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I'm trying to check if a value from a column in an oracle (10g) query is a number in order to compare it. Something like:

select case when ( is_number(myTable.id) and (myTable.id >0) ) 
            then 'Is a number greater than 0' 
            else 'it is not a number' 
       end as valuetype  
  from table myTable

Any ideas on how to check that?

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1  

13 Answers 13

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Assuming that the ID column in myTable is not declared as a NUMBER (which seems like an odd choice and likely to be problematic), you can write a function that tries to convert the (presumably VARCHAR2) ID to a number, catches the exception, and returns a 'Y' or an 'N'. Something like

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION is_number( p_str IN VARCHAR2 )
  RETURN VARCHAR2 DETERMINISTIC PARALLEL_ENABLE
IS
  l_num NUMBER;
BEGIN
  l_num := to_number( p_str );
  RETURN 'Y';
EXCEPTION
  WHEN value_error THEN
    RETURN 'N';
END is_number;

You can then embed that call in a query, i.e.

SELECT (CASE WHEN is_number( myTable.id ) = 'Y' AND myTable.id > 0 
               THEN 'Number > 0'
             ELSE 'Something else'
         END) some_alias
  FROM myTable

Note that although PL/SQL has a boolean data type, SQL does not. So while you can declare a function that returns a boolean, you cannot use such a function in a SQL query.

share|improve this answer
    
Why not using 1 and 0 instead of 'Y' and 'N'? PL/SQL has the NUMBER data type and SQL will accept 1 and 0 in the query. –  eyetea Nov 5 '13 at 13:51
2  
@eyetea - Personal preference. You can certainly return a 0 or a 1. If the developers are all English speaking, I tend to prefer a Y and N instead because that's a bit more self-documenting. If you're dealing with more international development, a 0 and 1 makes more sense by getting language out of the mix. –  Justin Cave Nov 5 '13 at 15:56
    
I am just saying that in the case of 0 and 1, it wouldn't be necessary to write is_number( myTable.id ) = 1, but is_number( myTable.id ) would be enough! –  eyetea Nov 5 '13 at 16:22
    
@eyetea - That is not true. In PL/SQL, 0 is not implicitly false and 1 is not implicitly true. You would still need to have the = 1 part of the expression in order to produce a boolean result. –  Justin Cave Nov 5 '13 at 16:29
1  
@Reimius - It will depend on how frequently the data is actually numeric. Exceptions are generally expensive so if most of the data is non-numeric, this approach is going to be somewhat inefficient. If most of the data is numeric, on the other hand, this function is pretty efficient. This also takes care of non-integer numbers which Saish's regular expression does not and does not allow non-numbers like 1.234.567.890 like kevlened's solution. And it respects whatever your session's decimal separator is. –  Justin Cave Mar 21 at 20:35

One additional idea, mentioned here is to use a regular expression to check:

SELECT  foo 
FROM    bar
WHERE   REGEXP_LIKE (foo,'^[[:digit:]]+$');

The nice part is you do not need a separate PL/SQL function. The potentially problematic part is that a regular expression may not be the most efficient method for a large number of rows.

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Really clever solution. I didnt know about REGEXP_LIKE :). Thanks –  Fgblanch Mar 19 '12 at 18:42
    
Glad you found it helpful. I cannot take credit. The OP is linked above. But thanks. –  Saish Mar 20 '12 at 1:17
    
-1 This assumes that only a positive integer is a number. –  Jon Heller Aug 27 '13 at 23:47
2  
To include negatives use REGEXP_LIKE (foo, '^-?[[:digit]]+$') To also match floating point numbers refer to Matt Byrnes answer. –  shonky linux user Jan 20 at 1:14

This is a potential duplicate of Finding rows that don't contain numeric data in Oracle. Also see: How can I determine if a string is numeric in SQL?.

Here's a solution based on Michael Durrant's that works for integers.

SELECT foo
FROM bar
WHERE DECODE(TRIM(TRANSLATE(your_number,'0123456789',' ')), NULL, 'number','contains char') = 'number'

Adrian Carneiro posted a solution that works for decimals and others. However, as Justin Cave pointed out, this will incorrectly classify strings like '123.45.23.234' or '131+234'.

SELECT foo
FROM bar
WHERE DECODE(TRIM(TRANSLATE(your_number,'+-.0123456789',' ')), NULL, 'number','contains char') = 'number'

If you need a solution without PL/SQL or REGEXP_LIKE, this may help.

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You can use the regular expression function 'regexp_like' in ORACLE (10g)as below:

select case
       when regexp_like(myTable.id, '[[:digit:]]') then
        case
       when myTable.id > 0 then
        'Is a number greater than 0'
       else
        'Is a number less than or equal to 0'
     end else 'it is not a number' end as valuetype
from table myTable
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I'm against using when others so I would use (returning an "boolean integer" due to SQL not suppporting booleans)

create or replace function is_number(param in varchar2) return integer
 is
   ret number;
 begin
    ret := to_number(param);
    return 1; --true
 exception
    when invalid_number then return 0;
 end;

In the SQL call you would use something like

select case when ( is_number(myTable.id)=1 and (myTable.id >'0') ) 
            then 'Is a number greater than 0' 
            else 'it is not a number or is not greater than 0' 
       end as valuetype  
  from table myTable
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1  
invalid_number is the wrong exception. That is the exception for a SQL statement, but in PL/SQL the exception is value_error. –  Jon Heller Apr 24 at 17:34

Saish's answer using REGEXP_LIKE is the right idea but does not support floating numbers. This one will ...

Return values that are numeric

SELECT  foo 
FROM    bar
WHERE   REGEXP_LIKE (foo,'^-?\d+(\.\d+)?$');

Return values not numeric

SELECT  foo 
FROM    bar
WHERE   NOT REGEXP_LIKE (foo,'^-?\d+(\.\d+)?$');

You can test your regular expressions themselves till your heart is content at http://regexpal.com/ (but make sure you select the checkbox match at line breaks for this one).

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In order to include negative numbers the expression should be where REGEXP_LIKE (foo,'^-?\d+(\.\d+)?$'); –  shonky linux user Jan 20 at 1:05
    
Yea good point - I pasted in my regexp for something I was doing where I only wanted positive numbers. Will update my answer - love the name btw shonky ;-) –  Matt Byrne Jan 20 at 4:53
    
What about .1, +1, 1234f, or 1e1? Not all of those are commonly considered "numeric", but they are all valid numbers to Oracle. –  Jon Heller Jan 25 at 5:31
    
If they are "numeric to Oracle" then they would be stored numeric. Since the question is about a VARCHAR/VARCHAR2/whatever then the question is more about the system/code that generated the number and not necessarily Oracle itself (imagine a world outside Oracle). In this case you can be as pedantic as you like or try to suit the use case at hand. Comment was fair, downvote was unnecessary. –  Matt Byrne Jan 27 at 21:21
    
Need this one voted up, as this is the best answer here! –  Tomasz Apr 1 at 3:14

How is the column defined? If its a varchar field, then its not a number (or stored as one). Oracle may be able to do the conversion for you (eg, select * from someTable where charField = 0), but it will only return rows where the conversion holds true and is possible. This is also far from ideal situation performance wise.

So, if you want to do number comparisons and treat this column as a number, perhaps it should be defined as a number?

That said, here's what you might do:

create or replace function myToNumber(i_val in varchar2) return number is
 v_num number;
begin
 begin
   select to_number(i_val) into v_num from dual;
 exception
   when invalid_number then
   return null;
 end;
 return v_num;
end;

You might also include the other parameters that the regular to_number has. Use as so:

select * from someTable where myToNumber(someCharField) > 0;

It won't return any rows that Oracle sees as an invalid number.

Cheers.

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CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION is_number(N IN VARCHAR2) RETURN NUMBER IS
  BEGIN
    RETURN CASE regexp_like(N,'^[\+\-]?[0-9]*\.?[0-9]+$') WHEN TRUE THEN 1 ELSE 0 END;
END is_number;

Please note that it won't consider 45e4 as a number, But you can always change regex to accomplish the opposite.

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@JustinCave - The "when value_error" replacement for "when others" is a nice refinement to your approach above. This slight additional tweak, while conceptually the same, removes the requirement for the definition of and consequent memory allocation to your l_num variable:

function validNumber(vSomeValue IN varchar2)
     return varchar2 DETERMINISTIC PARALLEL_ENABLE
     is
begin
  return case when abs(vSomeValue) >= 0 then 'T' end;
exception
  when value_error then
    return 'F';
end;

Just a note also to anyone preferring to emulate Oracle number format logic using the "riskier" REGEXP approach, please don't forget to consider NLS_NUMERIC_CHARACTERS and NLS_TERRITORY.

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I'm glad you mentioned the purity rules in your original answer. It reminded me of problems I've seen when using these functions in parallel SQL, and helped to improve the accepted answer by adding DETERMINISTIC and PARALLEL_ENABLE. However, this version is not any "purer" than the original function. Write No Package State does not apply since there are no package variables involved. And simply being "purer" does not help, it must be declared in order to allow features like parallelism to work. –  Jon Heller Apr 26 at 20:33
    
@jonearles - justin's solution contains a variable "l_num" which I interpreted as a "package variable" however on testing I see that the assertion is not affected by the function variable. –  Pancho Apr 27 at 12:30
    
@jonearles - I have a few responses I will break into different comments 1. Justin's solution contains a variable "l_num" which I interpreted as a "package variable" however on testing I see that the assertion is not affected by the function variable - so it is indeed no purer. –  Pancho Apr 27 at 12:36
    
@jonearles regarding your DETERMINISTIC observation: there is a difference between fulfillment and implementation. Implementation is optional per use case but as it is impossible without fulfillment, the fulfillment to which I am referring is critical. Also, my function is in a package body and the assertion is done in the specification via the RESTRICT_REFERENCES pragma. –  Pancho Apr 27 at 12:43
    
@jonearles - even though my function is indeed no purer, it is still my preferred choice as there is no requirement for definition of, and specific memory allocation to, the essentially irrelevant l_num variable contained in Justin's solution. –  Pancho Apr 27 at 12:47

well, you could create the is_number function to call so your code works.

create or replace function is_number(param varchar2) return boolean
 as
   ret number;
 begin
    ret := to_number(param);
    return true;
 exception
    when others then return false;
 end;

EDIT: Please defer to Justin's answer. Forgot that little detail for a pure SQL call....

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2  
A function returning a boolean would work well if you only need to do the check in PL/SQL. But a function returning a boolean cannot (regrettably) be called from a SQL query because the SQL engine does not have a boolean data type. –  Justin Cave Feb 22 '11 at 18:31
    
Yep, thats what I get for diving in without testing! ;) –  Michael Broughton Feb 22 '11 at 18:34

Function for mobile number of length 10 digits and starting from 9,8,7 using regexp

create or replace FUNCTION VALIDATE_MOBILE_NUMBER
(   
   "MOBILE_NUMBER" IN varchar2
)
RETURN varchar2
IS
  v_result varchar2(10);

BEGIN
    CASE
    WHEN length(MOBILE_NUMBER) = 10 
    AND MOBILE_NUMBER IS NOT NULL
    AND REGEXP_LIKE(MOBILE_NUMBER, '^[0-9]+$')
    AND MOBILE_NUMBER Like '9%' OR MOBILE_NUMBER Like '8%' OR MOBILE_NUMBER Like '7%'
    then 
    v_result := 'valid';
    RETURN v_result;
      else 
      v_result := 'invalid';
       RETURN v_result;
       end case;
    END;
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I believe the following solution (based on the regexp_like approach above) is optimal:

function isInteger(vYourValue IN varchar2)
         return varchar2
         is
begin
  return case REGEXP_INSTR(vYourValue,'^[[:digit:]]+$') when 0 then 'F' else 'T' end;
end;

Why do I say this?

  1. The numeric subset tested can be amended as desired by changing the regexp appropriately.

  2. It can be used in SQL ie select isInteger(myCol) from mytable; as it returns 'T' of 'F' instead of boolean.

  3. It can be used natively in pl/sql ie. if isInteger(vMyValue) = 'T' then ....

  4. It satisfies a WNDS,WNPS purity assertion.

  5. It does not rely on the, in my opinion, too broad spectrum "when others" approach for result determination.

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1  
What about negative numbers, or decimals, or E? Regular expressions are not a good way to solve this problem. Parsing numbers is not as simple as everything thinks. –  Jon Heller Apr 24 at 5:09
    
@jonearles - I think your markdown is a bit strong. For an easy "perfect" solution I suggest you ask Oracle to provide an is_number function returning 0 or 1, or worst case throwing a targeted error such as "invalid_number" that can be reliably identified. (I am in fact astounded that they haven't provided this already). From where I stand however, the method I have described remains the best on offer for the above reasons. While I agree that exhaustive number parsing is challenging, regexps are extremely powerful - and it is telling that you choose "not simple" rather than "impossible". –  Pancho Apr 24 at 8:40
    
On reflection I agree with @jonearles that while playable for clearly defined number subsets regexp is NOT ideal for general purpose number validation. While I'm reasonably confident that a regexp could be created to satisfy every variation of number Oracle can produce, it would take a fair amount of thought, and any deviation from to_number() logic could lead to problems. For example to_number(' 2 ') is a number - note blank spaces - and when introducing NLS values into the mix ...well it all looks like a bit of a headache. –  Pancho Apr 24 at 21:25

Note that regexp or function approaches are several times slower than plain sql condition.

So some heuristic workarounds with limited applicability make sence for huge scans.

There is a solution for cases when you know for sure that non-numeric values would contain some alphabetic letters:

select case when upper(dummy)=lower(dummy) then '~numeric' else '~alpabetic' end from dual

And if you know some letter would be always present in non-numeric cases:

select case when instr(dummy, 'X')>0 then '~alpabetic' else '~numeric' end from dual

When numeric cases would always contain zero:

select case when instr(dummy, '0')=0 then '~alpabetic' else '~numeric' end from dual
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