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Perl has some special handling for the readline function (and the equivalent <> I/O operator) where it treats the expressions

while (<HANDLE>)
while (readline(HANDLE))

as equivalent to

while (defined($_ = <HANDLE>))

cf.

$ perl -MO=Deparse -e 'f($_) while <>'
f($_) while defined($_ = <ARGV>);      <--- implicitly sets $_
-e syntax OK

But this automatic assignment doesn't seem to happen if you hijack the readline function:

$ perl -MO=Deparse -e 'BEGIN {
> *CORE::GLOBAL::readline = sub { }
> }
> f($_) while <>'
sub BEGIN {
    *CORE::GLOBAL::readline = sub {
    };
}
f($_) while readline(ARGV);            <--- doesn't set $_ !
-e syntax OK

Of course, this will make the custom readline function work incorrectly for a lot of legacy code. The output if this code is "foo" with the BEGIN block and "bar" without it, but I want it to be "BAR".

use warnings;
BEGIN { *CORE::GLOBAL::readline = \&uc_readline; }
sub uc_readline {
    my $line = CORE::readline(shift || *ARGV);
    return uc $line if defined $line;
    return;
}
($_, $bar) = ("foo\n", "bar\n");
open X, '<', \$bar;
while (<X>) {
  print $_;           # want and expect to see  "BAR\n"
}

What options do I have to hijack the readline function but still get the proper treatment of the while (<...>) idiom? It's not practical to explicitly convert everything to while (defined($_=<...>)) in all the legacy code.

share|improve this question
3  
The cause here is that the code that does this transformation (Perl_newLOOPOP, opmini.c:5318) works on the optree and it's looking for an OP_READLINE -- but if CORE::GLOBAL::readline is defined when compiling there will be an OP_ENTERSUB in its place instead to call that sub, so the while-transform never happens. I'm not sure if that qualifies as a bug or not :) –  hobbs Feb 22 '11 at 18:59
    
Ugh, I was afraid it was something like that. If it's not a bug, at least it's underdocumented. –  mob Feb 22 '11 at 21:33
    
oops, looks like I waited too long to tell you that I sent it to perlbug -- because so did you. That's okay, you gave a test case :) –  hobbs Feb 23 '11 at 20:48
1  
This also affects readdir as of version 5.12. (prior versions didn't do this for you) It would also affect glob, except that if you try, you instead get a deep recursion error. –  Brad Gilbert Feb 25 '11 at 0:54

2 Answers 2

This is a fairly dirty hack using overloading to detect boolean context, but it seems to do the trick. It certainly needs more testing than I have given it before using this solution in a production environment:

use warnings;
BEGIN { *CORE::GLOBAL::readline = \&uc_readline; }
sub uc_readline {
    my $line = CORE::readline(shift || *ARGV);
    return Readline->new(uc $line) if defined $line;
    return;
}

{package Readline;
    sub new {shift; bless [@_]}
    use overload fallback => 1,
        'bool' => sub {defined($_ = $_[0][0])},  # set $_ in bool context
        '""'   => sub {$_[0][0]},
        '+0'   => sub {$_[0][0]};
}

my $bar;
($_, $bar) = ("foo\n", "bar\n");
open X, '<', \$bar;
while (<X>) {
  print $_;           # want and expect to see  "BAR\n"
}

which prints:

BAR

This will also make if (<X>) {...} set $_. I don't know if there is a way to limit the magic to only while loops.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, for one thing, you left out the defined test in boolean context. But that's easy to fix. –  cjm Feb 22 '11 at 19:39
    
@cjm => what do you mean? uc_readline already includes a defined test before the overloading ever happens –  Eric Strom Feb 22 '11 at 20:02
    
If $line contains a defined-but-false value (like '0'), you assign it to $_ and return it. This will terminate the while loop. You should return defined $_ instead of $_ in boolean context. –  cjm Feb 22 '11 at 20:40
    
Or, since you've already arranged for Readline objects to be created only with a defined value, just skip the test and always return 1. –  cjm Feb 22 '11 at 20:46
    
This doesn't localize $_, $_ is set to BAR after the while loop –  MkV Feb 23 '11 at 3:37

This code:

use warnings;
BEGIN { *CORE::GLOBAL::readline = \&uc_readline; }
sub uc_readline {
    my $line = CORE::readline(shift || *ARGV);
    return unless defined $line;
    $line = uc $line;
    $_ = $line;
    return $line;
}
($_, $bar) = ("foo\n", "bar\n");
open X, '<', \$bar;
while (<X>) {
  print $_;           # want and expect to see  "BAR\n"
}
print "$_";           # prints "BAR" instad of "foo"

does almost the right thing, but $_ is not localised, so after the loop, $_ is set to the last value read from the filehandle. Adding Scope::Upper to the mix fixes that:

use warnings;
use Scope::Upper qw/localize SCOPE/;
BEGIN { *CORE::GLOBAL::readline = \&uc_readline; }
sub uc_readline {
    my $line = CORE::readline(shift || *ARGV);
    return unless defined $line;
    $line = uc $line;
    local $_ = $line;
    # localize $_ in the scope of the while
    localize *main::_, \$line, SCOPE(1);
    return $line;
}
($_, $bar) = ("foo\n", "bar\n");
open X, '<', \$bar;
while (<X>) {
  print "$_";           # want and expect to see  "BAR\n"
}
print "$_";             # will print 'foo', not "BAR"
share|improve this answer
    
But this also sets $_ when you say while ($line=<X>). –  mob Feb 23 '11 at 19:25

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