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According to X.509 standard private key signature has to generate same encrypted message for ever?Am I right?

In order to avoid coping which data field in digital certificate will be changed?

they can't process the information of the user, but by coping the digital signature generated by private key and keeping along with the webpage attacker can say that I am certified by the CA and web browser will agree with that information.Is it true?

Version number,Serial number,Certificate algorithm identifier,Issuer name,Validity period,Subject name,Subject public key information Issuer unique identifier,Subject unique identifier,Extensions,Certification authority's digital signature. These are the fields in digital certificate,if this fields don't change for ever,encrypted value will be same for ever.If I go to gmail it sends Encrypted digital certificate.If I use that Encrypted digital certificate in my webpage cant I say I am owner of gmail.but I can't use information send by the user since I won't have private key

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A certificate must be signed by a CA in order to be considered as valid. The contents of the certificate is hashed, then encrypted by the CA's private key. Anyone can then validate whether the certificate is valid by decrypting the signature with the CA's public key, and verifying whether the hash matches.

The signature verifies that a particular name is associated with a particular public key - even if someone copied the certificate file verbatim, they wouldn't know the private key corresponding to that public key, and so they couldn't use it to impersonate the owner of the certificate.

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thanks for your reply.of course,they can't process the information of the user, but by coping the digital signature generated by private key and keeping along with the webpage attacker can say that I am certified by the CA and web browser will agree with that information.Is it true? –  sun Feb 23 '11 at 2:02
    
@sun: No, they can't. Without the associated private key the certificate is useless. –  Anon. Feb 23 '11 at 2:05
    
Version number,Serial number,Certificate algorithm identifier,Issuer name,Validity period,Subject name,Subject public key information Issuer unique identifier,Subject unique identifier,Extensions Certification authority's digital signature. These are the fields in digital certificate,if this fields don't change for ever,encrypted value will be same for ever.If I go to gmail it sends Encrypted digital certificate.If I use that Encrypted digital certificate in my webpage cant I say I am owner of gmail.but I can't use information send by the user since I won't have private key –  sun Feb 23 '11 at 2:33
    
@sun: No, it doesn't work that way. Suppose you claim to be the owner of gmail.com. So then a user opens a TLS connection to you. What are you going to do? You don't have the private key, so you can't complete your half of the TLS handshake and the user can't connect. –  Anon. Feb 23 '11 at 2:38
    
Thanks a lot.I am satisfied –  sun Feb 23 '11 at 3:58
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