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My problem is in trying to solve a Binary Integer Program through Java. I want to run a series of experiments and an integral component of these experiments is to solve an integer program where the variables are constrained to be between 0 and 1.

In the past I have solved such problems in MatLab, with the function bintprog. In the search for such a function (or class? I'm very new to Java) to use in Java, I have come up empty handed.

Is there a Java library available to solve Integer Programs that has really good documentation?

In my search, I have seen suggestions to use a package called LP_Solve that has had a Java wrapper built around it, and a similar wrapper built for a package called GLPK (wrappers here and here) (which I have used before). The problem with these tools is that they are not strictly designed for Java, and thusly, lack the kind of documentation that I feel I need, and even worse have complicated instructions to even begin using them in my own code. As I am currently learning the Java language I am wondering if there are any really good packages available to solve Binary Integer Programs, Mixed Integer Linear Programs, or just Integer Programs from my own Java code.

As a side note, I really do not want to switch to another language because I am building off of past code and classes that perform the tasks I desire.

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Java is general-purpose language. MatLab is a mathematics programming language. You will need to roll your own functionality, or find a 3rd-party library to do your calculations. –  mellamokb Feb 22 '11 at 15:17
    
So, you are looking for a Java version of MATLAB's bigintprog? –  Matt Ball Feb 22 '11 at 15:24
    
@Matt Ball That is exactly what I am looking for. A library that will do the trick and that has good documentation on how to implement the procedure. Thank you for the opportunity to clarify my question. –  Walter Feb 22 '11 at 15:26
    
@Walter: then you should clarify your question to say that. Remove the chaff, and ask what you mean. –  Matt Ball Feb 22 '11 at 15:28
    
@Matt Does my latest edit improve the quality of my question? I want to be sure that people can get to the heart of my question, but still have the ability to see some of the background for it. –  Walter Feb 22 '11 at 15:36

3 Answers 3

How about Java Integer Linear Program Solver (JILPS)?

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I was really hopeful about this, but JILPS does not seem to be a complete project. It seems more like a working project with no available downloads or related information. Thank you though, and please feel free to correct me if I am missing something obvious in the link! –  Walter Feb 22 '11 at 16:33
    
@Walter: It seems like the code is well-documented, but you'll have to do a checkout rather than a download. For an example, see this test program: code.google.com/p/jilps/source/browse/trunk/src/jilps/cop4j/… –  Mark Elliot Feb 22 '11 at 17:17

LP_Solve with the Java wrapper is what I will be using. It is a free Mixed Integer Linear Program solver. LP_Solve for Java is very easy to install following these instructions. Included in the packages you download are files with lots of example code, which I have found useful. The only part of the installation that slowed me down was having to join the Yahoo group to find the files for download.

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if you want values 0 or 1 try the bool datatype...if your looking at probabilities (that lie between 0 to 1)try limiting a float value such that it is >= 0 and <=1;

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Thank you for your answer, but it really does not address my question. I have edited my question to try and clarify what I am looking for. –  Walter Feb 22 '11 at 15:44

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