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How does a javascript library, such as Prototype, decide when to write a function that accepts a series of arguments or just accept one giant object? Below are examples of the two. The pros and cons of each are well balanced, so I don't understand when to use one method or the other.

Object

new Ajax.Request(
 'server.php', {
  onSuccess: function() {
   console.info('I succeeded');
  },
  onFailure: function() {
   console.info('I failed');
  }
);

Pros: Order of the arguments in the object is irrelevant. You don't have to check the function defintion when you've forgotten the order of the arguments. Also, when other people read the calls to that function, they have a better sense of what you're doing. Imagine if the Ajax call were like this:

new Ajax.Request(
 'server.php', 
  function() {
   console.info('mystery function');
  },
  function() {
   console.info('is this success or failure?');
  }
);

Cons: The function header does not clearly show what needs to be passed in. You are forced to keep your comments up to date.

// unclear what options need to be passed in without comments
Ajax = {
 Request: function(url, options) {
 }
};

// a little clearer
Ajax = {
 Request: function(url, successCallback, failureCallback) {
 }
};

Normal

new PeriodicalExecuter(
 function(myself) {
  console.info('I am running');
 },
 1
);

Pros: The function definition does not require comments for people to quickly grasp what the parameters are.

Cons: Order of the arguments matter. It's harder to specify default values:

// dirty
PeriodicalExecuter = function(callback, period) {
 if (typeof(callback) === 'undefined') {
  callback = Prototype.emptyFunction;
 }
 if (typeof(period) === 'undefined') {
  period = 1;
 } 
};

// clean 
PeriodicalExecuter = function(options) {
 var myOptions = {callback: Prototype.emptyFunction, period: 1};
 Object.extend(myOptions, options);
};
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I'm not clear on the question being asked exactly... –  Stephen Feb 22 '11 at 20:50
1  
Well.. I understood your Object example on the first read, but it took me four reads to wrap my head around your PeriodicalExecuter example. So I guess I'd go with the first approach in most cases. –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 22 '11 at 20:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I tend to find objects easier when there are a number of "optional" parameters. i.e. if you only want to override, say, 2 out of the plethora of options available to override, an object is best, IMHO. (jQuery's .ajax function is a prime example of this). If you're only dealing with 1-3 options, parameters seem to make sense as it's explicit which parameters do what. (for example, the replace function built in to JavaScript)

There's nothing more annoying than trying to parse out an argument list testing for which parameter matches which functionality (oops, parameter 3 is a function, they must mean this is the callback parameter, not the default color parameter, e.g.)

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