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I'm using a boilerplate implementation of Model-View-Presenter in an ASP.NET WebForms application. My View has two events of consequence, one that signals that the user has filled out enough fields on the domain model to initiate a duplication check, and the other is a regular Save event. My pseudo code looks like this:

public class ItemNewPresenter : PresenterBase<IItemNewView>
{
public IItemService Service { get; private set; }
public IItemNewView View { get; private set; }

public ItemNewPresenter(IItemService service, IItemNewView view)
{
    Service = service;
    View = view;
    View.OnSave += DoItemSave;
    View.OnItemIsDuplicateCheck+= DoItemIsDuplicateCheck;
}


private void DoItemIsDuplicateCheck(object sender, CheckItemDuplicateEventArgs e)
{
    CheckForItemDuplication(e.Item);
}

private void CheckForItemDuplication(Item item){

if (Service.IsDuplicateItem(item))
    {
        View.RedirectWithNotification(BuildItemUrl(item), "This item already exists");
    }
}
private void DoItemSave(object sender, SaveItemEventArgs e)
{
    DoItemIsDuplicateCheck(this, e.ToItemDuplicateEventArgs());
    Service.Save(e.Item);
}

}

Here's my test for ensuring that my presenter behaves properly when OnItemIsDuplicateCheck is raised from the view:

[Test]
public void presenter_checking_for_existing_item_should_call_redirect_if_found()
{
    var service = new Mock<IItemService>();
    var view = new Mock<IItemNewView>();
    var presenter = new ItemNewPresenter (service.Object, view.Object);

    var onCheckExistingHandler = view.CreateEventHandler <CheckItemDuplicateEventArgs>();
    view.Object.OnExistingDenominatorCheck += onCheckExistingHandler;
    var eventArgs = new CheckItemDuplicateEventArgs();

    service.Setup(s => s.IsDuplicate(It.Is<CheckItemDuplicateEventArgs>(c => c.Equals(eventArgs)))).Returns(true);

    onCheckExistingHandler.Raise(eventArgs);

    view.Verify(v => v.RedirectWithNotification(It.IsAny<String>(), It.IsAny<string>()), Times.Once());
    service.Verify();
}

For consistency, I would like to have the same duplicate check fired when the View raises the OnSave event. My question is around how I am supposed to write my test when one of the methods I want to verify (CheckForItemDuplication) is declared on the class under test. The alternative to verifying the method invocation on the SUT (bad) would be to write my save test with lots of duplicated code (setup and assertion of all my mocks would be copied from the above test) and it also makes the unit test less focused.

   [Test]
    public void presenter_saving_item_should_check_for_dupe_and_save_if_not_one()    {
         //duplicate mocks/setups/asserts from duplicate check fixture
         //additional mocks/setups/asserts to test save logic
    }

I think TDD would suggest pulling this private method out into a separate class that collaborates with my Presenter and would be injected via DI. But adding another dependency to my Presenter for functionality that doesn't seem worthy of being a freestanding abstraction *and*represents an internal implementation detail of my Presenter seems...well...crazy. Am I way off base here? There must be some design pattern or refactoring I can apply that would avoid the need to turn a private method into a dependency.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

I would go with testing the class as is by adding the duplicate setup code. Once that test is passing and you are confident all test cases are covered you can then refactor your test code to remove duplication.

You can move the dependencies (service and view) to private fields, then add a method to create the SUT:

private Mock<IItemService> _service;
private Mock<IItemNewView> _view;

private PresenterBase<IItemNewView> CreateSUT()
{
    _service = new Mock<IItemService>();
    _view = new Mock<IItemNewView>();
    return new ItemNewPresenter (service.Object, view.Object);
}

(I think most people would prefer to initialize the Mock objects in the Setup method.)

Call the CreateSUT from your tests and now there is a little less duplication. Then you may want to add private method(s) for creating the event handler / raising the event as long as it is something that is being done the same or similar in more than one tests case.

Having this CreateSUT method cuts down on the amount of test code that is calling your constructor making it easier in the future if you were to add / remove / change dependencies. If you treat your test code like any other code and use the DRY principle when you see duplication it can result in more explicit, easier to read, maintainable test code. Dealing with very similar setup and test context is a common issue with unit testing and should not always change how the class being tested is/was designed.

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I think you are caught up in the never-ending dispute between TDD and information hiding, as you accept that injecting is probably the right thing to do (and it probably is), but also feel that outside interaction should not care about a seemingly insignificant injection.

Please, don't down-vote me for my smellyness for what I am about to say :-)

Now, what I have done sometimes, when confronted with this dilemma, is to extract the function, make an internal constructor with the object as argument, AND a public constructor without. The public ctor is forwarded to the internal with a new object such as:

public class ClassThatUseInjection
{
    private readonly SomeClass _injectedClass;

    public ClassThatUseInjection(): this(new SomeClass()) {}

    internal ClassThatUseInjection(SomeClass injectedClass)
    {
        _injectedClass = injectedClass;
    }
}


public class SomeClass
{
    public object SomeProperty { get; set; }
}

Thus, you can use the empty constructor from outside, and the other constructor for when you want to inject a stubbed argument for testpurposes. As long as the empty constructor only forwards the call without any logic of its own, you can still test it, like it has only one constructor.

Still a little smelly, yes, but not stinky-smelly :-) Or what do you think?

Regards, Morten

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1  
Interesting approach but I feel there must be a better way. As you indicated, the code I'm trying to test is a private implementation detail of the SUT and will never need to be injected via a consuming class. Introducing a new class to encapsulate that internal behavior just to achieve duplication free test code seems downright crazy :( –  Mitch A Feb 26 '11 at 17:22
    
I agree with Dirk--this cure is worse than the disease. The fact that you want to test a class should not negatively effect its design. –  Phil Sandler Feb 26 '11 at 17:41
    
But you could also argue that the class in fact does more than one thing: mediating: being a model AND mediator, thereby violating the Single Responsibility Policy. –  Morten Feb 27 '11 at 9:40
    
@Dirk, @Phil: I don't think that this is so bad. Separating for testing reasons doesn't mean that you always want to inject. You can create a dictionary with or without a key comparer implementation. So what? Injecting can become very complex and I would suggest to be somewhat pragmatic in this and also provide default implementation if it is about internal details. –  Stefan Steinegger Mar 1 '11 at 17:24
    
Morten, I don't quite follow the SRP violation. Aren't Presenters meant to mediate between the View and the Service layer. I'm open to the idea of introducing a new class, so I look forward to your response. –  Mitch A Mar 1 '11 at 17:58

I'll be interested if there are better answers, as I encounter this all the time.

The alternative to verifying the method invocation on the SUT (bad) would be to write my save test with lots of duplicated code (setup and assertion of all my mocks would be copied from the above test) and it also makes the unit test less focused.

I'm not sure why you feel it makes the test less focused, but in your shoes I would do exactly what it sounds like you don't want to do--have duplicated setup code to test isolated cases for the SUT. You are testing the external behavior of the SUT with the test you supplied, which seems exactly right to me.

I am personally not a fan of exposing more than is necessary from a class and/or making behavior that should be the responsibility of the SUT into a dependency just to facilitate testing. The "natural boundry" of the class's responsibility should not be violated just because you want to test it.

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It is easier to unit-test the calculation of the url than to unit-test that redirection has occured.

If i understood you corretly you want to test that the mvp-s CheckForItemDuplication() redirects to a certain url by raising the view-mock-s OnItemIsDuplicateCheck event.

private void CheckForItemDuplication(Item item)
{
    if (Service.IsDuplicateItem(item))
    {
        View.RedirectWithNotification(BuildItemUrl(item), 
                       "This item already exists");
    }
}

In my opinion you are doing to much. What if you rewrite your code as

internal protected GetErrorUrlForItem(Item item)
{
    if (Service.IsDuplicateItem(item))
    {
        return BuildItemUrl(item, 
                            "This item already exists");
    }
    return null;
}

private void CheckForItemDuplication(Item item)
{
    var result = GetErrorUrlForItem(item);
    if (result != null)
    {
        View.RedirectWithNotification(result);
    }
}

In the unittest just test the internal method GetErrorUrlForItem(). You have to use the InternalsVisibleTo attribute to allow accessing the internal method.

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