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Probably a goofy question, but I can't seem to find anything in google land. I simply need one of my methods to ignore the case of the entered field. I am doing a city name match, but need both "Atlanta" and "atlanta" to be valid. How should I edit this to get the validation love that I need?

    jQuery.validator.addMethod("atlanta", function(value) {
    return value == "Atlanta"; //Need 'atlanta' to work too
}, '**Recipient must reside in Chicago City Limits**');

Pre thanks to any and all :)

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted
jQuery.validator.addMethod("atlanta", function(value) {
    return value.toLowerCase() == "atlanta"; 
}, '**Recipient must reside in Chicago City Limits**');
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Super fast answer Alex! Awesome and thanks this worked perfectly. Always seems obvious once someone shows you how it's done :) –  Jamie Feb 23 '11 at 0:20
    
@Jamie No worries, happy coding! –  alex Feb 23 '11 at 0:33

The easiest way to get a case-insensitive match is to convert both values to uppercase and then compare (uppercase because in certain cultures/languages the upper- to lowercase conversion can change a character!).

So make the check

value.toUpperCase() == "Atlanta".toUpperCase()
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This is a great solution. Tested it as well and think I'll stick to it. Most people will Capitalize. –  Jamie Feb 23 '11 at 0:50
return value.toLowerCase() == "atlanta";
or use
return value.toLowerCase() == "Atlanta".toLowerCase();
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Thanks Amit! Perfect answer. Much appreciated. –  Jamie Feb 23 '11 at 0:51
return (value ? value.match(/atlanta/i) : null) != null

This is case insensitive and you can do lots of fun stuff with the regex. Enjoy. And please don't do "Cosntant".toLowerCase() there is just too much wrong in that.

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1  
I tried this (I'm curious and like to know every way to skin a cat), but I'm not getting any love. Why is the .toLowerCase() not the right way to go Dmitriy? –  Jamie Feb 23 '11 at 1:11

You could even create a more generic jQuery validation rule which can be reused to perform a case insensitive comparison like

$.validator.addMethod("equalToIgnoreCase", function (value, element, param) {
        return this.optional(element) || 
             (value.toLowerCase() == $(param).val().toLowerCase());
});

which can then be used for the following two sample inputs

<input type="text" name="firstname"/>
<input type="text" name="username"/>

like

$("form").validate({
    rules: {
        firstname: {
           equalToIgnoreCase: "input[name=username]"
        }
    },
    messages: {
        firstname: {
           equalToIgnoreCase: "The 'firstname' must match the 'username'"
        }
    });
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thanks, that's a more useful generic solution –  Timothy Aug 17 '12 at 12:23

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