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I have this FrameLayout:

<FrameLayout
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:id="@+id/searchresult_picture_layout"
    android:background="@drawable/img_bkgd_results_patch">

    <ProgressBar
        android:layout_width="20dp"
        android:layout_height="20dp"
        android:layout_gravity="center"
        android:id="@+id/searchresult_progressbar"
        android:indeterminate="true"
        android:visibility="gone"/>

    <ImageView
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:id="@+id/searchresult_picture"
        android:layout_gravity="center"
        android:scaleType="centerCrop"/>
</FrameLayout>

And I only want the FrameLayout to be as big as the background I'm passing it. If the ImageView is larger than the background for FrameLayout, I want the ImageView to be scaled to fit, not stretch the layout.

I attempted to make a custom layout, but I think I'm really. Here's where I got to:

public class PolaroidFrameLayout extends FrameLayout {

public PolaroidFrameLayout(Context context) {

    super( context );
}

public PolaroidFrameLayout(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {

    super( context, attrs );
}

public PolaroidFrameLayout(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, int defStyle) {

    super( context, attrs, defStyle );
}

@Override
protected void onMeasure( int widthMeasureSpec, int heightMeasureSpec ) {

    Drawable background = getBackground();
    int backgroundWidth = background.getMinimumWidth();
    int backgroundHeight = background.getMinimumHeight();

    setMeasuredDimension( backgroundWidth, backgroundHeight );

    for (int i = 0; i < getChildCount(); i++) {

        View v = getChildAt( i );
        int viewWidth = v.getWidth();
        int viewHeight = v.getHeight();

        v.measure( MeasureSpec.makeMeasureSpec( Math.min( backgroundWidth, viewWidth ), MeasureSpec.AT_MOST ), MeasureSpec.makeMeasureSpec( Math.min( backgroundHeight, viewHeight ), MeasureSpec.AT_MOST ) );
    }
}

}

The layout stays the size I want, but the children are never drawn. What else do I need to override for this to work?

Thanks for any input.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In onMeasure() you need to measure the children yourself. You must call measure() on each child.

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I tried that, but they still didn't show. I'm going to edit my original post so you can see the code I tried. –  Jason Robinson Feb 23 '11 at 15:53
    
Because you wrote Math.min( backgroundWidth, viewWidth ). The view's width and height is always 0 before the first layout pass. So you are telling the children to be at most 0. –  Romain Guy Feb 23 '11 at 17:07
    
Hmm, so you're right. Well getWidth returns 0, getMeasuredWidth returns 0...how do I get the width and height then? I can see from debugging that mWidth and mHeight have valid values, but what access method returns those values. –  Jason Robinson Feb 23 '11 at 17:16
    
You don't, the whole point of calling measure() is to compute the width and height. You can't have the measure() method rely on getWidth and getHeight. –  Romain Guy Feb 23 '11 at 19:07
    
I'm a little confused on what to pass in then. Part of the MeasureSpec is size. If I can't access any size components of the view, then what does it expect me to pass in? –  Jason Robinson Feb 23 '11 at 19:32
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It seems to me that a simpler solution would be to determine the background size and code that in to the width of the parent layout directly using

android:layout_width="100dp"

Where 100 is the width of your medium res version of the image. Is there a reason the hard-coding approach wouldn't work for you?

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Because I need this to be reusable. I need this in a couple of places, and the background image is different in each case. Also, wouldn't that cause adverse effects between lo, medium, and hi density images? –  Jason Robinson Feb 23 '11 at 15:30
    
It shouldn't. Your images for high, medium, and low should all be relative to dp anyway. So if you have a 100px medium image, that should be a 150px image in high res, which matches up to dp. I'd still go with that solution myself. Sometimes simple just outweighs conceptually ideal. ;) –  Micah Hainline Feb 23 '11 at 20:24
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try it like this:

<FrameLayout
android:layout_width="wrap_content"
android:layout_height="wrap_content"
android:id="@+id/searchresult_picture_layout">

<!-- background layer -->
<ImageView
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:src="@drawable/img_bkgd_results_patch">

<ProgressBar
    android:layout_width="20dp"
    android:layout_height="20dp"
    android:layout_gravity="center"
    android:id="@+id/searchresult_progressbar"
    android:indeterminate="true"
    android:visibility="gone"/>

<ImageView
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent"
    android:id="@+id/searchresult_picture"
    android:layout_gravity="center"
    android:scaleType="centerCrop"/>

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