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What might be wrong with this query:

select count(customer_email) as num_prev
  from _pj_cust_email_by_date
  where order_date < '2011-02'
  and customer_email is not null
  group by customer_email having count(order_date) > 0;

Which returns row results such as:

1
2
3
2
1
5
4

When I'm trying to get a full count of how many customers in total purchased during the specified date range?

_pj_cust_email_by_date is a view that returns only email address and order date in YYYY-MM-DD format. I do not have access to use anything save for this view.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to subquery it further

select count(*) CustomerCount
from (
    select count(customer_email) as num_prev
    from _pj_cust_email_by_date
    where order_date < '2011-02'
    and customer_email is not null
    group by customer_email having count(order_date) > 0;
) as innercount

That would normally be the approach, but since you're using having count(order_date) > 0, I think you only need

select count(distinct customer_email) as num_prev
from _pj_cust_email_by_date
where order_date < '2011-02' and customer_email is not null

Because the HAVING clause will never detail with empty order_dates which makes the HAVING clause a dud, actually.

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Even if this query is an inner-query? –  philwinkle Feb 22 '11 at 23:50
    
@philwinkle Yes, even if. So you put one level between this and the outer. –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 22 '11 at 23:52
    
In the subquery expression, the COUNT(customer_email) is redundant, as the outer query just counts the rows returned, you could just pass back customer_email, or even 1. –  Orbling Feb 23 '11 at 0:05
    
@Orbling - you're right. And I can almost guarantee that is exactly what MySQL will do to optimize it. The first query is there to show how to subquery for a count (overall) with an embedded HAVING against the inner query - I concede I could have cleaned up other aspects, but the final query is the latter one. –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 23 '11 at 0:07
    
aka cyberwiki: Yes, hopefully the engine should optimise that. Glad you retained the subquery, as that is a more generic way of handling the HAVING clause with a different group to the desired result aggregation. The final single query is peculiar to the question example. –  Orbling Feb 23 '11 at 0:14
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The GROUP BY is causing that.

It causes one result row to be returned per group, in this for each distinct value of customer_email.

If you want the total number of distinct email addresses, then you need to drop the GROUP BY clause and change the COUNT to COUNT(DISTINCT customer_email).

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So how, then, can I use the clause from HAVING... AFAIK I can't use the count() function in the WHERE clause... –  philwinkle Feb 22 '11 at 23:47
    
It seems as though I can use HAVING without the GROUP BY clause... I'm investigating this and I'll post my findings. –  philwinkle Feb 22 '11 at 23:51
    
@philwinkle: You need the subquery, see "Richard aka cyberkiwi"'s answer. –  Orbling Feb 22 '11 at 23:55
    
@philwinkle: You can use HAVING without GROUP BY, but the results will be different. The grouping directly effects the results of any aggregate function. –  Orbling Feb 22 '11 at 23:58
    
You are correct - this was the cause of the actual subject of the question. I'll vote this up - but the previous answer above went a step further and helped me get what I actually needed. –  philwinkle Feb 23 '11 at 1:31
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