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I have mac addresses in mac1.txt and mac2.txt and I wanted to do something like this:

v = File.open("/RubyDev/sort/mac1.txt",'r').each_line do |a|
      w = File.open("/RubyDev/sort/mac2.txt",'r').each_line do |b|
            if w in v
                puts w
            end
      end
end

Thanks in advance for your assistance!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT: That first version below is actually pretty terrible. Here's a better version:

lines = []

File.open("mac1.txt",'r').each_line do |a|
  lines.push(a.rstrip!)
end

File.open("mac2.txt",'r').each_line do |b|
  if lines.include?(b.rstrip!)
    puts b
  end
end

I think what you're looking for is something like this:

File.open("mac1.txt",'r').each_line do |a|
  File.open("mac2.txt",'r').each_line do |b|
    if a == b
      puts b
    end
  end
end

Is that correct? If not, could you give more background about the issue and what you're trying to accomplish?

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Array#include isn't very efficient. The hash-based solutions are superior. Also, you don't need the bang-method in the first file. –  Mark Thomas Feb 23 '11 at 1:03
    
Both fair points. I actually hadn't even considered the hash-based comparison idea until after I saw it. I'm pretty green when it comes to Ruby myself, so I didn't know that include? was inefficient. Thanks! –  Gavin Anderegg Feb 23 '11 at 1:07
    
it's not that include? is inefficient in itself, but scanning an array for a matching element is O(n) whereas hash lookup is O(1). –  Mark Thomas Feb 23 '11 at 2:18

To get all the common lines between two files, you can use File#readlines to access all the lines in the file as an array. Keep in mind that they will still have newlines ("\n") appended, so you'll need to remove them with String#chomp. The easiest way to do this is to map the array that readlines gives you, like this:

common_macs = File.open("mac1.txt").readlines.map(&:chomp) & 
  File.open("mac2.txt").readlines.map(&:chomp)
share|improve this answer
    
Good explanation, but I don't see how it computes the common macs. –  Wayne Conrad Feb 23 '11 at 0:33
    
Whoops, that should be &. –  harbichidian Feb 23 '11 at 0:35

I am still trying to learn Ruby, so this is unlikely a good solution, but it is a possibility. It reads the contents of the first file into a hash and then checks the contents of the second against it. I think it would be reasonably efficient (well ... unless the first file is too big to fit nicely in memory).

lines = Hash.new

File.open( "mac1.txt", 'r' ).each_line do |l|
    lines[l] = true
end

File.open( "mac2.txt", 'r' ).each_line do |l|
    if ( lines[l] == true )
        puts l
    end
end

Edit For completeness, here is the very succinct version as suggested in the comments by Mark Thomas with the white space removal suggested by Gavin Anderegg. Ruby is a sweet language.

lines = Hash.new
File.open( "mac1.txt", 'r' ).each_line {|l| lines[l.strip!] = true}
File.open( "mac2.txt", 'r' ).each_line {|l| puts l if lines[l.strip!]}
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1  
Not bad. Readmode is default, so you can replace the first section with File.open("mac1.txt").each_line {|l| lines[l] = true}. The second can be File.open("mac2.txt").each_line {|l| puts l if lines[l]} –  Mark Thomas Feb 23 '11 at 0:31
    
Huh! That's really neat! It still suffers from the "\n" v. "EOF" issue, though. Maybe something like this? 1: lines = Hash.new 2: File.open("mac1.txt").each_line {|l| lines[l.rstrip!] = true} 3: File.open("mac2.txt").each_line {|l| puts l if lines[l.rstrip!]} –  Gavin Anderegg Feb 23 '11 at 0:47
1  
@Gavin, I'd use lines[l.chomp] but that's just personal preference. –  Mark Thomas Feb 23 '11 at 0:54
    
@Mark, @Gavin: Thanks for the input. That's good information. I figured there was a cleaner looking solution. I really like Ruby because the solutions generally "feel" right and are still very readable. –  Mark Wilkins Feb 23 '11 at 1:43
lines = {}
File.open("mac1.txt").each_line {|l| lines[l.chomp] = true}
File.open("mac2.txt").each_line {|l| puts l if lines[l.chomp]}
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