Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am wondering how I would loop through a datetime or any type of variable to go from 12:00AM to 11:59PM every 30 Mins?

So I need a variable that shows times in 12HR format (01:00PM, 09:00AM) and everytime I loop through it, to add 30 mins to the time? I then need to use this value in a string.

The time needs to start at 10:00AM

share|improve this question
    
Why loop? From your description, it would be easy to determine what the string should be at any time of the day? –  Paddy Feb 22 '11 at 21:46
    
@Paddy - I think the OP want's to loop through every value from 10:00AM - 9:59AM incrementing by 30 minutes. Though, admittedly, I'm not really sure. The question is not very clear. –  Richard Marskell - Drackir Feb 22 '11 at 21:49

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

And there is always LINQ

var start = DateTime.Today;
var clockQuery = from offset in Enumerable.Range(0, 48)
                 select start.AddMinutes(30 * offset);
foreach (var time in clockQuery)
    Console.WriteLine(time.ToString("hh:mm tt"));

... LINQ + FUNC (for parameterized start)

Func<DateTime, IEnumerable<DateTime>> clockQuery = start =>
    from offset in Enumerable.Range(0, 48)
    select start.AddMinutes(30 * offset);
foreach (var time in clockQuery(DateTime.Today))
    Console.WriteLine(time.ToString("hh:mm tt"));

... or if you just want the TimeSpan offsets ...

var start = DateTime.Today;
var clockQuery = from offset in Enumerable.Range(0, 48)
                 select TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30 * offset);
foreach (var time in clockQuery)
    Console.WriteLine((start + time).ToString("hh:mm tt"));
share|improve this answer
    
IS there a way to say what time i want to start with in the foreach? –  user380432 Feb 22 '11 at 22:32
    
I think it should be Enumerable.Range(0, 47) as the 0..48 would give you 49 times which runs into the next day with 24.5 hours. –  Grant unwin Feb 5 at 0:20

You could use an extension method:

public static class DateTimeHelper
{
    public static IEnumerable<DateTime> GetHalfHours(this DateTime dt)
    {
        TimeSpan ts = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(30);
        DateTime time = dt;
        while(true)
        {
            yield return time;
            time.Add(ts);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for implementing as IEnumerable. Isn't that while(true) gonna make it enum forever though? –  Radu094 Feb 22 '11 at 21:52
1  
yes, it's an infinite sequence- certainly can't do a .ToList() on this one but you could do dt.GetHalfHours().Take(5) i.e. to get the next 5 "half hours" - all works because Linq is lazy –  BrokenGlass Feb 22 '11 at 21:54
    
Clever use of linq :) –  JonWillis Feb 22 '11 at 21:58

DateTime can do simple arithmetic:

DateTime time = DateTime.Now;
time = time + TimeSpan.FromMinutes(1);

Causes time to be incremented by one minute.

You can use a Timer class and increase the DateTime by whatever amount of time is appropriate once per tick. If exactness is important here there are other, more appropriate timer classes.

There are other static methods on the TimeSpan class as well!

share|improve this answer

something like this?

DateTime timeloop = new DateTime(0);
timeloop = timeloop.Add(new TimeSpan(10, 00, 0)); //start at 10:00 AM

            for (int i = 0; i < 48; i++)
            {
                string time =timeloop.ToString("hh:mm tt");           //print it as 1:30 PM
                timeloop = timeloop.Add(new TimeSpan(0, 30, 0));      //add 30 minutes
                               }
share|improve this answer
    
This worked perfectly for what I was trying to do, thanks. –  bigcakes May 6 '13 at 19:04
        DateTime time = new DateTime(2011,02,22,10,0,0);
        List<String> times = new List<string>();

        for (int i = 0; i < 48; i++)
        {
            time = time.AddMinutes(30);
            times.Add(time.ToString());
        }

This might do what you need

share|improve this answer

Something like this should work for you:

    int workCount = 0;
    var timer = new System.Timers.Timer(1800000);   // every half hour
    timer.AutoReset = true;

    timer.Elapsed += (src, e) =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now.ToString("HH:mm:ss"));

        if(++workCount == 48)
        {
            timer.Stop();
        }
    };

    timer.Start();
share|improve this answer
var times = new List<string>();
DateTime today = DateTime.Today;
DateTime tomorrow = today.AddDays(1);
for (var i = today; i < tomorrow; i = i.AddMinutes(30))
{
    times.Add(i.ToShortTimeString());
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.