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This is my first post, so please bear with me. I have a file that looks something like this:

<table name="content_analyzer" primary-key="id">
  <type="global" />
</table>
<table name="content_analyzer2" primary-key="id">
  <type="global" />
</table>
<table name="content_analyzer_items" primary-key="id">
  <type="global" />
</table>

I need to extract anything within the quotes that follow "name=", i.e., content_analyzer , content_analyzer2 and content_analyzer_items.

I am doing this on a Linux box, so a solution using sed, perl, grep or bash is fine.

Thanks!

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3  
no need to be shy, welcome here! –  Benoit Feb 22 '11 at 16:42
3  
I feel that it would be wrong not to link to stackoverflow.com/questions/1732348/… –  Christoffer Hammarström Feb 22 '11 at 16:42
    
Thanks everyone for the useful comments. I apologize for the XML not being properly formatted. I deleted some tags for simplification. –  DrewVS Feb 24 '11 at 15:20

7 Answers 7

up vote 27 down vote accepted

Old Version of the Answer:

I think the easiest one-line solution (without writing a full script) would be to use grep:

grep -no 'name="[^"]*"' file.html

In this line:

  • The n option will print the lines that matched the pattern. Simply for informative reasons, at first glance. Remove if you don't want it.
  • The o option prints only the matched text, not the entire line itself.
  • file.txt is the path to your file.

Also if you want the results saved to a file, you can pipe them by appending > results.txt:

grep -o 'name="[^"]*"' file.html > results.txt

The big problem here is that grep will not support look-arounds (at least I don't think so). Thus, the result will be something like:

name="content_analyzer"
name="content_analyzer2"
name="content_analyzer_items"

It needs some clean up. That's easy to do in your text editor with some find/replace… but that's why it's not a complete solution.


How I would do it

Right in Vim :-)

1st step
Delete any lines that does not contain name=

:v/name=/d

2nd step
Extract the content inside name=""

:%s/^.*name="\([^"]*\)".*$/\1

Bang, not even had to go out of the text editor.


Update

As stated by Dennis Williamson in the comments, grep does have look arounds with the use of the -P option, which according to the manual interprets the pattern as a Perl regular expression. Fantastic...

So here is definitive one-lined solution:

grep -Po 'name="\K.*?(?=")' file.txt
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5  
Lookarounds (in GNU grep): grep -Po '.*name="\K.*?(?=".*)' –  Dennis Williamson Feb 22 '11 at 19:54
    
@Dennis Williamson, great. I updated the answer accordingly, but left both .* aside, I hope you don't get angry with me. I'd like to ask, do you see any benefits from un-greedy match over "anything except ""? Don't take this as a fight, I'm just curious and I'm not a regex expert. Also, the \K tip, really nice. Thanks Dennis. –  sidyll Feb 22 '11 at 23:44
    
Why would I be angry? Without the .*, you can do grep -Po '(?<=name=").*?(?=")'. The \K can be used for shorthand, but it's really only needed if the match to its left is variable length. In cases like this, the reason for using lookarounds is fairly obvious. Ungreedy operations look a little neater ([^"]* versus .*? and you don't have to repeat the anchor character. I don't know about speed. That depends a lot on the context, I think. I hope that's helpful. –  Dennis Williamson Feb 23 '11 at 0:59
    
@Dennis Williamson: certainly sir, a lot of helpful information here. I think the reason I kept the \K (after researching on it) and removed the .* was the same: make it look pretty (simpler). And I've never thought in using .*? instead of the "traditional way" I learned from somewhere. But un-greedy here really makes sense. Thanks Dennis, best wishes. –  sidyll Feb 23 '11 at 1:33
    
Thanks so much. This works perfectly! –  DrewVS Feb 24 '11 at 15:19

The regular expression would be:

.+name="([^"]+)"

Then the grouping would be in the \1

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If you're using Perl, download a module to parse the XML: XML::Simple, XML::Twig, or XML::LibXML. Don't re-invent the wheel.

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1  
Note that example OP gave is not well-formed (<type="global" for instance), so most of XML parsers just complain and die. –  bvr Feb 22 '11 at 17:20

An HTML parser should be used for this purpose rather than regular expressions. A Perl program that makes use of HTML::TreeBuilder:

Program

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use HTML::TreeBuilder;

my $tree = HTML::TreeBuilder->new_from_file( \*DATA );
my @elements = $tree->look_down(
    sub { defined $_[0]->attr('name') }
);

for (@elements) {
    print $_->attr('name'), "\n";
}

__DATA__
<table name="content_analyzer" primary-key="id">
  <type="global" />
</table>
<table name="content_analyzer2" primary-key="id">
  <type="global" />
</table>
<table name="content_analyzer_items" primary-key="id">
  <type="global" />
</table>

Output

content_analyzer
content_analyzer2
content_analyzer_items
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Here's a solution using HTML tidy & xmlstarlet:

htmlstr='
<table name="content_analyzer" primary-key="id">
<type="global" />
</table>
<table name="content_analyzer2" primary-key="id">
<type="global" />
</table>
<table name="content_analyzer_items" primary-key="id">
<type="global" />
</table>
'

echo "$htmlstr" | tidy -q -c -wrap 0 -numeric -asxml -utf8 --merge-divs yes --merge-spans yes 2>/dev/null |
sed '/type="global"/d' |
xmlstarlet sel -N x="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" -T -t -m "//x:table" -v '@name' -n
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Oops, the sed command has to precede the tidy command of course:

echo "$htmlstr" | 
sed '/type="global"/d' |
tidy -q -c -wrap 0 -numeric -asxml -utf8 --merge-divs yes --merge-spans yes 2>/dev/null |
xmlstarlet sel -N x="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" -T -t -m "//x:table" -v '@name' -n
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this could do it:

perl -ne 'if(m/name="(.*?)"/){ print $1 . "\n"; }'
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