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I have to invoke a PowerShell script from a batch file. One of the arguments to the script is a boolean value:

C:\Windows\System32\WindowsPowerShell\v1.0\powershell.exe -NoProfile -File .\RunScript.ps1 -Turn 1 -Unify $false

The command fails with the following error:

Cannot process argument transformation on parameter 'Unify'. Cannot convert value "System.String" to type "System.Boolean", parameters of this type only accept booleans or numbers, use $true, $false, 1 or 0 instead.

At line:0 char:1
+  <<<< <br/>
+ CategoryInfo          : InvalidData: (:) [RunScript.ps1], ParentContainsErrorRecordException <br/>
+ FullyQualifiedErrorId : ParameterArgumentTransformationError,RunScript.ps1

As of now I am using a string to boolean conversion inside my script. But how can I pass boolean arguments to PowerShell?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It appears that powershell.exe does not fully evaluate script arguments when the -File parameter is used. In particular, the $false argument is being treated as a string value, in a similar way to the example below:

PS> function f( [bool]$b ) { $b }; f -b '$false'
f : Cannot process argument transformation on parameter 'b'. Cannot convert value 
"System.String" to type "System.Boolean", parameters of this type only accept 
booleans or numbers, use $true, $false, 1 or 0 instead.
At line:1 char:36
+ function f( [bool]$b ) { $b }; f -b <<<<  '$false'
    + CategoryInfo          : InvalidData: (:) [f], ParentContainsErrorRecordException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : ParameterArgumentTransformationError,f

Instead of using -File you could try -Command, which will evaluate the call as script:

CMD> powershell.exe -NoProfile -Command .\RunScript.ps1 -Turn 1 -Unify $false
Turn: 1
Unify: False

As David suggests, using a switch argument would also be more idiomatic, simplifying the call by removing the need to pass a boolean value explicitly:

CMD> powershell.exe -NoProfile -File .\RunScript.ps1 -Turn 1 -Unify
Turn: 1
Unify: True
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2  
For those (like me) who have to keep the "-File" parameter, and can't change to a switch argument, but do have control over the string values that are sent, then the simplest solution is to convert the parameter to a boolean using [System.Convert]::ToBoolean($Unify); the string values must then be "True" or "False". –  Hainesy Apr 16 '13 at 8:44

A more clear usage might be to use switch parameters instead. Then, just the existence of the Unify parameter would mean it was set.

Like so:

param (
  [int] $Turn,
  [switch] $Unify
)
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2  
This should be the accepted answer. To further the discussion, you can set a default value like any other parameter like so: [switch] $Unify = $false –  Mario Tacke May 14 at 22:00

Try setting the type of your parameter to [bool]:

param
(
    [int]$Turn = 0
    [bool]$Unity = $false
)

switch ($Unity)
{
    $true { "That was true."; break }
    default { "Whatever it was, it wasn't true."; break }
}

This example defaults $Unity to $false if no input is provided.

Usage

.\RunScript.ps1 -Turn 1 -Unity $false
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1  
This doesn't work with the -File parameter –  Hainesy Apr 16 '13 at 8:41
    
Emperor XLII's answer and your comment on it regarding the -File parameter should cover every aspect of the original question. I'll leave my answer because someone may also find my hint on providing a default value useful. –  Filburt Apr 16 '13 at 19:24
    
fair enough! :-) –  Hainesy Apr 17 '13 at 20:42

You can also use 0 for False or 1 for True. It actual suggests that in the error message:

Cannot process argument transformation on parameter 'Unify'. Cannot convert value "System.String" to type "System.Boolean", parameters of this type only accept booleans or numbers, use $true, $false, 1 or 0 instead.

See the following Link for more details http://blogs.msdn.com/b/powershell/archive/2006/12/24/boolean-values-and-operators.aspx.

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1  
That does not work. It is expecting integer number 1 or 0, but passing it through -File interprets it as string, thus fails with same error. –  Erti-Chris Eelmaa Apr 20 at 9:10

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