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public string toJSON(SqlDataReader o)
{
    StringBuilder s = new StringBuilder();
    s.Append("[");
    if (o.HasRows)
        while (o.Read())
            s.Append("{" + '"' + "Id" + '"' + ":" + o["Id"] + ", "
            + '"' + "CN" + '"' + ":" + o["CatName"] + ", "
            + '"' + "Ord" + '"' + ":" + o["Ord"] + ","
            + '"' + "Icon" + '"' + ":" + o["Icon"] + "}, ");
    s.Remove(s.Length - 2, 2);
    s.Append("]");
    o.Close();
    return s.ToString();
}

I'm using here my own function to do serialization . I need to know if this is a good way or I should use another . BTW I've tried to use the JavaScriptSerializer but this didn't work with SqlDataReader . thanx

share|improve this question
2  
Learn to use string.Format and make your life easier. –  Oded Feb 22 '11 at 20:44
    
Yea, I know how :P –  Rawhi Feb 22 '11 at 20:45
1  
And what about StringBuilder.AppendFormat? And using verbatim string literals (those that you start with a @)? –  Oded Feb 22 '11 at 20:46
    
This could help in some way . thnx but do u think this function is good or what ! –  Rawhi Feb 22 '11 at 20:49

4 Answers 4

If you want something that'll convert to arbitrary JSON, you could convert by serializing it into a Dictionary(Of string, object) thusly:

public IEnumerable<Dictionary<string, object>> Serialize(SqlDataReader reader)
{
    var results = new List<Dictionary<string, object>>();
    var cols = new List<string>();
    for (var i = 0; i < reader.FieldCount; i++) 
        cols.Add(reader.GetName(i));

    while (reader.Read()) 
        results.Add(SerializeRow(cols, reader));

    return results;
}
private Dictionary<string, object> SerializeRow(IEnumerable<string> cols, 
                                                SqlDataReader reader) {
    var result = new Dictionary<string, object>();
    foreach (var col in cols) 
        result.Add(col, reader[col]);
    return result;
}

And then use the NewtonSoft.Json JsonConvert object to get your JSON:

var r = Serialize(reader);
string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(r, Formatting.Indented);

UPDATE: If you just want to use built-in methods, and you happen to be using MVC, you can use the built in Json helper method on your newly serialized :

JsonResult Index(int id) {
    var r = Serialize(reader);
    return Json(r, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This is the best solution for replacing old WebForms code that uses SqlDataSource and AutoGenerateColumns="True", which is what I need it for! You saved me 5 minutes of coding. Love the Internet. –  John Zabroski Apr 28 '13 at 13:33
    
Glad you found it useful. That's what I used it for, too. :) –  Jonathan Apr 29 '13 at 11:51

Another option would be to use Jason Newton-King's excellent JSON.NET library - http://james.newtonking.com/projects/json-net.aspx

Here's a quick example on how to use it to build up a collection and then output it as a JSON-serialized string:

using Newtonsoft.Json;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ArrayList objs = new ArrayList();

        //get the data reader, etc.
        while(o.Read())
        {
            objs.Add(new
            {
                Id = o["Id"],
                CN = o["CatName"],
                Ord = o["Ord"],
                Icon = o["Icon"]
            });
        }

        //clean up datareader

        Console.WriteLine(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(objs));
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

You could do the same with your looping by reading in each row of your SqlDataReader into an anonymous object and then use JSON.NET to serialize it to a string.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

Try this:

var dataQuery = from d in o.Cast<DbDataRecord>()
                select new
                {
                    Id = (String)d["Id"],
                    CN = (String)d["CatName"],
                    Ord = (String)d["Ord"],
                    Icon = (String)d["Icon"]
                };
var data = data.ToArray();
JavaScriptSerializer serializer = new JavaScriptSerializer();
String jsonData = serializer.Serialize(data);
share|improve this answer
1  
I must have missed the MVC tag on the question. Oh, wait a sec, I didn't, since it isn't there... –  Oded Feb 22 '11 at 20:50
    
Yes using LINQ but this is also slower than this function . right !! –  Rawhi Feb 22 '11 at 20:50
    
@Oded: Was deeply obsessed with MVC lately :). Changed the post to remove and MVC falvor in the answer if tht makes u happy –  Chandu Feb 22 '11 at 20:53
    
@Cybernate - I just wasn't sure that return Json(...) would have even compiled for the OP ;) –  Oded Feb 22 '11 at 20:55
    
@Oded: Thanks for your observation though.. maybe the user is not using it in MVC context. –  Chandu Feb 22 '11 at 20:57

I made the following method where it converts any DataReader to JSON, but only for single depth serialization:

you should pass the reader, and the column names as a string array, for example:

String [] columns = {"CustomerID", "CustomerName", "CustomerDOB"};

then call the method

public static String json_encode(IDataReader reader, String[] columns)
    {
        int length = columns.Length;

        String res = "{";

        while (reader.Read())
        {
            res += "{";

            for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
            {
                res += "\"" + columns[i] + "\":\"" + reader[columns[i]].ToString() + "\"";

                if (i < length - 1)
                    res += ",";
            }

            res += "}";
        }

        res += "}";

        return res;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
In c# strings are immutable, so your loop based concatenation could potentially require a lot of memory allocation. I recommend implementing a string builder if you're going to stick with the approach you have outlined. Having said that, I personally wouldn't try to write a JSON encoder like this. For example, what happens to the validity of your output if the content of a column name or a reader column value contains a quote, comma, or a bracket? –  Bennett Dill Oct 14 '13 at 18:47

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