1  
@Kyle Sevenoaks - It may not always be 4px; I'd say margin-left:1em, since the gap will be one character, so will be relative to the font size. –  Spudley Feb 22 '11 at 12:51
    
What happened to my comment? @Spudley, I read it was a 4px gap, it worked for me, but like I said it wasn't the best as it also leftified the first element. –  Kyle Sevenoaks Feb 22 '11 at 12:53
1  
@Kyle: 1em may just be 4px for you with that font at that resolution. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 22 '11 at 12:57
    
Aye, I got that. :) –  Kyle Sevenoaks Feb 22 '11 at 13:01
    
@Spudley: Gap is not 1 character but one space, which is more likely half EM and not whole one. But this is also determined by each font. They may define space of different size... Just FYI. –  Robert Koritnik Aug 17 '12 at 12:55
show 6 more comments

18 Answers

up vote 202 down vote accepted

Since this answer has become rather popular, I'm rewriting it significantly.

Let's not forget the actual question that was asked:

How to remove the space between inline-block elements? I was hoping for a CSS solution that doesn't require the HTML source code to be tampered with. Can this issue be solved with CSS alone?

It is possible to solve this problem with CSS alone, but there are no completely robust CSS fixes.

The solution I had in my initial answer was to add font-size: 0 to the parent element, and then declare a sensible font-size on the children.

http://jsfiddle.net/thirtydot/dGHFV/1361/

This works in recent versions of all modern browsers. It works in IE8. It does not work in Safari 5, but it does work in Safari 6. Safari 5 is nearly a dead browser (1.49%, July 2013).

Most of the possible issues with relative font sizes are not complicated to fix.

However, while this is a reasonable solution if you specifically need a CSS only fix, it's not what I recommend if you're free to change your HTML (as most of us are).


This is what I, as a reasonably experienced web developer, actually do to solve this problem:

<p>
    <span>Foo</span><span>Bar</span>
</p>

Yes, that's right. I remove the whitespace in the HTML between the inline-block elements.

It's easy. It's simple. It works everywhere. It's the pragmatic solution.

You do sometimes have to carefully consider where whitespace will come from. Will appending another element with jQuery add whitespace? No, not if you do it properly.

Let's go on a magical journey of different ways to remove the whitespace, with some new HTML:

<ul>
    <li>Item 1</li>
    <li>Item 2</li>
    <li>Item 3</li>
</ul>
  • You can do this, as I usually do:

    <ul>
        <li>Item 1</li><li>Item 2</li><li>Item 3</li>
    </ul>
    

    http://jsfiddle.net/thirtydot/dGHFV/1362/

  • Or, this:

    <ul>
        <li>Item 1</li
        ><li>Item 2</li
        ><li>Item 3</li>
    </ul>
    
  • Or, use comments:

    <ul>
        <li>Item 1</li><!--
        --><li>Item 2</li><!--
        --><li>Item 3</li>
    </ul>
    
  • Or, you can even skip certain closing tags entirely (all browsers are fine with this):

    <ul>
        <li>Item 1
        <li>Item 2
        <li>Item 3
    </ul>
    

Now that I've gone and bored you to death with "one thousand different ways to remove whitespace, by thirtydot", hopefully you've forgotten all about font-size: 0.

share|improve this answer
6  
It works in FF3.6, IE9RC, O11, Ch9. However, in Safari 5 there still remains a 1px wide gap :( –  Šime Vidas Feb 22 '11 at 13:04
5  
@thirtydot Could you check out the comment of this answer. It could be that this font-size:0 trick is not such a good idea after all... –  Šime Vidas Aug 1 '11 at 20:05
13  
I know the poster is looking for a CSS solution, but this solution - which is by far the most voted (30 votes vs 5 as I write this) - has strong side effects and doesn't even work cross browser. At this point it's more pragmatic to simply remove the problematic whitespace in your HTML. –  Steph Thirion Nov 18 '11 at 0:21
4  
this solution only works if you dont work with EMs for your container sizes –  meo Jun 26 '12 at 14:40
3  
Downvoting because the solution isn't a cross-browser one (hello Safari 5). –  jamix Mar 22 '13 at 11:57
show 16 more comments

For CSS3 conforming browsers there is white-space-collapsing:discard

see: http://www.w3.org/TR/2010/WD-css3-text-20101005/#white-space-collapsing

share|improve this answer
    
hmm. will be interesting to see which browsers that actually works in. –  Spudley Feb 22 '11 at 12:58
4  
+1 but should really be +0.1(alpha) in-line with the level of support available –  Andras Zoltan Feb 22 '11 at 13:05
3  
That is one neat CSS property :) Unfortunately, it seems that they're still debating on its name, so I doubt that any browser has implemented it yet. –  Šime Vidas Feb 22 '11 at 13:07
46  
Dear google searchers from the year 2015. We envy you, because this will probably work for you. –  Chris Feb 26 '12 at 18:14
8  
This is no longer present in the 2012 revision of the Text module. It's highly unlikely it will make it to CR :( –  BoltClock Sep 14 '12 at 18:55
show 4 more comments

Yahoo Grids makes heavy use of inline-block declarations (together with some hacks for IE), to place blocks next to each other without using floats. In the heart of this solution, they utilize letter-spacing and word-spacing to allow the HTML to remain as independent of presentation. So, in the spirit of Grids, without the hacks necessary for it to work properly in IE, do the following to remove the white-space with CSS:

p {
  letter-spacing: -.31em;
  word-spacing: -.43em;
}

span { 
    display:inline-block;
    width:100px;
    letter-spacing: normal;
    word-spacing: normal;
}

Remember though, that the em-measurements used relies on that it is well-defined how big an em really is across browsers. Yahoo Grids relies on Yahoo Fonts and Yahoo Reset to achieve this, so if you want to roll your own system, you should standardize the size of an em too.

share|improve this answer
1  
Well, if Yahoo is using this then it must be a solid solution. Unfortunately, I have little experience with em values, so I think I'll stick with the font-size:0 hack. –  Šime Vidas Feb 22 '11 at 13:22
    
ems isn't required to use this solution. It works just fine even if you use pixels to declare your font sizes everywhere else. –  Philip Walton Jan 9 '12 at 7:52
1  
This terrible 'solution' made up from the 'magic constant' without any clear substantiation (.31em is quite close to the space character width in Helvetica, but .43em doesn't resemble anything that makes sense!) is simply broken. It counted on an old WebKit bug, which is now fixed, making it work no more in WebKit browsers. PLEASE STOP COPYING-AND-PASTING THIS NONSENSE WITHOUT THINKING! –  Ilya Streltsyn Jul 24 '13 at 1:48
    
@Ilya-streltsyn: I'd love to! Magic constants suck. Show me a better solution, instead of just complaining, and I'll switch now –  PatrikAkerstrand Jul 24 '13 at 14:40
1  
@PatrikAkerstrand, the only real solution is to remove the inter-tag spaces in the markup. All ways to hide these spaces with CSS are merely workarounds. There are lots of them — from negative margins to custom font where spaces have zero width. You can chose what fits better, but usually the simpler and more understandable is the solution, the more reliable it is. –  Ilya Streltsyn Jul 24 '13 at 15:06
add comment

Ok, although I've upvoted both the font-size: 0; and the not implemented CSS3 feature answers, after trying I found out that none of them is a real solution.

Actually, there is not even one workaround without strong side effects.

Then i decided to remove the spaces (this answers is about this argument) between the inline-block divs from my HTML source (JSP), turning this:

<div class="inlineBlock">
    I'm an inline-block div
</div>
<div class="inlineBlock">
    I'm an inline-block div
</div>

to this

<div class="inlineBlock">
    I'm an inline-block div
</div><div class="inlineBlock">
    I'm an inline-block div
</div>

that is ugly, but working.

But, wait a minute... what if I'm generating my divs inside Taglibs loops (Struts2, JSTL, etc...) ?

For example:

<s:iterator begin="0" end="6" status="ctrDay">
    <br/>
    <s:iterator begin="0" end="23" status="ctrHour">
        <s:push value="%{days[#ctrDay.index].hours[#ctrHour.index]}">
            <div class="inlineBlock>
                I'm an inline-block div in a matrix 
                (Do something here with the pushed object...)
           </div>
       </s:push>
    </s:iterator>
</s:iterator>

It is absolutely not thinkable to inline all that stuff, it would mean

<s:iterator begin="0" end="6" status="ctrDay">
    <br/>
    <s:iterator begin="0" end="23" status="ctrHour"><s:push value="%{days[#ctrDay.index].hours[#ctrHour.index]}"><div class="inlineBlock>
                I'm an inline-block div in a matrix             
                (Do something here with the pushed object...)
           </div></s:push></s:iterator>
</s:iterator>

that is not readable, hard to mantain and understand, etc...

The solution i found:

use HTML comments to connect the end of one div to the begin of the next one!

<s:iterator begin="0" end="6" status="ctrDay">
   <br/>
   <s:iterator begin="0" end="23" status="ctrHour"><!--
    --><s:push value="%{days[#ctrDay.index].hours[#ctrHour.index]}"><!--
        --><div class="inlineBlock>
                I'm an inline-block div in a matrix             
                (Do something here with the pushed object...)
           </div><!--
    --></s:push><!--
--></s:iterator>
</s:iterator>

This way you will have a readable and correctly indented code.

And, as a positive side effect, the HTML source, although infested by empty comments, will result correctly indented;

let's take the first example, imho this:

    <div class="inlineBlock">
        I'm an inline-block div
    </div><!--
 --><div class="inlineBlock">
        I'm an inline-block div
    </div>

is better than this

    <div class="inlineBlock">
         I'm an inline-block div
    </div><div class="inlineBlock">
         I'm an inline-block div
    </div>

Hope that helps...

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is a fine approach :-) –  Šime Vidas Feb 8 '13 at 18:26
    
This technique doesn't work for DIVs on IE8. It only works for SPAN or other natural inline tags. –  ricosrealm Mar 16 '13 at 2:24
    
The technique is about avoiding THE EXTRA SPACES put by browsers when two inline-block elements are put one after the other. IE8 problem is not the extra-space: IE8 problem is that he handle inline-block on DIVs as BLOCK, not as INLINE. Open this with IE8 or IE9 in IE8 compatibility mode: jsbin.com/ujilav/1 –  Andrea Ligios Mar 16 '13 at 12:35
1  
IE8+ in their normal mode support inline-block for all elements. It's IE7- (and IE7 Emulation mode of newer versions) problem with inline-block for "natively block-level" elements. But there is an easy workaround for this — display: inline + any property that triggers 'hasLayout' (e.g. zoom: 1). –  Ilya Streltsyn Jul 24 '13 at 2:32
    
Thank you @IlyaStreltsyn, useful informations –  Andrea Ligios Jul 24 '13 at 7:54
show 3 more comments

Add comments between elements to NOT have a white space. For me it is easier than resetting font size to zero and then setting it back.

<div>
    Element 1
</div><!--
--><div>
    Element 2
</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Have you read my answer ? :) –  Andrea Ligios Mar 14 '13 at 10:33
    
No I skimmed it :) –  Radek Mar 14 '13 at 12:21
1  
This answer is short and directly to the point. This is the technique I've been using. –  hasenj May 21 '13 at 6:25
add comment

Try adding float:left; http://jsfiddle.net/dGHFV/3/

share|improve this answer
17  
that removes the problem but doesn't solve it - float is not inline-block; the two work very differently, and they both have their own issues. If you switch to float, you'll be swapping one set of issues for another. –  Spudley Feb 22 '11 at 12:48
4  
I think float implicitly changes the display style to block. –  Salman A Feb 22 '11 at 12:59
1  
@Spudley - While I agree that these are two totally different approaches, it DOES solve the problem in this context and therefore is a viable solution. –  SimonDowdles Feb 22 '11 at 13:00
1  
@Salman A - Correct, while a span element is an inline element, it will be converted to a block element. If using this as a form of navigation tabs (which is what this appears to be??) then you're safe. If you're using these span elements inline with text then float will move them all the way to the left (or right) and hence interrupt the flow of your content. –  SimonDowdles Feb 22 '11 at 13:01
    
Inline-blocks live in the inline formatting context, that means they behave like the words in the text and obey the rules of text formatting (text-align, including centering and justifying, vertical-align, white-space, line-height etc.). Floats are taken out of the normal flow and belong to the block formatting context (although obey their own rules of formatting), so swiching to floats simply destroys inline-blocks and takes away all their advantages. –  Ilya Streltsyn Jul 24 '13 at 1:34
add comment

Why not use flexbox and do a fallback (from suggestions above) for older browsers.

ul {
    display: -webkit-box;
    display: -moz-box;
    display: -ms-flexbox;
    display: -webkit-flex;
    display: flex;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

This is the same answer I gave over on the related: Display: Inline block - What is that space?

There’s actually a really simple way to remove whitespace from inline-block that’s both easy and semantic. It’s called a custom font with zero-width spaces, which allows you to collapse the whitespace (added by the browser for inline elements when they're on separate lines) at the font level using a very tiny font. Once you declare the font, you just change the font-family on the container and back again on the children, and voila. Like this:

@font-face{ 
    font-family: 'NoSpace';
    src: url('../Fonts/zerowidthspaces.eot');
    src: url('../Fonts/zerowidthspaces.eot?#iefix') format('embedded-opentype'),
         url('../Fonts/zerowidthspaces.woff') format('woff'),
         url('../Fonts/zerowidthspaces.ttf') format('truetype'),
         url('../Fonts/zerowidthspaces.svg#NoSpace') format('svg');
}

body {
    font-face: 'OpenSans', sans-serif;
}

.inline-container {
    font-face: 'NoSpace';
}

.inline-container > * {
    display: inline-block;
    font-face: 'OpenSans', sans-serif;
}

Suit to taste. Here’s a download to the font I just cooked up in font-forge and converted with FontSquirrel webfont generator. Took me all of 5 minutes. The css @font-face declaration is included: zipped zero-width space font. It's in Google Drive so you'll need to click File > Download to save it to your computer. You'll probably need to change the font paths as well if you copy the declaration to your main css file.

share|improve this answer
    
I saw you post this in CSS Tricks I think, and for me this is a great answer. It's lightweight, easy to implement and cross-browser (so far as my tests have shown). I was totally going with flexbox until I realised that Firefox won't support flex-wrap until at least v28 (srsly?), but this is a perfect fallback until then. –  indextwo Jan 23 at 21:03
    
This is a really novel concept, thanks for demonstrating this! –  Shalom Aptekar 2 days ago
add comment

font-size:0; can be a bit trickier to manage...

I think the following couple lines is a lot better and more re-usable, and time saver than any other methods. I personally use this:

.inline-block-wrapper>.inline-block-wrapper,
.inline-block-wrapper{letter-spacing: -4px;}
.inline-block-wrapper>*{letter-spacing: 0;display: inline-block;}

/* OR better shorter name...*/
.items>.items,
.items{letter-spacing: -4px;}
.items>*{letter-spacing: 0;display: inline-block;}

Then you can use it as following...

<ul class="items">
   <li>Item 1</li>
   <li>Item 2</li>
   <li>Item 3</li>
</ul>

As far I as I know (I may be wrong) but all browsers support this method.

EXPLANATION:

This works (maybe -3px may be better) exactly as you would anticipate it to work.

  • you copy and paste the code (once)
  • then on your html just use class="items" on the parent of each inline-block.

You will NOT have the need to go back to the css, and add another css rule, for your new inline blocks.

Solving two issues at once.

Also note the > (greater than sign) this means that */all children should be inline-block.

http://jsfiddle.net/fD5u3/

NOTE: I have modified to accommodate to inherit letter-spacing when a wrapper has a child wrapper.

share|improve this answer
    
can you add a jsfiddle ? –  Jeanluca Scaljeri Mar 11 at 19:34
add comment

I had this problem right now and from font-size:0; i've found that in IE7 the problem remains because IE thinks "Font Size 0?!?! WTF are you crazy man?" - So, in my case i've Eric Meyer's CSS reset and with font-size:0.01em; I have a difference of 1px from IE7 to FF9, so, I think this can be a solution.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I’ve been tackling this recently and instead of setting the parent font-size:0 then setting the child back to a reasonable value, I’ve been getting consistent results by setting the parent container letter-spacing:-.25em then the child back to letter-spacing:normal.

In an alternate thread I saw a commenter mention that font-size:0 isn’t always ideal because people can control minimum font sizes in their browsers, completely negating the possibility of setting the font-size to zero.

Using ems appears to work regardless of whether the font-size specified is 100%, 15pt or 36px.

http://cdpn.io/dKIjo

share|improve this answer
    
In Firefox for Android, I see a 1px space between the boxes. –  Šime Vidas Oct 2 '13 at 15:23
add comment

b/c i was still seeing the blasted space between inline-block elements in Safari 5, i had to switch to floating the span elements. i still needed to center them though, so I ended up needing to add an extra wrapping div. combined that w/ the font-size and it seems to work on IE7-9, FF, Chrome and Safari.

check out my fiddle

http://jsfiddle.net/KKzuz/3/

share|improve this answer
add comment

The two highest-voted solutions here, the font-size: 0; and the Yahoo Grids one, both come with their shortcomings. font-size: 0; doesn't work in Safari 5 and has strong side effects as mentioned in one of the comments. The Yahoo Grids solution doesn't work out of the box in Chrome 25 (I suspect that it's lack of standardization of em sizes in my project, which is something I'd rather not get into).

So my conslusion is that there's no reliable CSS-only solution. I'm sticking to removing the HTML whitespaces.

share|improve this answer
add comment

try to write like this:

<p>
    <span> Foo </span><span> Bar </span>
</p>
share|improve this answer
add comment

Two more options based on CSS Text Module Level 3 (instead of white-space-collapsing:discard which had been dropped from the spec draft):

  • word-spacing: -100%;

In theory, should do exactly what is needed — shorten whitespaces between 'words' by the 100% of the space character width, i.e. to zero. But seems not to work anywhere, unfortunately, and this feature is marked 'at risk' (it can be dropped from the spec, too).

  • word-spacing: -1ch;

Shortens the inter-word spaces by the width of the digit '0'. In monospace font it should be exactly equal to the width of the space character (and any other character as well). This works in Firefox 10+, Chrome 27+, and almost works in IE9+

Fiddle

share|improve this answer
add comment

How about word-spacing: -16px; I guest default browser font is 16px, I'm not really sure though since there are mobile browser and such as.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I set the style of the second span to margin-left:-3px. That works in IE, Chrome, and Mozilla.

share|improve this answer
5  
The amount of space depends on the font size, so it's not always 3px. For instance, in the example from my question, it's 4px. –  Šime Vidas Feb 14 '12 at 19:41
    
Ever tried it on a 300 dpi mobile display? I guess it will be much more. Using px with fonts is one of the most stupid ideas. –  ceving May 11 '13 at 15:03
add comment

Remember that the CSS style display:inline-block; is not well supported by older IE browsers (but then again what is??). A simple solution would simple be to float the elements left and not clear them.

See http://jsfiddle.net/dGHFV/13/ for complete code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.