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How can I configure JPA/Hibernate to store a date/time in the database as UTC (GMT) time zone? Consider this annotated JPA entity:

public class Event {
    @Id
    public int id;

    @Temporal(TemporalType.TIMESTAMP)
    public java.util.Date date;
}

If the date is 2008-Feb-03 9:30am Pacific Standard Time (PST), then I want the UTC time of 2008-Feb-03 5:30pm stored in the database. Likewise, when the date is retrieved from the database, I want it interpreted as UTC. So in this case 530pm is 530pm UTC. When it's displayed it will be formatted as 9:30am PST.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 21 down vote accepted

To the best of my knowledge, you need to put your entire java app in UTC timezone (so that hibernate will store dates in UTC), and you'll need to convert to whatever timezone desired when you display stuff (at least we do it this way).

At startup, we do:

TimeZone.setDefault(TimeZone.getTimeZone("Etc/UTC"));

and set the desired timezone to the DateFormat:

fmt.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("Europe/Budapest"))

Hope this helps,
cheers,
mitch

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2  
mitchnull, your solution won't work in all cases because Hibernate delegates setting dates to the JDBC driver and each JDBC driver handles dates and time zones differently. see stackoverflow.com/questions/4123534/…. –  Derek Mahar Nov 10 '10 at 19:39
    
But if I start my app informing to the JVM "-Duser.timezone=+00:00" property, is not the same behave? –  rafa.ferreira May 19 '11 at 21:34
3  
As far as I can tell, it will work in all cases except when the JVM and the database server are in different time zones. –  Shane Sep 18 '11 at 8:29
    
stevekuo and @mitchnull see divestoclimb solution below which is far more better and side-effect proof stackoverflow.com/a/3430957/233906 –  Cerber Apr 22 '12 at 14:19
    
Do HibernateJPA support "@Factory" and "@Externalizer" annotation, it's how I do datetime utc handling in OpenJPA library. stackoverflow.com/questions/10819862/… –  Whome Apr 24 '13 at 0:43

Hibernate is ignorant of time zone stuff in Dates (because there isn't any), but it's actually the JDBC layer that's causing problems. ResultSet.getTimestamp and PreparedStatement.setTimestamp both say in their docs that they transform dates to/from the current JVM timezone by default when reading and writing from/to the database.

I came up with a solution to this in Hibernate 3.5 by subclassing org.hibernate.type.TimestampType that forces these JDBC methods to use UTC instead of the local time zone:

public class UtcTimestampType extends TimestampType {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 8088663383676984635L;

    private static final TimeZone UTC = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");

    @Override
    public Object get(ResultSet rs, String name) throws SQLException {
        return rs.getTimestamp(name, Calendar.getInstance(UTC));
    }

    @Override
    public void set(PreparedStatement st, Object value, int index) throws SQLException {
        Timestamp ts;
        if(value instanceof Timestamp) {
            ts = (Timestamp) value;
        } else {
            ts = new Timestamp(((java.util.Date) value).getTime());
        }
        st.setTimestamp(index, ts, Calendar.getInstance(UTC));
    }
}

The same thing should be done to fix TimeType and DateType if you use those types. The downside is you'll have to manually specify that these types are to be used instead of the defaults on every Date field in your POJOs (and also breaks pure JPA compatibility), unless someone knows of a more general override method.

UPDATE: Hibernate 3.6 has changed the types API. In 3.6, I wrote a class UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor to implement this.

public class UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor extends TimestampTypeDescriptor {
    public static final UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor INSTANCE = new UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor();

    private static final TimeZone UTC = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");

    public <X> ValueBinder<X> getBinder(final JavaTypeDescriptor<X> javaTypeDescriptor) {
        return new BasicBinder<X>( javaTypeDescriptor, this ) {
            @Override
            protected void doBind(PreparedStatement st, X value, int index, WrapperOptions options) throws SQLException {
                st.setTimestamp( index, javaTypeDescriptor.unwrap( value, Timestamp.class, options ), Calendar.getInstance(UTC) );
            }
        };
    }

    public <X> ValueExtractor<X> getExtractor(final JavaTypeDescriptor<X> javaTypeDescriptor) {
        return new BasicExtractor<X>( javaTypeDescriptor, this ) {
            @Override
            protected X doExtract(ResultSet rs, String name, WrapperOptions options) throws SQLException {
                return javaTypeDescriptor.wrap( rs.getTimestamp( name, Calendar.getInstance(UTC) ), options );
            }
        };
    }
}

Now when the app starts, if you set TimestampTypeDescriptor.INSTANCE to an instance of UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor, all timestamps will be stored and treated as being in UTC without having to change the annotations on POJOs. [I haven't tested this yet]

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3  
How do you tell Hibernate to use your custom UtcTimestampType? –  Derek Mahar Nov 7 '10 at 11:40
    
divestoclimb, with which version of Hibernate is UtcTimestampType compatible? –  Derek Mahar Nov 10 '10 at 19:16
2  
"ResultSet.getTimestamp and PreparedStatement.setTimestamp both say in their docs that they transform dates to/from the current JVM timezone by default when reading and writing from/to the database." Do you have a reference? I don't see any mention of this in the Java 6 Javadocs for these methods. According to stackoverflow.com/questions/4123534/…, how these methods apply the time zone to a given Date or Timestamp is JDBC driver dependent. –  Derek Mahar Nov 10 '10 at 19:24
1  
I could have sworn I read that about using the JVM timezone last year, but now I can't find it. I might have found it on the docs for a specific JDBC driver and generalized. –  divestoclimb Jul 12 '11 at 15:11
2  
To get the 3.6 version of your example to work i had to create a new type which was basically a wrapper around the TimeStampType then set that type on the field. –  Shaun Stone Jul 12 '12 at 22:42

You would think this common problem would be taken care of by Hibernate. But its not! There are a few "hacks" to get it right.

The one I use is to store the Date as a Long in the database. So I am always working with milliseconds after 1/1/70. I then have getters and setters on my Class that return/accept only Dates. So the API remains the same. The down side is that I have longs in the database. SO with SQL I can pretty much only do <,>,= comparisons -- not fancy date operators.

Another approach is to user a custom mapping type as described here: http://www.hibernate.org/100.html

I think the correct way to deal with this is to use a Calendar instead of a Date though. With the Calendar you can set the TimeZone before persisting.

NOTE: Silly stackoverflow won't let me comment, so here is a response to david a.

If you create this object in Chicago:

new Date(0);

Hibernate persists it as "12/31/1969 18:00:00". Dates should be devoid of timezone, so I'm not sure why the adjustment would be made.

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1  
Shame on me! You were right and the link from your post explains it well. Now I guess my answer deserves some negative reputation :) –  david a. Feb 17 '09 at 19:12
1  
Not at all. you encouraged me to post a very explicit example of why this is a problem. –  joekutner Feb 18 '09 at 22:15
4  
I was able to persist times correctly using the Calendar object so that they are stored in the DB as UTC as you suggested. However, when reading persisted entities back from the database, Hibernate assumes they're in the local time zone and the Calendar object is incorrect! –  John K Apr 16 '10 at 16:12
1  
John K, in order to resolve this Calendar read problem, I think Hibernate or JPA should provide some way to specify, for each mapping, the time zone to which Hibernate should translate the date that it reads and writes to a TIMESTAMP column. –  Derek Mahar Nov 7 '10 at 11:44
    
joekutner, after reading stackoverflow.com/questions/4123534/…, I've come to share your opinion that we should store milliseconds since the Epoch in the database rather than a Timestamp since we can't necessarily trust the JDBC driver to store dates as we would expect. –  Derek Mahar Nov 10 '10 at 19:44

Adding an answer that's completely based on and indebted to divestoclimb with a hint from Shaun Stone. Just wanted to spell it out in detail since it's a common problem and the solution is a bit confusing.

This is using Hibernate 4.1.4.Final, though I suspect anything after 3.6 will work.

First, create divestoclimb's UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor

public class UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor extends TimestampTypeDescriptor {
    public static final UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor INSTANCE = new UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor();

    private static final TimeZone UTC = TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC");

    public <X> ValueBinder<X> getBinder(final JavaTypeDescriptor<X> javaTypeDescriptor) {
        return new BasicBinder<X>( javaTypeDescriptor, this ) {
            @Override
            protected void doBind(PreparedStatement st, X value, int index, WrapperOptions options) throws SQLException {
                st.setTimestamp( index, javaTypeDescriptor.unwrap( value, Timestamp.class, options ), Calendar.getInstance(UTC) );
            }
        };
    }

    public <X> ValueExtractor<X> getExtractor(final JavaTypeDescriptor<X> javaTypeDescriptor) {
        return new BasicExtractor<X>( javaTypeDescriptor, this ) {
            @Override
            protected X doExtract(ResultSet rs, String name, WrapperOptions options) throws SQLException {
                return javaTypeDescriptor.wrap( rs.getTimestamp( name, Calendar.getInstance(UTC) ), options );
            }
        };
    }
}

Then create UtcTimestampType, which uses UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor instead of TimestampTypeDescriptor as the SqlTypeDescriptor in the super constructor call but otherwise delegates everything to TimestampType:

public class UtcTimestampType
        extends AbstractSingleColumnStandardBasicType<Date>
        implements VersionType<Date>, LiteralType<Date> {
    public static final UtcTimestampType INSTANCE = new UtcTimestampType();

    public UtcTimestampType() {
        super( UtcTimestampTypeDescriptor.INSTANCE, JdbcTimestampTypeDescriptor.INSTANCE );
    }

    public String getName() {
        return TimestampType.INSTANCE.getName();
    }

    @Override
    public String[] getRegistrationKeys() {
        return TimestampType.INSTANCE.getRegistrationKeys();
    }

    public Date next(Date current, SessionImplementor session) {
        return TimestampType.INSTANCE.next(current, session);
    }

    public Date seed(SessionImplementor session) {
        return TimestampType.INSTANCE.seed(session);
    }

    public Comparator<Date> getComparator() {
        return TimestampType.INSTANCE.getComparator();        
    }

    public String objectToSQLString(Date value, Dialect dialect) throws Exception {
        return TimestampType.INSTANCE.objectToSQLString(value, dialect);
    }

    public Date fromStringValue(String xml) throws HibernateException {
        return TimestampType.INSTANCE.fromStringValue(xml);
    }
}

Finally, when you initialize your Hibernate configuration, register UtcTimestampType as a type override:

configuration.registerTypeOverride(new UtcTimestampType());

Now timestamps shouldn't be concerned with the JVM's time zone on their way to and from the database. HTH.

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2  
Would be great to see the solution for JPA and Spring Configuration. –  Aubergine Oct 15 '13 at 23:21
    
A note regarding using this approach with native queries within Hibernate. To have these overridden types be used you must set the value with query.setParameter(int pos, Object value), not query.setParameter(int pos, Date value, TemporalType temporalType). If you use the latter then Hibernate will use its original type implementations, as they are hard coded. –  Nigel Jan 15 at 0:14
    
Where should I call the statement configuration.registerTypeOverride(new UtcTimestampType()); ? –  Stony Feb 21 at 16:22
    
@Stony Wherever you initialize your Hibernate configuration. If you have a HibernateUtil (most do), it'll be in there. –  Shane Feb 21 at 19:43

There are several timezones in operation here:

  1. Java's Date classes (util and sql), which have implicit timezones of UTC
  2. The timezone your JVM is running in, and
  3. the default timezone of your database server.

All of these can be different. Hibernate/JPA has a severe design deficiency in that a user cannot easily ensure that timezone information is preserved in the database server (which allows reconstruction of correct times and dates in the JVM).

Without the ability to (easily) store timezone using JPA/Hibernate then information is lost and once information is lost it becomes expensive to construct it (if at all possible).

I would argue that it is better to always store timezone information (should be the default) and users should then have the optional ability to optimize the timezone away (although it only really affects display, there is still an implicit timezone in any date).

Sorry, this post doesn't provide a work-around (that's been answered elsewhere) but it is a rationalization of why always storing timezone information around is important. Unfortunately it seems many Computer Scientists and programming practitioners argue against the need for timezones simply because they don't appreciate the "loss of information" perspective and how that makes things like internationalization very difficult - which is very important these days with web sites accessible by clients and people in your organization as they move around the world.

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1  
"Hibernate/JPA has a severe design deficiency" I'd say it is a deficiency in SQL, which traditionally has allowed the time-zone to be implicit, and therefore potentially anything. Silly SQL. –  Raedwald Jan 31 '12 at 18:06
    
Actually, instead of always storing the timezone, you can also standardize on one timezone (usually UTC), and convert everything to this timezone when persisting (and back when reading). This is what we usually do. However, JDBC does not support that directly either :-/. –  sleske Jun 25 '12 at 15:50

Date is not in any time zone (it is a millisecond office from a defined moment in time same for everyone), but underlying (R)DBs generally store timestamps in political format (year, month, day, hour, minute, second, ...) that is time-zone sensitive.

To be serious, Hibernate MUST be allow being told within some form of mapping that the DB date is in such-and-such timezone so that when it loads or stores it it does not assume its own...

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Please take a look at my project on Sourceforge which has user types for standard SQL Date and Time types as well as JSR 310 and Joda Time. All of the types try to address the offsetting issue. See http://sourceforge.net/projects/usertype/

EDIT: In response to Derek Mahar's question attached to this comment:

"Chris, do your user types work with Hibernate 3 or greater? – Derek Mahar Nov 7 '10 at 12:30"

Yes these types support Hibernate 3.x versions including Hibernate 3.6.

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Chris, do your user types work with Hibernate 3 or greater? –  Derek Mahar Nov 7 '10 at 12:30

Hibernate does not allow for specifying time zones by annotation or any other means. If you use Calendar instead of date, you can implement a workaround using HIbernate property AccessType and implementing the mapping yourself. The more advanced solution is to implement a custom UserType to map your Date or Calendar. Both solutions are explained in this blog post: http://dev-metal.blogspot.com/2010/11/mapping-dates-and-time-zones-with.html

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Why should Hibernate take care of this? The Date instance does carry not any timezone information, its state is only represented by epoch time of a certain moment. If the instance of Date you're trying to save is offset by a timezone shift, then it just means it was instantiated without taking the timezone into account (e.g. while parsing a string or another form user's input, user's timezone was not considered). Below the data abstraction layer, some sort of Hibernate filter may for sure implement a timezone correction, but it would be more appropriate to me to do it when the Date is instantiated.

EDIT: Ok, this is false. See joekutner's comments on above post.

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