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I can't fit the question into one sentence so I will give an example. Say you have the following tables in your database:

Users(id, name)
Friends(id1, id2)

Friends(id1) and Friends(id2) are both foreign keys that reference Users(id). What would the query look like to get the user id on one side and all friends on the other side. The data in the friends table looks something like this:

id1 id2
-------
 1  2
 1  3
 1  4
 2  3
 2  4
 2  5
 5  1

And I want an output like this:

id1 id2
-------
 1  2
 1  3
 1  4
 1  5
 2  1
 2  3
 2  4
 2  5
 3  1
 3  2
 4  1
 4  2
 5  1
 5  2

All user IDs should be on the left and the friends of that user ID should all be on the right. I think I have to do some sort of cross product but I can't get the correct output. Any ideas how to do this? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
It is common to create 2 relationship records in the friendship tables (for each side). In this case you never had such problems. –  zerkms Feb 23 '11 at 4:23
    
@zerkms So the table would always be twice as big as needed? –  styfle Feb 23 '11 at 4:27
    
Technically, yes, with the added benefit of being more efficient for looking up friendships. –  mellamokb Feb 23 '11 at 4:33
    
yes, and it is better than query with with + union and 2 inner join –  zerkms Feb 23 '11 at 5:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

union together the combinations of id1,id2 with id2,id1:

;with FriendShips as (
    select
        id1, id2
    from
        Friends F1

    union

    select
        id2, id1
    from
        Friends F2
)
select
    u1.name, u2.name
from
    FriendShips F
inner join
    Users u1 on F.id1 = u1.id
inner join
    Users u2 on F.id2 = u2.id
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Why do you use WITH? I've never seen that before. This query seemed to get the same result: SELECT u1.name AS UserName, u2.name AS FriendName FROM (SELECT f.id1, f.id2 FROM friends f UNION SELECT f.id2, f.id1 FROM friends f) RIGHT OUTER JOIN users u1 ON u1.id=id1 RIGHT OUTER JOIN users u2 ON u2.id=id2; –  styfle Feb 23 '11 at 4:57
2  
@styfle: with is like a subquery, except that it is written top-down, instead of inside-out. It can be easier to read in certain scenarios, but it is functionally equivalent to a subquery AFAIK. –  mellamokb Feb 23 '11 at 4:59

This should do it

select id1, id2
from friends
union
select id2, id1
from friends

Beat by 38 secs... I'll throw an explanation then. If a is a friend of b, and it is stored as (a,b), you select the columns in reverse order (b,a), so that you end up with both variations in the union result.

Union = performs a distinct
Union All = keeps duplicate results

Using Union allows you to sometimes store (a,b) as well as (b,a) and this query will still show the combination only twice, in both a-b and b-a orientations.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Now how would I replace the ids with the user names? –  styfle Feb 23 '11 at 4:40
    
I think I figured it out: SELECT u1.name AS UserName, u2.name AS FriendName FROM (SELECT f.id1, f.id2 FROM friends f UNION SELECT f.id2, f.id1 FROM friends f) RIGHT OUTER JOIN users u1 ON u1.id=id1 RIGHT OUTER JOIN users u2 ON u2.id=id2; –  styfle Feb 23 '11 at 4:45

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