Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to understand CSS mechanism but tutorials so far haven't been a great source. They only scratch the surface.

I need to understand the fundamental differences between using #navlist li #current and #navlist li .current.

The names are not generic in order to be a very practical example.

What I think the different is:

#navlist li #current

if applied to an li element inside a parent element #navlist will bypass any inherited format to display #navlist li #current format.

On the other hand:

#navlist li .current

will apply its format but also inherit from other format.

In this example:

<ul id="navlist">
    <li><a href="#" class="current">Home</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Profile</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Destinations</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Discuss</a></li>
</ul>

with a CSS like this:

#navlist li a:hover
{
  color: #FFFFFF;
  background: #3364BB;
  border-color: #0F3974;
}

#navlist li .current
{
  color: #000;
  background: #FFFFFF;
  border-bottom: 1px solid #FFFFFF;
}

The tab will be white with a black font but hover will be applied.

With this other example:

<ul id="navlist">
        <li><a href="#" id="current">Home</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Profile</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Destinations</a></li>
        <li><a href="#">Discuss</a></li>
    </ul>

and CSS:

#navlist li a:hover
{
  color: #FFFFFF;
  background: #3364BB;
  border-color: #0F3974;
}

#navlist li #current
{
  color: #000;
  background: #FFFFFF;
  border-bottom: 1px solid #FFFFFF;
}

#current is applied and nothing else, leaving the tab white even if the mouse hover over it.

Is that right?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is that right?

Yup. This is because a:hover is more specific than .current, but less than #current. So your hover styles will override your class styles, but your ID styles are untouched.

a:hover is more specific than .current because it combines a type selector and a pseudo-class selector. That beats out a class selector (although :hover and .current are equally specific), because of the a.

#current is more specific than a:hover because IDs are always the most specific, even if you combine a multitude of non-IDs in the hover style rule's selector.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. Very short and clear! –  ndefontenay Feb 22 '11 at 17:18
    
@ndefontenay: I made it a little longer :) –  BoltClock Feb 22 '11 at 17:20
    
cheers to that! –  ndefontenay Feb 22 '11 at 17:39
add comment

Yes. (And seems specificity is the reason as BoltClock said)

This page will tell you how the browser read your css selector: http://www.css-101.org/descendant-selector/go_fetch_yourself.php

remember: id is unique, can be used for 1 element only; but class can be used to more than 1 element and tag

note: actually both rule select the same element and applied. If you write more in #navlist li a:hover, those non-overlapping prosperities will appear when mouse over #current (so call 'cascading')

more: Some keyword/concept you need to know: inheritance/cascading, css selector, css specificity, pseudo class

p.s. try jsbin / jsfiddle / cssdesk for your css test - learn from practice :D

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the additional information and resources to learn about css. –  ndefontenay Feb 22 '11 at 17:37
    
you are welcome :) –  vincicat Feb 22 '11 at 17:41
add comment

I think you've got some syntax errors in your question. This style:

#navlist li .current

will target a child element of your LI, like this:

<ul id="navlist">
     <li>
          <a href="#" class="current">Foo</a>
     </li>
</ul>

I'm assuming you intend to put a class or ID of "current" on the LI itself. If so, your rule should look something like:

#navlist li.current // no space in between 'li' and '.current'

Also remember that ID's are "weighted" more than Classes in CSS. So if you have two equally structured rules, but one uses and ID and the other uses a class, then the ID rule will trump the class rule. They BOTH will appy, but the ID rule will apply LAST. This is important to note if you are doing font-sizing and such, where rules are cumulative instead of just overriding each other.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.