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So I'm teaching myself algorithms from this book I purchased, and I have a pseudo-code for Finding the distance between the two closetst elements in an array of numbers

MinDistance(a[0...n-1])
Input: Array A of numbers
Output: Minimum Distance between two of its elements
dMin <- maximum integer

for i=0 to n-1 do
   for j=0 to n-1 do
      if i!=j and | A[i] - A[j] | < dMin
        dMin = | A[i]-A[j] |
return dMin

However, I wanted to make improvements to this algorithmic solution. Change what's already there, or rewrite all together. Can someone help? I wrote the function and class in Java to test the pseudo-code? Is that correct? And once again, how can I make it better from efficiency standpoint.

//Scanner library allowing the user to input data
import java.lang.Math.*;

public class ArrayTester{
    //algorithm for finding the distance between the two closest elements in an array of numbers
    public int MinDistance(int [] ar){
    int [] a = ar;
    int aSize = a.length;
    int dMin = 0;//MaxInt
    for(int i=0; i< aSize; i++)
    {
        for(int j=i+1; j< aSize;j++)
        {   
            dMin = Math.min(dMin, Math.abs( a[i]-a[j] );
        }
    }
    return dMin;
}

    //MAIN
    public static void main(String[] args){

        ArrayTester at = new ArrayTester();
        int [] someArray = {9,1,2,3,16};
        System.out.println("NOT-OPTIMIZED METHOD");
        System.out.println("Array length = "+ someArray.length);
        System.out.println("The distance between the two closest elements: " + at.MinDistance(someArray));

    } //end MAIN

} //END CLASS

SO I updated the function to minimize calling the Math.abs twice. What else can I do improve it. If I was to rewrite it with sort, would it change my for loops at all, or would it be the same just theoretically run faster.

public int MinDistance(int [] ar){
        int [] a = ar;
        int aSize = a.length;
        int dMin = 0;//MaxInt
        for(int i=0; i< aSize; i++)
        {
            for(int j=i+1; j< aSize;j++)
            {   
                dMin = Math.min(dMin, Math.abs( a[i]-a[j] );
            }
        }
        return dMin;
    }
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5 Answers

One obvious efficiency improvement: sort the integers first, then you can look at adjacent ones. Any number is going to be closest to its neighbour either up or down.

That changes the complexity from O(n2) to O(n log n). Admittedly for the small value of n shown it's not going to make a significant difference, but in terms of theoretical complexity it's important.

One micro-optimization you may want to make: use a local variable to store the result of Math.abs, then you won't need to recompute it if that turns out to be less than the minimum. Alternatively, you might want to use dMin = Math.min(dMin, Math.abs((a[i] - a[j])).

Note that you need to be careful of border conditions - if you're permitting negative numbers, your subtraction might overflow.

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3  
Since he's sorting integers, he can further use an O(n) sorting algorithm like Radix Sort. –  stackoverflowuser2010 Feb 22 '11 at 19:25
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Element_distinctness_problem –  Aryabhatta Feb 22 '11 at 19:27
    
how can you find the distance between closest elements in array when you sort the array? If we are sorting ,all we can find is which two elements are closest to each other . –  Barry Dec 14 '11 at 3:44
2  
@Barry: Well the closest neighbour to item index i is either going to be at index i + 1 or index i - 1 - so you can find that closest distance easily. Then just iterate over the array to find the smallest "closest distance" if you see what I mean. –  Jon Skeet Dec 14 '11 at 5:14
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First of all, before making it fast, make it correct. Why is dmin initialized with the length of the array? If the array is [1, 1000], the result of your algorithm will be 2 instead of 999.

Then, why do you make j go from 0 to the length of the array? You compare each pair of elements twice. You should make j go from i + 1 to the length of the array (which will also avoid the i != j comparison).

Finally, you could gain a few nanoseconds by avoiding calling Math.abs() twice.

And then, you could completely change your algorithm by sorting the array first, as noted in other answers.

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Here's a question:

How long would it take to find the min distance if the array was sorted?

You should be able to finish the rest out from here.

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That's a naive solution of O(n^2).

Better way:

Sort the array, then go over it once more and check the distance between the sorted items.
This will work because they are in ascending order, so the number with the nearest value is adjacent.

That solution will be O(nlogn)

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sort it with the library sort? –  user628796 Feb 22 '11 at 20:41
1  
The library sort is probably well implemented –  Yochai Timmer Feb 22 '11 at 20:51
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You can theoretically get an O(n) solution by

  1. sorting with shell radix sort (edited, thanks to j_random_hacker for pointing it out)
  2. one pass to find difference between numbers
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Shell sort is not O(n). According to Wikipedia, the best bound varies according to the gap sequence chosen, but is always worse than O(nlog n). Maybe you're thinking of bucket sort? –  j_random_hacker Feb 23 '11 at 9:20
    
@j_random_hacker, +1 for pointing out. Fixed my answer. user628796 can use radix sort, as the problem space is all numbers. –  CMR Feb 23 '11 at 12:09
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