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I am trying to create some HTML/CSS for footer navigation.

What I would like to have is main sections as separate ul's and then each sub-section as an li within.

The ul would have a fixed height, with the li's flowing down within. If they run out of room to go down, I'd like them to then start again on the right hand side.

I though this would be quite simple, and tried it with the following HTML/CSS

<ul class="my_ul">
<li class="bold"> Home </li>
</ul>
<ul class="my_ul">
<li class="bold"> Catalogue </li>
<li> Category 1 </li>
<li> Category 2 </li>
<li> Category 3 </li>
<li> Category 4 </li>
<li> Category 5 </li>
</ul>
<ul class="my_ul">
<li class="bold"> Company </li>
<li> Company 1 </li>
<li> Company 2 </li>
<li> Company 3 </li>
<li> Company 4 </li>
<li> Company 5 </li>
</ul>


.my_ul {
height: 130px;
float: left;
}
.my_ul li {
float: left;
clear: left;
list-style: none;
}

The above works, except that when it gets to the bottom of the ul it keeps going. Obviously overflow:hidden makes it disapear, but this isn't what I want. I want it to start a new column to the right.

Any ideas how I can improve this?

Thanks,

Matt

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you're looking to do, you can't do with pure CSS, unfortunately. You can with a combination of javascript and CSS.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. I thought this was probably the case, but was hoping for a pure CSS solution. I'll probably do it with some PHP to work out how many have been added, giving them a fixed height. The whole point of the text navigation is to accommodate those with lesser browsers lacking stuff like javascript. –  Matt McDonald Feb 22 '11 at 22:03
    
Ah - yeah, PHP should be a homerun for that. Cheers –  TNC Feb 22 '11 at 22:06

For columns you can use CSS3, though it won't work in older browsers nor IE9 RC.

#yourfooter
{
column-count: 3;
}

If your target group ain't likely to have any modern browser with CSS3 support, i would personally take the easy shortcut, by making a couple of div's holding the content.

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Thanks. Good to know this will be easier in the future! –  Matt McDonald Feb 22 '11 at 23:43

I found a way... CSS only, using the nth-child selector. (This will probably have trouble on older browsers).

See the demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/MYB7g/3/

Here's the relevant CSS:

ul {
    white-space: nowrap;
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    margin-bottom: 100px;  /* space the two demos apart */
}

li {
    width: 180px;
    height: 30px;
    background-color: rgba(0,0,255,.5);
    color: white;
    padding: 5px;
    margin: 0px;
    border-radius: 8px;
    font-family: Helvetica;
    font-size: 24px;
    line-height: 30px;
    display: inline-block;
}


/******************************************/
/*  N = 2                                 */
/******************************************/

ul.rows2 {
    margin-left: 180px; /* li.width * (N-1) */
}

ul.rows2 li {
    margin-left: -180px; /* -(li.width * (N-1)) */
}

ul.rows2 li:nth-child(even) {
    background-color: rgba(255,0,255,.5);
    position: relative;
    top: 50px;        /* li.height + vertical spacing */
    left: -195px;     /* -(li.width + horizontal spacing */

    margin-left: 0px;
}

/******************************************/
/*  N = 3                                 */
/******************************************/

ul.rows3 {
    margin-left: 360px; /* li.width * (N-1) */
}

ul.rows3 li {
    margin-left: 0px;
}

ul.rows3 li:nth-child(3n+1) { /* top */
    margin-left: -360px; /* -(li.width * (N-1)) */
}

ul.rows3 li:nth-child(3n+2) { /* second */
    background-color: rgba(255,0,0,.5);
    position: relative;
    top: 50px;        /* li.height + vertical spacing */
    left: -195px;     /* -(li.width + horizontal spacing */
}

ul.rows3 li:nth-child(3n+3) { /* bottom */
    background-color: rgba(255,0,255,.5);
    position: relative;
    top: 100px;       /* 2*(li.height + vertical spacing */
    left: -390px;     /* -2*(li.width + horizontal spacing */
}
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I'll note that this solution uses a specific number of items per column. If you still want it to flow vertically to fill an arbitrary height, and then wrap to the next column, I don't know how to do that. –  Malcolm Dwyer Aug 2 '11 at 21:33

There is now a CSS only solution for this issue. CSS3's flex box model achieves the desired effect with CSS alone.

ul {
    display: flex;
    flex-flow: column wrap;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/2Dr6E/

This will make ul's content (the li tags) flow from top to bottom, and then left to right once it fills the ul's height.

This is supported in most recent browsers Chrome, Opera, Firefox, and IE11 - as well as Safari and (with -webkit- prefix) and IE10 with (-ms- prefix).

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