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I can not get this to return anything but null for ip. I must be missing something in the way that I format the operations inside the String array, please help! Also, is there a better sdk for command line work in Java? Update For future reference, this is an EC2 Instance, and doing an InetAddress.getLocalHost() returns null, so I've reverted to the command line (the AWS SDK is kind of a pain just to drill down for a localhost IP).

// Command to be run: /sbin/ifconfig | awk 'NR==2{print$2}' | sed 's/addr://g'

String[] command = new String[] {"/sbin/ifconfig", "awk 'NR==2{print$2}'", "sed 's/addr://g'" };
String ip = runCommand(command);

public static String runCommand(String[] command) {
        String ls_str;
        Process ls_proc = null;
        try {
            ls_proc = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(command);
        } catch (IOException e1) {
            e1.printStackTrace();
        }
        DataInputStream ls_in = new DataInputStream(ls_proc.getInputStream());

        try {
            while ((ls_str = ls_in.readLine()) != null) {
                    return ls_str;
            }
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return null;
    }
share|improve this question
    
Do you really have to resort to invoking a system command to get the IP addresses of your interfaces, or can you use Java libraries to do it? –  birryree Feb 22 '11 at 16:54
    
It's an EC2 instance; the NetworkInterfaces don't seem to work. –  Frank LoVecchio Feb 22 '11 at 16:57
    
@user375566 - I get output if I use code that enumerates the IP addresses in the system on my EC2 instances. –  birryree Feb 22 '11 at 17:07
    
Weird. InetAddress addr = null; try { addr = InetAddress.getLocalHost(); } catch (UnknownHostException e) { e.printStackTrace(); } String hostname = addr.getHostName(); return hostname; returns null for me –  Frank LoVecchio Feb 22 '11 at 17:08
    
^They need a better way to format code inside comments –  Frank LoVecchio Feb 22 '11 at 17:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
  1. Why do you try to use Runtime.exec() when there's a perfectly easy way to enumerate network interfaces in Java?
  2. You try to execute multiple commands, piping one commands output onto the other one. That job is usually done by the shell. By directly executing it, you don't get that feature. You can work around that fact by invoking the shell and passing the whole pipe to it as an argument to be executed.
  3. Read When Runtime.exec() won't. It summarizes all major pitfalls you can fall into when using Runtime.exec() (including the one mentioned in #2) and tells you how to avoid/solve them.
share|improve this answer
    
Wish I could give this more than one upvote. –  Paul Tomblin Feb 22 '11 at 16:57
    
1) The box is an EC2 instance; the NetworkInterfaces seems to return null. –  Frank LoVecchio Feb 22 '11 at 16:58
    
#2 and #3 are still very valid :) –  BalusC Feb 22 '11 at 16:59
    
Agreed. I've rarely have to do command line work in Java, good to know :) –  Frank LoVecchio Feb 22 '11 at 17:00

You can use java.net.NetworkInterface. Like this:

public static List<String> getIPAdresses() {
    List<String> ips = new ArrayList<String>();
    try {
        Enumeration<NetworkInterface> e = NetworkInterface.getNetworkInterfaces();

        while (e.hasMoreElements()) {
            NetworkInterface ni = e.nextElement();

            Enumeration<InetAddress> e2 = ni.getInetAddresses();

            while (e2.hasMoreElements()) {
                InetAddress ip = e2.nextElement();
                if (!ip.isLoopbackAddress())
                    ips.add(ip.getHostAddress());
            }
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return ips;
}

Joachim Sauer already posted the link to the documentation

share|improve this answer
    
I know how to do this; see the update for why I can't use this. –  Frank LoVecchio Feb 22 '11 at 17:06

The form of Runtime.exec() which takes a String[] does not execute multiple commands in a pipeline. Rather it executes a single command with additional arguments. I think the easiest way to do what you want is to exec a shell to do the pipeline:

Runtime.getRuntime().exec(new String[] { 
    "bash", "-c", "/sbin/ifconfig | awk 'NR==2{print$2}' | sed 's/addr://g'"
});
share|improve this answer

If you pass an array to exec(), it acts as if all the elements after the first are arguments to the first one. "awk" is not a valid argument to ifconfig.

share|improve this answer
    
ahh...that makes sense now. –  Frank LoVecchio Feb 22 '11 at 16:58
    StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder()

    try {
        while ((ls_str = ls_in.readLine()) != null) {
            result.append(ls_str);
        }
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

    return result.toString();
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't really matter as he's only interested in the first line anyway. –  Joachim Sauer Feb 22 '11 at 16:56

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