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I'm a new Java programmer, and I've been trying to setup a simple Swing program that allows a user to input two integers into JTextFields and when an "add" JButton is clicked the two numbers are added together and the sum is output in a JLabel.

This I can handle, however, where I'm running into difficulty is being able to setup the two JTextFields to consider invalid numbers as zero. For instance, if the character(s) "x" or "xxx" were entered this would cause the value of that JTextField to be 0 for the purposes of the addition. So far I have used try/catch and if/else statements without any success. I have also scoured the Internet for hours over the past two days looking for some solutions for this problem with no results.

Any help would be greatly appreciated! The code I have so far is listed below...

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;


public class Adder extends JPanel implements ActionListener {

   JButton addBut = new JButton("Add");
   JTextField field1 = new JTextField("Number 1"),
   field2 = new JTextField("Number 2");
   JLabel numSum = new JLabel("=");

       Adder() {
             this.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(299, 43));
             addBut.addActionListener(this);
             setLayout(new FlowLayout());
             add(field1);
             add(field2);
             add(numSum);
             add(addBut);            
       }

        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae) {
           if(ae.getSource().equals(addBut)){

             try {
                double one = Double.parseDouble(field1.getText());
                double two = Double.parseDouble(field2.getText());
                numSum.setText("" + (one + two));
             }           

                catch(Exception ex) {
             }
        } 

                else {
                    field1.setText(" ");
                    field2.setText(" ");
                    numSum.setText("");
             }
        }

                public static void main(String[] args){
                   JFrame jf=new JFrame();
                   jf.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
                   Adder x = new Adder();
                   jf.add(x);
                   jf.pack();
                   jf.setVisible(true);
              }
        }
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4 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Try

double one = 0.0;
double two = 0.0;
 try {
   one = Double.parseDouble(field1.getText());
 }
 catch(Exception ex) {
    field1.setText("0");
 }

 try {
    two = Double.parseDouble(field2.getText());
 }
 catch(Exception ex) {
   field2.setText("0");
 }

numSum.setText("" + (one + two));
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Thank you very much! This was a lot of help! –  astroDude1 Feb 24 '11 at 1:32
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Use JFormattedTextFiled and set NumberFormat to allow only valid numbers.

Or in your code add some processing of thrown exception in

double one = Double.parseDouble(field1.getText());                 
double two = Double.parseDouble(field2.getText()); 

Show a message that one or two is incorrect in your catch block.

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Here is the example of creating a text field for numbers using JFormattedTextField.

Another is showing how InputVerifier works.

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Good information, and an excellent link. Thank you! –  astroDude1 Feb 24 '11 at 1:32
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You have several problems here.

First of all, never, ever "swallow" exceptions by providing an empty catch block. It is not a good idea at all. At the very least, if the exception isn't expected, then just print stack trace using the printStackTrace(), or (better) a logger. If the exception is expected (like in your case), do something meaningful. In your case, if you really want to treat invalid numbers as zero (which is not a good idea either), then you should probably do this:

  double one;
  double two;
  try {
    one = Double.parseDouble(field1.getText());
  }
  catch(NumberFormatException ex) {
    one = 0.0;
  }
  try {
    two = Double.parseDouble(field2.getText());
  }
  catch(NumberFormatException ex) {
    two = 0.0;
  }
  numSum.setText("" + (one + two));

Of course, you could have achieved the same result by first initializing both variables to zero, then just "swallowing" the exceptions. But that is less readable, as you don't see right away when exactly zero is supposed to be used. Another problem with that approach is that if there are other code paths that don't assign anything to one and two, then the compiler won't emit a "possibly uninitialized variable error".

Second, as you can see, you need two try/catch blocks here. That's why these actions are independent, and you still want the second one to run even if the first one fails. With single try block it stops executing as soon as it breaks, which could leave your second variable unchanged because the first one is malformed.

Third, never catch the "Exception" class or above, except maybe in the main() method or in the run() method of a thread. And never catch the "Throwable" even there, as errors aren't supposed to be caught. In this particular case you're interested in malformed numbers, so the NumberFormatException is the right thing to catch. You don't care about other exceptions here, and you certainly don't want the texts to be treated as zero numbers if there is some different problem.

And finally, not really on topic, but the if(ae.getSource().equals(addBut)) thing is really redundant here. You don't subscribe to any other actions, so your else block won't ever get executed. And even if you did subscribe to other actions, it would probably be much better idea to create separate listeners using inner classes for each of the actions, not to put everything in one big listener with lots of ifs.

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You make a lot of excellent points here. I'm relatively new to Java (especially Swing), so I'm kind of muddling through some of this stuff. Definitely, there is a lot of room for optimization and cleaner coding in the above program using the methods you described. Thanks again for your help! –  astroDude1 Feb 24 '11 at 1:35
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