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I want to place some annotations to the left of a topic using HTML and CSS (for example the 'status' and 'author' annotations shown in the following mockup/image):

example of desired layout

I prefer CSS instead of a table-based layout.

Annotations should be displayed before (to the left of) the heading, as shown above.

In the HTML, annotations should be located after the corresponding heading, e.g. as follows (because the information/contents associated with a topic are usually whatever is after the topic's heading):

<h1>This is a section title</h1>
<div class="status">approved</div>
<div class="author">chris</div>
<p>This is some text. Lorem ipsum.</p>
<p>Lorem ipsum.</p>
<h1>Different section title</h1>
<div class="status">rejected</div>
<p>Lorem ipsum.</p>

There are (at least) two possibilities:

Which of these (or any other answer) is the better way to implement this layout, and why?

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Do you have any specific browser requirements? (Basically, do you need to support IE 6, 7 or 8? Based on your references to HTML spec's I'm assuming you are more concerned with complying to the spec than worrying about browser deficiencies.) –  peteorpeter Feb 25 '11 at 3:32
    
@peteorpeter - Yes, I'm interested in the standards, and not in browser deficiencies. I prefer CSS2.1, but might also enjoy hearing of anything CSS3-specific. –  ChrisW Feb 25 '11 at 3:40
    
Why didn't you pick an answer... –  Hussein Mar 4 '11 at 3:08
    
@Hussein I didn't fully understand any answer. I apologise though, I should have come back sooner to discuss your answers with you. –  ChrisW Mar 4 '11 at 3:50

8 Answers 8

Use the solution with floats. Absolute positioning should not be used here, because text is being positioned, and the layout is dependent upon the size of the text. If your user changes his browser to magnify the text-size, the layout will become distorted. You need to be especially conscious of this if you are designing pages for accessibility (consider using % instead of px for the size as well), but in general, use absolute positioning only when it is the only way to do what you want.

A great resource for understanding how to correctly use floats is this smashing magazine article. I bookmarked it a while back and I use it as a reference.

share|improve this answer
    
@ChrisW From all the answers, this deserved the points ????. No offense smartcaveman. –  Hussein Mar 4 '11 at 3:10
    
Is there a 'solution with floats' which doesn't involve doing float:right on the title and content (i.e. on everything except the annotations)? Because doing float:right changes the behaviour of margin collapse (and I don't know what else). –  ChrisW Mar 4 '11 at 3:10
    
@Hussein It didn't totally deserve the points IMO (e.g. no working example) but the points were awarded automatically after a timeout. –  ChrisW Mar 4 '11 at 3:12
    
@Hussein, Yes, because I answered the question that was relevant to the bounty (being why are floats a better design than absolute positioning). That being said, I was not awarded the points by ChrisW, but I received half the points for having the highest number of votes when the bounty expired (Dagnabbit!) –  smartcaveman Mar 4 '11 at 3:13
    
@chrisW You should have picked an answer and gave credit for people who put efforts in there answers. –  Hussein Mar 4 '11 at 3:13

No need for position:absolute. float:left will work best for this situation. float:right is also not needed. This solution is cross browser compatible. It will work in all browsers including quirks mode. Let me know how this works for you or if you need any changes.

Check working example at http://jsfiddle.net/PyHGy/9

If HTML order is important to you where annotations must come after corresponding heading, then we need to add position:absolute to .statusContainer and then adjust the margin in .titleContainer. This is also a cross browser compatible solution.

Check working example at http://jsfiddle.net/PyHGy/8/

share|improve this answer
    
ChrisW wrote In the HTML, annotations should be located after the corresponding heading . In your HTML code, annotations are before the heading. –  FelipeAls Feb 27 '11 at 9:18
    
I updated my post an included another link where annotation is located after heading. jsfiddle.net/PyHGy/8 –  Hussein Feb 27 '11 at 10:23
    
@Hussein... very nicely done! –  Hristo Mar 3 '11 at 15:32
    
Thank you. I see you're using several extra divs: .container and .titleContainer as well as .statusContainer. –  ChrisW Mar 4 '11 at 2:58
    
These are used for styling and to ensure cross browser compatibility. –  Hussein Mar 4 '11 at 3:07

Yes, you can achieve what you're looking for with css, i.e.: floats. However, you're going to need to specify width for your block elements.

Play with it. At its simplest level, set all widths to 50% (maybe less depending on padding) and add float:left and float:right where applicable.

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2  
In addition, wrapping each "section" with a <div> and setting it's overflow: hidden; will keep the sections from falling into each other. –  Jeremy Heiler Feb 23 '11 at 2:21
    
@Jeremy Do you recommend overflow: hidden, or overflow: auto? The spec says that auto is UA-dependent. If there's a lot of annotation I don't want to hide it, I want to push down the section below it. –  ChrisW Feb 23 '11 at 5:48
    
It doesn't really matter if you don't have a height property set. However, I usually don't like scroll bars magically appearing so that's why I use hidden. quirksmode.org/css/overflow.html –  Jeremy Heiler Feb 23 '11 at 12:39
    
Can you comment on whether using float:left or using position:absolute is a better solution? –  ChrisW Feb 23 '11 at 22:58
    
@ChrisW, I gave an explanation of why a float is better than a div in this circumstance. In addition, you may run into some problems with small windows and different types of screens if you use the 'width:50%', as suggested above. Please see the article in my post for explanation on how to properly implement this. –  smartcaveman Mar 1 '11 at 15:26

Untested, but this should work. If it doesn't I can edit to fix.

HTML:

<div class="section">
  <h1>This is a section title</h1>
  <div class="info">
     <div class="status">approved</div>
     <div class="author">chris</div>
  </div>
  <div class="body">
    <p>This is some text. Lorem ipsum.</p>
    <p>Lorem ipsum.</p>
  </div>
</div>

CSS:

.section {
  overflow: auto; /* so that the height and width calculate floats properly, otherwise the height will be nothing since all elements are floating */
  width: 700px; /* or total width */
}

/* this could be simplified if you didn't want the <h1> right near the .info, by putting the <h1> inside .body and removing the .section h1 from this */
.section h1, .section .body {
  float: right; 
  width: 500px; /* whatever */
}

.section .info {
  float: left;
  width: 200px; /* whatever */
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works for some page widths but not others. If the total page width is less than 700 px then the info stays on the left but drops vertically to below the heading. If the total page width is greater than 1000px then the body jumps to the left-hand side instead of staying aligned under the heading. –  ChrisW Feb 23 '11 at 3:11
    
Using relative widths e.g. 20% and 80% avoids this problem. –  ChrisW Feb 23 '11 at 3:12
    
woops, fixed that :) –  Aaron Yodaiken Feb 23 '11 at 3:14
    
I didn't realize that the info would move upwards (or, that the heading would move downwards) so that the info and the heading are at the same vertical location. From which part/phrase of the CSS specification should I have predicted/expected that? –  ChrisW Feb 23 '11 at 4:08
    
That's how floats work. w3.org/TR/CSS21/visuren.html#float-position –  Aaron Yodaiken Feb 23 '11 at 4:21

I'm of the opinion that there is not a holistic "Right" answer here. There are a lot of good comments and examples in this post, as well as, pros and cons between float and position.

I offer a working example that relies on CSS inheritance (and float). It makes the HTML markup very trim, accessibility friendly, and very easy to read long after launch when editing/revisions come due. HTML follows:

<div class="author">
    <h3>This is a section title</h3>
    <span class="status">
        <p>(status: approved)</p>
        <p>(author: chris)</p>
    </span>
    <p>This is some text. Lorem ipsum. Lorem ipsum.</p>
</div>

Working code here: http://jsfiddle.net/kz8dG/4/.

share|improve this answer

As others said you should use float in this case. I think if you look at the code later it will be much easier to understand if you use floated elements.

I suggest you use liquid layout for this, not setting the width of the section to a constant px: http://jsfiddle.net/9j5jd/

Advantages of this solution:

  • The sections use 100%-(width of status text) width of the container
  • Order of html elements are unchanged

You may set the status width to %, or em, I used 150px. I didn't set a constant height to sections, you may do that if you want to.

Codes (same as jsfiddle): HTML:

<div class="section">
    <div class="header"><h1>This is a section title</h1></div>
    <div class="status">approved</div>
    <div class="author">chris</div>
    <div class="content"><div class="inner">
        <p>This is some text. Lorem ipsum.This is some text. Lorem ipsum.This is some text. Lorem ipsum.This is some text. Lorem ipsum.This is some text. Lorem ipsum.This is some text. Lorem ipsum.</p>
        <p>Lorem ipsum.</p>
        </div></div>
</div>
<div class="section">
    <div class="header"><h1>Different section title</h1></div>
    <div class="status">rejected</div>
    <div class="content"><div class="inner">
        <p>Lorem ipsum.</p>
        </div></div>
</div>

CSS:

/* Position */
.header, .content {
    float: right;
    width: 100%;
    margin-left: -150px;
}
h1, .inner {
    margin-left: 150px;
}
h1 {
    clear: both; 
}
.status, .author {
    float: left;
    width: 130px;  
    clear: left;
    text-align: right;
    padding-right: 20px;
}

/* Decoration */
h1 {
    color: #365F91;
    font-size: 1.2em;
    margin-bottom: 0.3em;
    font-weight: bold;
}
.status, .author {
    font-size: 0.8em; 
}
.status:before {
    content:"(status: ";
}
.author:before {
    content:"(author: ";    
}
.status:after, .author:after {
    content:")";
}
.section {
    float: left;
    margin-top: 0.5em; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Using float right means that margins between floated-right elements don't collapse as they usually would; and, you have an extra .content div to wrap the content to ensure that all the content is floated right. Whereas with stackoverflow.com/questions/5086298/… I just position the .info to the left, and the layout of the rest (including margin collapse) is unaffected (except pushed to the right using left-margin). –  ChrisW Mar 4 '11 at 3:05

Here's a solution based on aharon's answer. This is a slight refinement, which:

  • Uses the .section > * child selector to float everything right (which removes the need to explicitly reference the .section h1 heading element[s], and the .section .body div)

  • Removes the <div class="body"> from the HTML

  • Adds .section > *:first-child { margin-top: 0 } so that the heading and the .info have the same margin-top value (any such margin should be applied to the .section instead of only to the heading)

Here's the code:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
    <style type="text/css">
    .section
        {   overflow: auto; }
    .section > *
        {
            float: right;
            width: 80%; /* whatever */
        }
    .section > *:first-child 
        {
            margin-top: 0
        }
    .section .info
        {   float: left;   width: 20%; /* whatever */ }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
<div class="section">
    <h1>This is a section title</h1>
    <div class="info">
        <div class="status">approved</div>
        <div class="author">chris</div>
    </div>
    <p>This is some text. Lorem ipsum.</p>
    <p>Lorem ipsum.</p>
</div>
<div class="section">
    <h1>Next section title</h1>
    <div class="info">
        <div class="status">rejected</div>
    </div>
    <p>This is some text. Lorem ipsum.</p>
    <p>Lorem ipsum.</p>
</div>
</body>
</html>

Or use absolute widths, as shown in aharon's answer, instead of relative widths.

share|improve this answer

Unfortunately, using float to move most of the content to the right, as shown in other answers, has an unwanted side-effect: it prevents the usual 'margin collapse', which happens to elements which are in the normal flow but which does not happen to floated elements.

An alternative is as follows.

Create a large margin using margin-left (don't use left because that would result in the block being too wide, overflowing the edge on the right-hand side; whereas increasing the margin makes a corresponding decrease to the content area). And, specify relative positioning (with a zero left/right/top/bottom offset) to create/start a new stacking context, so that the .section .info will be positioned relative to each .section:

.section
    {
        overflow: visible;
        position: relative;
        margin-left: 200px;
    }

Use absolute positioning to place the .section .info to the left and top of its containing block:

.section .info
    {
        position: absolute;
        top: 0px;
        left: -200px;
        width: 180px;
        height: 100%
        text-align: right;
        font-size: smaller;
    }

The absolute positioning of the .section .info takes it out of the normal flow, and margins collapse between the <h1> and the <p>.

Here's the complete example:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="./user.css" /> 
    <style type="text/css">
    .section
        {
            overflow: visible;
            position: relative;
            margin-left: 200px;
        }
    .section > *:first-child 
        {
            margin-top: 0
        }
    .section .info
        {
            position: absolute;
            top: 0px;
            left: -200px;
            width: 180px;
            height: 100%
            text-align: right;
            font-size: smaller;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
<div class="section">
    <h1>1st section title</h1>
    <div class="info">
        <div class="status">approved</div>
        <div class="author">chris</div>
    </div>
    <p>This is some text. Lorem ipsum.</p>
    <p>Lorem ipsum.</p>
    <p>Lorem ipsum.</p>
    <p>Lorem ipsum.</p>
</div>
</body>
</html>
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