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Is it possible I make a simple query to count how many records I have in a determined period of time like a Year, month or day, having a TIMESTAMP field, like:

SELECT COUNT(id)
FROM stats
WHERE record_date.YEAR = 2009
GROUP BY record_date.YEAR

Or even:

SELECT COUNT(id)
FROM stats
GROUP BY record_date.YEAR, record_date.MONTH

To have a monthly statistic.

Thanks!

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1  
I guess it's supposed to be GROUP BY record_date.MONTH in your first code snippet? –  chiccodoro Oct 6 '10 at 8:34

9 Answers 9

up vote 425 down vote accepted
GROUP BY YEAR(record_date), MONTH(record_date)

Check out the date and time functions in MySQL.

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2  
You may want to add an extra column for added clarity in some cases such as where records span several years. SELECT COUNT(event_id), DATE_FORMAT(event_start, '%Y/%m') –  Richard Le Poidevin Apr 4 '13 at 10:25
GROUP BY DATE_FORMAT(record_date, '%Y%m')

Note (primarily, to potential downvoters). Presently, this may not be as efficient as other suggestions. Still, I leave it as an alternative, and a one, too, that can serve in seeing how faster other solutions are. (For you can't really tell fast from slow until you see the difference.) Also, as time goes on, changes could be made to MySQL's engine with regard to optimisation so as to make this solution, at some (perhaps, not so distant) point in future, to become quite comparable in efficiency with most others.

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I have a feeling that this would not perform well because a format function wouldn't be able to use an index on the date column. –  Sonny Oct 10 '11 at 13:09
10  
I like your addendum +1 for diligence and thoughtfulness –  oodavid Jun 18 '12 at 17:02
    
This one just made my day ! thanks ! –  Stv Mar 26 '13 at 11:18
    
@Stv: You might want to consider @fu-chi's answer then. As far as I can tell, the grouping expressions in both that answer and mine evaluate to the same thing but EXTRACT() may be more efficient than DATE_FORMAT(). (I don't have a MySQL for proper testing, though.) –  Andriy M Mar 26 '13 at 12:23
3  
I up voted..I could use date_format in the select field instead of the group by, select DATE_FORMAT(record_date, '%Y/%m'), count(id) from stats GROUP BY YEAR(record_date), MONTH(record_date) to get [2009/01, 10] formatted output. –  so_mv Sep 23 '13 at 22:19

I tried using the 'WHERE' statement above, I thought its correct since nobody corrected it but I was wrong; after some searches I found out that this is the right formula for the WHERE statement so the code becomes like this:

SELECT COUNT(id)  
FROM stats  
WHERE YEAR(record_date) = 2009  
GROUP BY MONTH(record_date)
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10  
Actually you can omit YEAR(record_date) from GROUP BY since you are limiting the data to a single year. –  Andriy M Apr 23 '11 at 19:17

try this one

SELECT COUNT(id)
FROM stats
GROUP BY EXTRACT(YEAR_MONTH FROM record_date)

EXTRACT(unit FROM date) function is better as less grouping is used and the function return a number value.

Comparison condition when grouping will be faster than DATE_FORMAT function (which return a string value). Try using function|field that return non-string value for SQL comparison condition (WHERE, HAVING, ORDER BY, GROUP BY).

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If you want to group by date in MySQL then use the code below:

 SELECT COUNT(id)
 FROM stats
 GROUP BY DAYOFMONTH(record_date)

Hope this saves some time for the ones who are going to find this thread.

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3  
It's important to note that you'd also need to group by MONTH(record_date) as well to account for multiple months. –  Webnet Oct 19 '12 at 0:38

If your search is over several years, and still want to group monthly, i suggest:

version #1:

SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE YEAR(record_date), MONTH(record_date), COUNT(*)
FROM stats
GROUP BY DATE_FORMAT(record_date, '%Y%m')


version #2: (more efficient)

SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE YEAR(record_date), MONTH(record_date), COUNT(*)
FROM stats
GROUP BY YEAR(record_date)*100 + MONTH(record_date)


I compared those 2 versions on big table with 1357918 rows (InnoDB), and the 2nd version appear to have better results.

version1: average of 10 executes: 1.404 seconds
version2: average of 10 executes: 0.780 seconds

(SQL_NO_CACHE key added to prevent the MySQL from CACHING to queries)

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Consider including @fu-chi's suggestion into your tests, it may prove even more efficient. Also, you tested GROUP BY YEAR(record_date)*100 + MONTH(record_date), but why not test GROUP BY YEAR(record_date), MONTH(record_date) as well? –  Andriy M May 22 at 9:31

If you want to filter records for a particular year (e.g. 2000) then optimize the WHERE clause like this:

SELECT MONTH(date_column), COUNT(*)
FROM date_table
WHERE date_column >= '2000-01-01' AND date_column < '2001-01-01'
GROUP BY MONTH(date_column)
-- average 0.016 sec.

Instead of:

WHERE YEAR(date_column) = 2000
-- average 0.132 sec.

The results were generated against a table containing 300k rows and index on date column.

As for the GROUP BY clause, I tested the three variants against the above mentioned table; here are the results:

SELECT YEAR(date_column), MONTH(date_column), COUNT(*)
FROM date_table
GROUP BY YEAR(date_column), MONTH(date_column)
-- codelogic
-- average 0.250 sec.

SELECT YEAR(date_column), MONTH(date_column), COUNT(*)
FROM date_table
GROUP BY DATE_FORMAT(date_column, '%Y%m')
-- Andriy M
-- average 0.468 sec.

SELECT YEAR(date_column), MONTH(date_column), COUNT(*)
FROM date_table
GROUP BY EXTRACT(YEAR_MONTH FROM date_column)
-- fu-chi
-- average 0.203 sec.

The last one is the winner.

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If you want to get a monthly statistics with row counts per month of each year ordered by latest month, then try this:

SELECT count(id),
      YEAR(record_date),
      MONTH(record_date) 
FROM `table` 
GROUP BY YEAR(record_date),
        MONTH(record_date) 
ORDER BY YEAR(record_date) DESC,
        MONTH(record_date) DESC
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The correct answer to this question was posted almost 5 years ago.. –  OGHaza Nov 22 '13 at 0:21
    
Oops, sorry about that, I'm new on stackoverflow. In any case it's a nice quick snippet of code. :) –  user3019799 Nov 23 '13 at 19:02

Throwing a few extra answers into the ring that may perform better and make use of string/date conversion on DATE.

One year group:

SELECT COUNT(id)
  FROM stats
 WHERE record_date >= '2009' 
   AND record_date < '2010';

Multiple years grouped by month:

  SELECT COUNT(id)
    FROM stats
GROUP BY LEFT(record_date,7);
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