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Is there a "straightforward" way to convert a str containing numbers into a list of [x,y] ints?

# from: '5,4,2,4,1,0,3,0,5,1,3,3,14,32,3,5'
# to: [[5, 4], [2, 4], [1, 0], [3, 0], [5, 1], [3, 3], [14, 32], [3, 5]]

By the way, the following works, but wouldn't call it straightforward... Also, it can be assumed that the input str has been validated to make sure that it only contains an even number of numbers interleaved by commas.

num_str = '5,4,2,4,1,0,3,0,5,1,3,3,14,32,3,5'
numpairs_lst = []      # ends up as [[5, 4], [2, 4], [1, 0], ...]

current_num_str = ''   # the current num within the str; stop when a comma is found
xy_pair = []           # this is one of the [x,y] pairs -> [5, 4] 
for ix,c in enumerate(num_str):
    if c == ',':
        xy_pair.append(int(current_num_str))
        current_num_str = ''
        if len(xy_pair) == 2:
            numpairs_lst.append(xy_pair)
            xy_pair = []
    else:
        current_num_str += c

# and, take care of last number...
xy_pair.append(int(current_num_str))
numpairs_lst.append(xy_pair)
share|improve this question
    
duplicated: stackoverflow.com/questions/4501636/creating-sublists –  tokland Feb 22 '11 at 20:12
1  
[[x,y] for x,y in zip(num_str.split(',')[::2],num_str.split(',')[1::2])] –  dawg Feb 22 '11 at 21:02

11 Answers 11

up vote 23 down vote accepted

There are two important one line idioms in Python that help make this "straightforward".

The first idiom, use zip(). From the Python documents:

The left-to-right evaluation order of the iterables is guaranteed. This makes possible an idiom for clustering a data series into n-length groups using zip(*[iter(s)]*n).

So applying to your example:

>>> num_str = '5,4,2,4,1,0,3,0,5,1,3,3,14,32,3,5'
>>> zip(*[iter(num_str.split(","))]*2)
[('5', '4'), ('2', '4'), ('1', '0'), ('3', '0'), ('5', '1'), 
('3', '3'), ('14', '32'), ('3', '5')]

That produces tuples each of length 2.

If you want the length of the sub elements to be different:

>>> zip(*[iter(num_str.split(","))]*4)
[('5', '4', '2', '4'), ('1', '0', '3', '0'), ('5', '1', '3', '3'), 
('14', '32', '3', '5')]

The second idiom is list comprehensions. If you want sub elements to be lists, wrap in a comprehension:

>>> [list(t) for t in zip(*[iter(num_str.split(","))]*4)]
[['5', '4', '2', '4'], ['1', '0', '3', '0'], ['5', '1', '3', '3'], 
['14', '32', '3', '5']]
>>> [list(t) for t in zip(*[iter(num_str.split(","))]*2)]
[['5', '4'], ['2', '4'], ['1', '0'], ['3', '0'], ['5', '1'], ['3', '3'], 
['14', '32'], ['3', '5']]

Any sub element groups that are not complete will be truncated by zip(). So if your string is not a multiple of 2, for example, you will loose the last element.

If you want to return sub elements that are not complete (ie, if your num_str is not a multiple of the sub element's length) use a slice idiom:

>>> l=num_str.split(',')
>>> [l[i:i+2] for i in range(0,len(l),2)]
[['5', '4'], ['2', '4'], ['1', '0'], ['3', '0'], ['5', '1'], 
['3', '3'], ['14', '32'], ['3', '5']]
>>> [l[i:i+7] for i in range(0,len(l),7)]
[['5', '4', '2', '4', '1', '0', '3'], ['0', '5', '1', '3', '3', '14', '32'], 
['3', '5']]

If you want each element to be an int, you can apply that prior to the other transforms discussed here:

>>> nums=[int(x) for x in num_str.split(",")]
>>> zip(*[iter(nums)]*2)
# etc etc etc

As pointed out in the comments, with Python 2.4+, you can also replace the list comprehension with a Generator Expression by replacing the [ ] with ( ) as in:

 >>> nums=(int(x) for x in num_str.split(","))
 >>> zip(nums,nums)
 [(5, 4), (2, 4), (1, 0), (3, 0), (5, 1), (3, 3), (14, 32), (3, 5)]
 # or map(list,zip(nums,nums)) for the list of lists version...

If your string is long, and you know that you only need 2 elements, this is more efficient.

share|improve this answer
    
Your first solution is most Pythonic, I think. (except you left out map(int) to convert strings to ints as OP requested) –  Paul McGuire Feb 22 '11 at 22:13
    
To get tuples of numbers instead of strings, you can use zip(*[imap(int, num_str.split(","))]*2) (using itertools.imap()). –  Sven Marnach Feb 22 '11 at 22:18
1  
The problem with the generator in this case is that a generator does not have length and is not sub-scriptable; therefor, you cannot use the "slice idiom" that supports partial sub lists. Given that the string is already in memory and the resulting list will be in memory, the generator is more theoretical than practical IMHO. +1 tho, your Python is improving dude! –  the wolf Feb 23 '11 at 3:29
2  
@Johnsyweb: I actually think that list comprehensions and genexp are one of the truly beautiful features of Python -- I love them! Perl has similar constructs; more flexible if you understand them; far less readable than the Python equivalent. The thing that is hard for me to get (subjective interpretation of the Zen and a Perl background) is the bias in Python for small helper functions. Rather than everything in 1 line, one must trace through the little functions. Trade-off I guess. Thanks for the comment tho. I learn more every day thanks to helpful comments. :-} –  dawg Feb 23 '11 at 20:29
2  
@drewk: I completely agree. The good things about small helper functions are that they're very easy to unit-test and (with meaningful names) they make it easy to read what you are doing (not how you are doing it). Hence if you search the www for "executable pseudocode", you get lots of hits about Python! –  Johnsyweb Feb 23 '11 at 21:11

One option:

>>> num_str = '5,4,2,4,1,0,3,0,5,1,3,3,4,3,3,5'
>>> l = num_str.split(',')
>>> zip(l[::2], l[1::2])
[('5', '4'), ('2', '4'), ('1', '0'), ('3', '0'), ('5', '1'), ('3', '3'), ('4', '3'), ('3', '5')]

Reference: str.split(), zip(), General information about sequence types and slicing

If you actually want integers, you could convert the list to integers first using map:

>>> l = map(int, num_str.split(','))

Explanation:

split creates a list of the single elements. The trick is the slicing: the syntax is list[start:end:step]. l[::2] will return every second element starting from the first one (so the first, third,...), whereas the second slice l[1::2] returns every second element from the second one (so the second, forth, ...).

Update: If you really want lists, you could use map again on the result list:

>>> xy_list = map(list, xy_list)

Note that @Johnsyweb's answer is probably faster as it seems to not do any unnecessary iterations. But the actual difference depends of course on the size of the list.

share|improve this answer
    
You beat me to it. –  Wilduck Feb 22 '11 at 20:02
    
That zip part is great. –  Brendan Long Feb 22 '11 at 20:03
    
How does this work? –  user225312 Feb 22 '11 at 20:04
    
@A A: What exactly do you want to know? –  Felix Kling Feb 22 '11 at 20:07
    
@Felix: The slicing part. –  user225312 Feb 22 '11 at 20:07

You can shorten the first part (converting "1,2,3" to [1, 2, 3]) by using the split function:

num_list = num_str.split(",")

There might be an easier way to get pairs, but I'd do something like this:

xy_pairs = []
for i in range(0, len(num_list), 2):
    x = num_list[i]
    y = num_list[i + 1]
    xy_pairs.append([x, y])

Also, since these are all lists of a defined length (2), you should probably use a tuple:

xy_pairs.append((x, y))
share|improve this answer

Maybe this?

a = "0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9".split(",")
[[int(a.pop(0)), int(a.pop(0))] for x in range(len(a)/2)]
share|improve this answer
1  
-1 Of all the answers, This is the WORST. –  John Machin Feb 22 '11 at 21:18
    
john, i just saw your answer and seems quite good as well. why do you say that guillermo's answer is bad? to me it seems concise and yet clear. –  jd. Feb 22 '11 at 21:56
3  
@jd: a.pop(0) is least efficient (N**2 behaviour) and most obscure. –  John Machin Feb 22 '11 at 22:09
    
range(len(a)/2) Will create a big list of numbers over which to iterate and then discard (in Python < 3). –  Johnsyweb Feb 22 '11 at 22:26
    
is it really n**2; seems more like O(n); however, agree that it's not the most efficient - no need to create a range and neither to discard elements. drewk's answer illustrates several good features. –  jd. Feb 22 '11 at 22:39

First, use split to make a list of numbers (as in all of the other answers).

num_list = num_str.split(",")

Then, convert to integers:

num_list = [int(i) for i in num_list]

Then, use the itertools groupby recipe:

from itertools import izip_longest
def grouper(n, iterable, fillvalue=None):
   "grouper(3, 'ABCDEFG', 'x') --> ABC DEF Gxx"
   args = [iter(iterable)] * n
   return izip_longest(fillvalue=fillvalue, *args)

pair_list = grouper(2, num_list)

Of course, you can compress this into a single line if you're frugal:

pair_list = grouper(2, [int(i) for i in num_str.split(",")]
share|improve this answer
#!/usr/bin/env python

from itertools import izip

def pairwise(iterable):
    "s -> (s0,s1), (s2,s3), (s4, s5), ..."
    a = iter(iterable)
    return izip(a, a)

s = '5,4,2,4,1,0,3,0,5,1,3,3,4,3,3,5'
fields = s.split(',')
print [[int(x), int(y)] for x,y in pairwise(fields)]

Taken from @martineau's answer to my question, which I have found to be very fast.

Output:

[[5, 4], [2, 4], [1, 0], [3, 0], [5, 1], [3, 3], [4, 3], [3, 5]]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Seems to be a very efficient solution. –  Felix Kling Feb 22 '11 at 20:23
>>> num_str = '5,4,2,4,1,0,3,0,5,1,3,3,4,3,3,5'
>>> inums = iter([int(x) for x in num_str.split(',')])
>>> [[x, inums.next()] for x in inums]
[[5, 4], [2, 4], [1, 0], [3, 0], [5, 1], [3, 3], [4, 3], [3, 5]]
>>>
share|improve this answer
    
1. You can omit the iter and the suqare brackets in the second line, and it will still work. 2. next(inums) is preferrable over inums.next(), since this would make the solution work in Python 3.x as well. 3. If you are fine with tuples instead of lists, the last line can be written zip(inums, inums). –  Sven Marnach Feb 22 '11 at 22:09
    
@Sven Marnach: (1) & (2): You are correct, for recent Pythons; my code is often conditioned by supporting a package on 2.1 through 2.7 :-) (3) I'm fine with tuples, but the OP wanted lists. –  John Machin Feb 22 '11 at 22:14
    
I also experienced that supporting Python 2.1 seems more important in practice than supporting 3.x :) –  Sven Marnach Feb 22 '11 at 22:22

EDIT: @drewk cleaned this up to handle even or odd length lists:

>>> f = '5,4,2,4,1,0,3,0,5,1,3,3,14,32,3,5'
>>> li = [int(n) for n in f.split(',')]
>>> [li[i:i+2] for i in range(0, len(li), 2)]
[[5, 4], [2, 4], [1, 0], [3, 0], [5, 1], [3, 3], [14, 32], [3, 5], [7]]
share|improve this answer
    
[li[i:i+n] for i in range(0,len(li),n)] works for even or odd... –  dawg Feb 22 '11 at 22:14

It may be interesting to have a generator. Here's a generator expression:

import re
ch = '5,4,2,4,1,0,3,0,5,1,3,3,14,32,3,5'
genexp = ( map(int,ma.groups()) for ma in re.finditer('(\d+)\s*,\s*(\d+)',ch) )
share|improve this answer
#declare the string of numbers
str_nums = '5,4,2,4,1,0,3,0,5,1,3,3,14,32,3,5'

#zip two lists: the even elements with the odd elements, casting the strings to integers
zip([int(str_nums.split(',')[i]) for i in range(0,len(str_nums.split(',')),2)],[int(str_nums.split(',')[i]) for i in range(1,len(str_nums.split(',')),2)])

"""
Of course you would want to clean this up with some intermediate variables, but one liners like this is why I love Python :)
"""
share|improve this answer

This is a more generalized function which works for different chunk sizes and appends the reminder if needed

def breakup(mylist,chunks):
  mod = len(mylist) % chunks
  if mod ==  0:
      ae = []
  elif mod == 1:
      ae = mylist[-1:]
  else:
      ae = [tuple(mylist[-mod:])]
  return zip(*[iter(mylist)]*chunks) + ae

num_str = '5,4,2,4,1,0,3,0,5,1,3,3,14,32,3,5'
lst = map(int,num_str.split(','))
print breakup(lst,2)

OUT: [(5, 4), (2, 4), (1, 0), (3, 0), (5, 1), (3, 3), (14, 32), (3, 5)]

share|improve this answer

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