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Simple question. I have an mvc controller that has method:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult SubmitAction()
{
     // Get Post Params Here
 ... return something ...
}

The form is a non-trivial form with a simple textbox.

Question - how on earth do I access the parameter values? I am not posting from a View, the post is coming externally. I'm assuming there is a collection of key/value pairs I have access to. I tried Request.Params.Get("simpleTextBox"); but it returns error "Sorry, an error occurred while processing your request.".

I'm sure there's a simple answer to this.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 60 down vote accepted

You could have your controller action take an object which would reflect the form input names and the default model binder will automatically create this object for you:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult SubmitAction(SomeModel model)
{
    var value1 = model.SimpleProp1;
    var value2 = model.SimpleProp2;
    var value3 = model.ComplexProp1.SimpleProp1;
    ...

    ... return something ...
}

Another (obviously uglier) way is:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult SubmitAction()
{
    var value1 = Request["SimpleProp1"];
    var value2 = Request["SimpleProp2"];
    var value3 = Request["ComplexProp1.SimpleProp1"];
    ...

    ... return something ...
}
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These worked! :) Thanks so much!!! –  Richard Feb 23 '11 at 8:43

Simply, you can use FormCollection like,

[HttpPost] 
public ActionResult SubmitAction(FormCollection collection)
{
     // Get Post Params Here
 string var1 = collection["var1"];
}

you can also use a class, that is mapped with Form values, and asp.net mvc engine automagically filled it.

//Defined in another file
class MyForm
{
  public string var1 {get; set;}
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult SubmitAction(MyForm form)
{      
  string var1 = form1.Var1;
}
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Thank you as well ^^ –  Richard Feb 23 '11 at 9:50
    
+1..good answer. –  Matt Jan 30 '12 at 3:58

The answers are very good but there is another way in the latest release of MVC and .NET that I really like to use, instead of the "old school" FormCollection and Request keys.


Consider a HTML snipped contained within a form tag that either does an AJAX or FORM POST.

<input type="hidden"   name="TrackingID" 
<input type="text"     name="FirstName" id"firstnametext" />
<input type="checkbox" name="IsLegal" value="Do you accept terms and conditions?" />

Your controller will actually parse the form data and try to deliver it to you as parameters of the defined type. I included checkbox because it is a tricky one. It returns text "on" if checked and null if not checked. The requirement though is that these defined variables MUST exists (unless nullable) otherwise the AJAX or POST back will fail.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult PostBack(int TrackingID, string FirstName, string IsLegal){
    MyData.SaveRequest(TrackingID,FirstName, IsLegal == null ? false : true);
}

You can also post back a model without using any razor helpers. I have come across that this is needed some times.

public Class MyModel
{
  public int HouseNumber { get; set; }
  public string StreetAddress { get; set; }
}

The HTML markup will simply be ...

<input type="text" name="MyModel.HouseNumber" id="whateverid" >

and your controller will ask for the model.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult PostBack(MyModel postBack){
    postBack.HouseNumber; //The value user entered
    postBack.StreetAddress; //the default value of NULL.
}

When a controller is expecting a Model you do not have to define ALL the fields as the parser will just leave them at default, usually NULL. The nice thing is you can mix and match various models on the Markup and the post back parse will populate as much as possible. You do not need to define a model on the page or use any helpers.


It is recommended though to use a single model or a viewmodel per page. Mixing and matching as proposed is bad practice but it does demonstrate the power of the newest engine. So if you need to drop in something arbitrary or override another value from a Razor helper, or just do not feel like making your own helpers you can quickly use these methods to accept extra data.

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