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When you create a new EntityCollection object, the connection doesn't attempt to open the database until you try and do something with that collection. I need to determine whether or not an Entity collection has a valid connection or not, and I can't find an efficient method of doing it.

Currently I've got this in my code:

var db = new MyEntityCollection();

try
{
     var checkworking = from c in db.Customers select c;
}
catch 
{ 
     ConnectToBackUp();
}

Which is not only horrible code, but very slow since it waits an age to determine whether or not the connection is active before throwing an exception.

I know I can control how long it waits before giving up by using ConnectionTimeout but that's just another ugly hack that makes a bad situation worse.

Surely there's a better way of doing this?

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4 Answers 4

Are you just wanting to see if the DB connection is valid. If so take a look at the objectcontext.databaseExists().

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Sounds exactly what is needed here! –  YoupTube Feb 22 '11 at 16:06
2  
Looks good, but unfortunately it throws an error: "A network-related or instance-specific error occurred while establishing a connection to SQL Server. The server was not found or was not accessible. Verify that the instance name is correct and that SQL Server is configured to allow remote connections." My solution needs to work if there's no DB server at all as well as if the connection string is merely wrong. –  Matt Thrower Feb 23 '11 at 9:21
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Simplest:

private bool TestConnection()
{
    var db = new MyEntityCollection();
    int oldTimeOut = db.CommandTimeout;

    try
    {
       db.CommandTimeout = 1;
       db.Connection.Open();   // check the database connection
       return true;
    }
    catch 
    { 
       return false;
    }
    finally 
    {
       db.CommandTimeout = oldTimeOut;
    }
}
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up vote 4 down vote accepted

Solved this by going around the houses a bit and building a new connection string to test with ADO. Still involves using a try catch but it's a lot faster:

    private bool TestConnection()
    {
        EntityConnectionStringBuilder b = new EntityConnectionStringBuilder();
        ConnectionStringSettings entityConString = ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings["MyEntityConnectionString"];
        b.ConnectionString = entityConString.ConnectionString;
        string providerConnectionString = b.ProviderConnectionString;

        SqlConnectionStringBuilder conStringBuilder = new SqlConnectionStringBuilder();
        conStringBuilder.ConnectionString = providerConnectionString;
        conStringBuilder.ConnectTimeout = 1;
        string constr = conStringBuilder.ConnectionString;

        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(constr))
        {
            try
            {
                conn.Open();
                return true;
            }
            catch
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
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Was it the need to set a timeout that made this solution necessary? –  froggythefrog Nov 12 '12 at 2:16
1  
@froggythefrog Yes. Otherwise it uses the default, which is too long. –  Matt Thrower Jul 11 at 8:15
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Shouldn't such infrastructure be provided on the network or database server layer? Manually handling connection to backup server looks strange. Moreover it is not possible without waiting for timeout because you must try to open connection to primary server first.

Connection itself is accessible on ObjectContext.Connection. This property should return EntityConnection instance which contains StoreConnection property holding connection to real DB. You can check state of this connection.

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