Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Effective Java #77 states that we have to use readResolve to preserve the Singleton guarentee during serialization. They have used the example.

public class Elvis implements Serializable{
public static final Elvis INSTANCE = new Elvis();
private Elvis() { ... }
public void leaveTheBuilding() { ... }

and they suggest using

If the Elvis class is made to implement Serializable, the following readResolve method suffices to guarantee the singleton property:

// readResolve for instance control - you can do better!
private Object readResolve() {
// Return the one true Elvis and let the garbage collector
// take care of the Elvis impersonator.
return INSTANCE; }

This method ignores the deserialized object, returning the distinguished Elvis instance that was created when the class was initialized.

  • Now the question is does serialization loads the class again to have two instance of Elvis?
  • If the class is loaded only once then we should be having only one instance of Elvis since static fields are not serialized and are not restored during deserialization and
  • From where does the other Elvis instance comes which is made eligble for garbage collection by readResolve (prevented from escaping the deserializtaion process). Can this be explained?
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

I'd suggest creating a proxy class inside your singleton class to hold all of your variables. Then you can have accessor functions [getProxyClass() & setProxyClass()]. Make the proxy class serializable, then when you go to serialize or deserialize use the proxy class and just use the accessor functions to get or set it. If you do it this way it cuts out a lot of the mess involved with the singleton class.

share|improve this answer
add comment
  • Now the question is does serialization loads the class again to have two instance of Elvis?

A new instance of Elvis is created (the impersonator), but the overloaded readResolve method ensures that it is not returned as part of the data structure returned by ObjectInputStream.readObject().

The Elvis impersonator is (or soon becomes) unreachable, and is garbage collected.

  • If the class is loaded only once then we should be having only one instance of Elvis since static fields are not serialized and are not restored during deserialization and

Ideally yes. In practice no.

  • From where does the other Elvis instance comes which is made eligible for garbage collection by readResolve (prevented from escaping the deserialization process). Can this be explained?

The deserialization process starts out by creating the 2nd Elvis (the impersonator), but the readResolve method ensures that nothing ever sees it.

To understand how and why that is the case, you need to understand the function that a readResolve() method plays in deserialization, as specified here. Basically, when the readResolve() method returns INSTANCE it is saying, "wherever you were going to use the impersonator in the graph we are building, use the real Elvis instead".

share|improve this answer
    
@Stephen C The Elvis impersonator becomes unreachable, unless an adversary grabs a reference to it first. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 22 '11 at 14:32
    
@Stephen C - "The deserialization process starts out by creating the 2nd Elvis (the impersonator)" - Does it create another object and assign a new value for the static field INSTANCE? Static fields are not serialized and they are initialized when loading the class loads I guess. –  tutysara Feb 22 '11 at 16:28
    
@Tom - I thought that's what I said. –  Stephen C Feb 22 '11 at 21:25
    
@tutysara - yes, a 2nd Elvis is created. No, it does not assign the new Elvis to a static. The normal object serialization mechanisms are not aware of statics, and Elvis's class-specific hooks (e.g. its readResolve method) don't assign to INSTANCE. –  Stephen C Feb 22 '11 at 21:28
    
@Stephen C You said "is (or soon becomes) unreachable" and I say it ain't necessarily so. (Also readResolve is (not necessarily) overloaded or even overridden.) –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 22 '11 at 22:40
show 3 more comments
  • The class is only loaded once (unless you muck about with class loaders, but then the classes are actually different). Deserialisation of the above code does indeed create a new Elvis. You would need to use a serial proxy to avoid that.

  • Whilst there are two Elvis instances, Elvis.INSTANCE only points to one.

  • Deserialisation constructs an object without calling executing any constructors of serialisable classes (it does however execute the no-arg constructor of the most derived non-serialisable base class).

(And btw, you've not made your class final, so even a subclass can be deserialised. And, incidentally, your proposed readResolve method would not be called for a subclass as it is private.)

share|improve this answer
    
@Tom - according to the object serialization spec, the readResolve method can have any access modifier. It can be private. –  Stephen C Feb 22 '11 at 14:17
    
@Stephen I don't think that's true for a private method in a superclass –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 22 '11 at 14:27
1  
@Stephen C "This writeReplace method is invoked by serialization if the method exists and it would be accessible from a method defined within the class of the object being serialized." [from java.io.Serializable] So for a subclass, a private method would not be accessible (it's not going to follow rules for nested classes either...). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 22 '11 at 14:28
    
@Tom - "Deserialisation of the above code does indeed create a new Elvis" - Did you mean a new object of type Elvis is created and all the non-static and non-transient fields are populated with values from the deserialization process? In that case how do we have two values for the public static final filed INSTANCE? –  tutysara Feb 22 '11 at 16:31
    
@tutysara INSTANCE only points to one instance. One instance of Elvis is the original, and the other is the one you would normally expect from the deserialisation process, which has readResolve called on it (unless it is a subclass). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 22 '11 at 16:39
show 7 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.