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I got the following css:

#navlist li #current
{
  color: #000;
  background: #FFFFFF;
  border-bottom: 1px solid #FFFFFF;
}

I need to change that #current element into a class in order to assign it dynamically to the right li.

How can I translate the code above into a .current with the same result and still applying only to #navlist li elements.

I'm really not good at css and I'm not sure how to write this. (I've tried ways without much success)

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Is the space between li and #current intended? Because like that, the element with the id current inside a li element is affected, whereas per your description you want to affect the li element itself. Also converting id to class is usually just changing # to .. –  poke Feb 22 '11 at 15:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I'm not sure I understand your question, but the main difference between IDs and classes is that IDs have to be unique in your page. So as long as there is only one element with the id="current", everything is fine. If you need more than one, change it to class="current" for all of them.

In CSS, you will set properties for the ID with #current {...} and for the class(es) with .current {...}

Hope it helps.

Update: Depending on your HTML structure, what you need is either #navlist li.current (for li's with the class current) or #navlist li .current (for child elements - like a div - of li's). In this case the CSS will apply ONLY to elements with class current inside the navlist div.

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Thanks a lot everyone for the help. The thing is, I needed to have what you mention child elements like a div of li's. I didn't know there was a difference between #navlist li.current and #navlist li .current. I've learned something very valuable. Thanks again. –  ndefontenay Feb 22 '11 at 15:47

EDIT: The code below should work.

#navlist li {
    color: #000;
    background: #FFFFFF;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #FFFFFF;
}
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ok. I could figure this one out x) More precisely, I want this to apply only to #navlist li elements. –  ndefontenay Feb 22 '11 at 15:31
    
Ok well then you could simply do #navlist li {css}. –  Kevin Gurney Feb 22 '11 at 15:32
    
ok. the truth is, I'm plain stupid with css, so in my mind, if I set this class like this and I have another .current somewhere else, it will apply there too. I want to confine the class to #navlist li elements only, so that if a <div class="current"> has it, it won't apply to it. So, would simply writing it after the #navlist id css entry be enough? –  ndefontenay Feb 22 '11 at 15:34
    
If you want to apply only to #navlist li elements use this: #navlist li.current and set class="current" on the li elements you want –  Cristian Radu Feb 22 '11 at 15:35
    
I'll accept your answer in a few. Thanks for the help. It worked out with #navlist li.current –  ndefontenay Feb 22 '11 at 15:39

Try:

#navlist li {
   // styles here
}
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Kevin got there ahead of me. –  biscuitstack Feb 22 '11 at 15:37

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