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Most people use the terms "folder" and "directory" interchangeably. From a programmer point of view, is there a difference, and if so, what is it? Does it depend on the OS, or is there a broad, general consensus? This at least suggests that there is a difference.

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As for why this question belongs on SO and is not a dupe, please see meta.stackexchange.com/questions/79773/… –  mafu Feb 22 '11 at 13:21
    
But there's also programmers.stackexchange.com –  user332325 Feb 22 '11 at 13:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Check "The folder metaphor" section at Wikipedia

It states:

"Strictly speaking, there is a difference between a directory which is a file system concept, and the graphical user interface metaphor that is used to represent it (a folder). For example, Microsoft Windows uses the concept of special folders to help present the contents of the computer to the user in a fairly consistent way that frees the user from having to deal with absolute directory paths, which can vary between versions of Windows, and between individual installations.

If one is referring to a container of documents, the term folder is more appropriate. The term directory refers to the way a structured list of document files and folders is stored on the computer. It is comparable to a telephone directory that contains lists of names, numbers and addresses and does not contain the actual documents themselves."

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+ Never knew they can be an answer for difference between a directory and a folder? –  Baba Oct 20 '12 at 10:58

A folder is not necessarily a physical directory on a disk. It can be, for example, the printers folder or control panel folder in Windows.

Raymond Chen explains:

Windows 95 introduced Windows Explorer and along with it the term folder. What is the relationship between folders and directories?

Some people believe that Windows 95 renamed directories to folders, but it's actually more than that.

Windows Explorer lets you view folders, which are containers in the shell namespace. Directories are one type of folder, namely, folders which correspond to file system locations. There are other types of folders, such as Control Panel or Network Neighborhood or Printers. These other types of folders represent objects in the shell namespace which do not correspond to files. In common usage, the term virtual folder has been applied to refer to folders which are not directories. In other words, we have this Euler diagram:

(Virtual folders = Folders − Directories)

In general, code which manipulates the shell namespace should operate on folders and items, not directories and files, so as not to tie themselves to a particular storage medium. For example, code which limits itself to files won't be able to navigate into a Zip file, since the contents of a Zip file are exposed in the form of a virtual folder.

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For nitpicking, generally /proc is not on the disk either. –  naxa Apr 3 '13 at 15:00

Quoting Álvaro G. Vicario:

Most of the times they are interchangeable terms. Directory is a classical term used since the early times of file systems while folder is a sort of friendly name which may sound more familiar to Windows users.

The main difference is that a folder is a logical concept that does not necessarily map to a physical directory. A directory is an file system object. A folder is a GUI object. Wikipedia explains it this way:

The name folder, presenting an analogy to the file folder used in offices, and used originally by Apple Lisa, is used in almost all modern operating systems' desktop environments. Folders are often depicted with icons which visually resemble physical file folders.

Strictly speaking, there is a difference between a directory which is a file system concept, and the graphical user interface metaphor that is used to represent it (a folder). For example, Microsoft Windows uses the concept of special folders to help present the contents of the computer to the user in a fairly consistent way that frees the user from having to deal with absolute directory paths, which can vary between versions of Windows, and between individual installations.

If one is referring to a container of documents, the term folder is more appropriate. The term directory refers to the way a structured list of document files and folders is stored on the computer. It is comparable to a telephone directory that contains lists of names, numbers and addresses and does not contain the actual documents themselves.

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Your link basically describes what is different on a technical basis. Most of the times People use them interchangeably and which they choose is mostly based on what environment they come from.

Unless you are doing development cross-platform for an application that will modify files, you don't need to know the differences. As soon as you are preparing to work with several different file system types, you should know their differences.

Don't expect people to know which term to use when. I think of those terms as interchangable, since the differences are known to too few people.

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That's not what I'm asking though. –  mafu Feb 22 '11 at 16:11

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