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I am wondering what it would take to make something like this work:

using System;

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
    	var f = new IFoo { 
                    Foo = "foo",
                    Print = () => Console.WriteLine(Foo)
            };
    }
}

interface IFoo
{
    String Foo { get; set; }
    void Print();
}

The anonymous type created would look something like this:

internal sealed class <>f__AnonymousType0<<Foo>j__TPar> : IFoo
{
    readonly <Foo>j__TPar <Foo>i__Field;

    public <>f__AnonymousType0(<Foo>j__TPar Foo)
    {
        this.<Foo>i__Field = Foo;
    }

    public <Foo>j__TPar Foo
    {
        get { return this.<Foo>i__Field; }
    }

    public void Print()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(this.Foo);
    }
}

Is there any reason that the compiler would be unable to do something like this? Even for non-void methods or methods that take parameters the compiler should be able to infer the types from the interface declaration.

Disclaimer: While I do realize that this is not currently possible and it would make more sense to simply create a concrete class in this instance I am more interested in the theoretical aspects of this.

share|improve this question
    
This idea came to my mind yesterday and I tried to make a class Anonymous<T> and use Reflection.Emit to build such a class implementing the interface T. But it's tooooo expensive! Then I tried my luck on SO and found this question, do you have any progress by now? – Danny Chen Jan 23 '11 at 18:49

10 Answers 10

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There would be a few issues with overloaded members, indexers, and explicit interface implementations.

However, you could probably define the syntax in a way that allows you to resolve those problems.

Interestingly, you can get pretty close to what you want with C# 3.0 by writing a library. Basically, you could do this:

Create<IFoo>
(
    new
    {
        Foo = "foo",
        Print = (Action)(() => Console.WriteLine(Foo))
    }
);

Which is pretty close to what you want. The primary differences are a call to "Create" instead of the "new" keyword and the fact that you need to specify a delegate type.

The declaration of "Create" would look like this:

T Create<T> (object o)
{
//...
}

It would then use Reflection.Emit to generate an interface implementation dynamically at runtime.

This syntax, however, does have problems with explicit interface implementations and overloaded members, that you couldn't resolve without changing the compiler.

An alternative would be to use a collection initializer rather than an anonymous type. That would look like this:

Create
{
    new Members<IFoo>
    {
        {"Print", ((IFoo @this)=>Console.WriteLine(Foo))},
        {"Foo", "foo"}
    }
}

That would enable you to:

  1. Handle explicit interface implementation by specifying something like "IEnumerable.Current" for the string parameter.
  2. Define Members.Add so that you don't need to specify the delegate type in the initializer.

You would need to do a few things to implement this:

  1. Writer a small parser for C# type names. This only requires ".", "[]", "<>",ID, and the primitive type names, so you could probably do that in a few hours
  2. Implement a cache so that you only generate a single class for each unique interface
  3. Implement the Reflection.Emit code gen. This would probably take about 2 days at the most.
share|improve this answer
    
This was very much in the spirit of the question - thanks! – Andrew Hare Feb 5 '09 at 0:25

It requires c# 4, but the opensource framework impromptu interface can fake this out of the box using DLR proxies internally. The performance is good although not as good as if the change you proposed existed.

using ImpromptuInterface.Dynamic;

...

var f = ImpromptuGet.Create<IFoo>(new{ 
                Foo = "foo",
                Print = ReturnVoid.Arguments(() => Console.WriteLine(Foo))
            });
share|improve this answer

An anonymous type can't be made to do anything except to have read-only properties.

Quoting the C# Programming Guide (Anonymous Types):

"Anonymous types are class types that consist of one or more public read-only properties. No other kinds of class members such as methods or events are allowed. An anonymous type cannot be cast to any interface or type except for object."

share|improve this answer
3  
Yes, but I am hoping to revise that definition :) – Andrew Hare Feb 3 '09 at 21:07

As long as we're putting out an interface wish list, I'd really like to be able to tell the compiler that a class implements an interface outside the class definition- even in a separate assembly.

For example, let's say I'm working on a program to extract files from different archive formats. I want to be able to pull in existing implementations from different libraries — say, SharpZipLib and a commercial PGP implementation — and consume both libraries using the same code without creating new classes. Then I could use types from either source in generic constraints, for example.

Another use would be telling the compiler that System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer implements the System.Runtime.Serialization.IFormatter interface (it already does, but the compiler doesn't know it).

This could be used to implement your request as well, just not automatically. You'd still have to explicitly tell the compiler about it. Not sure how the syntax would look, because you'd still have to manually map methods and properties somewhere, which means a lot of verbiage. Maybe something similar to extension methods.

share|improve this answer
    
huh? "It already does, but the compiler doesn't know it" 1. No it doesn't. 2. It implements Serialize/Deserialize, but not the three properties Binder, Context, SurrogateSelector. – Szymon Rozga Feb 3 '09 at 21:07
    
Eh: you could shoehorn it in pretty easy. It should have been built so you could have a method that accepts IFormatter instance and pass BinaryFormatter, SoapFormatter, the existing XmlSerializer, or your own IFormatter implementation without complaint. – Joel Coehoorn Feb 3 '09 at 21:12
    
Do you know that Oxygene has this? I've also described a feature I'd like to see here. – Jordão Oct 26 '10 at 17:00
    
ImpromptuInterface can do this in c# 4. – jbtule Mar 8 '11 at 16:41

You could have something like anonymous classes in Java:

using System; 

class Program { 
  static void Main() { 
    var f = new IFoo() {  
      public String Foo { get { return "foo"; } } 
      public void Print() { Console.WriteLine(Foo); }
    }; 
  } 
} 

interface IFoo { 
  String Foo { get; set; } 
  void Print(); 
} 
share|improve this answer

Wouldn't this be cool. Inline anonymous class:

List<Student>.Distinct(new IEqualityComparer<Student>() 
{ 
    public override bool Equals(Student x, Student y)
    {
        return x.Id == y.Id;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode(Student obj)
    {
        return obj.Id.GetHashCode();
    }
})
share|improve this answer

I'm going to dump this here. I wrote it a while ago but IIRC it works OK.

First a helper function to take a MethodInfo and return a Type of a matching Func or Action. You need a branch for each number of parameters, unfortunately, and I apparently stopped at three.

static Type GenerateFuncOrAction(MethodInfo method)
{
    var typeParams = method.GetParameters().Select(p => p.ParameterType).ToArray();
    if (method.ReturnType == typeof(void))
    {
        if (typeParams.Length == 0)
        {
            return typeof(Action);
        }
        else if (typeParams.Length == 1)
        {
            return typeof(Action<>).MakeGenericType(typeParams);
        }
        else if (typeParams.Length == 2)
        {
            return typeof(Action<,>).MakeGenericType(typeParams);
        }
        else if (typeParams.Length == 3)
        {
            return typeof(Action<,,>).MakeGenericType(typeParams);
        }
        throw new ArgumentException("Only written up to 3 type parameters");
    }
    else
    {
        if (typeParams.Length == 0)
        {
            return typeof(Func<>).MakeGenericType(typeParams.Concat(new[] { method.ReturnType }).ToArray());
        }
        else if (typeParams.Length == 1)
        {
            return typeof(Func<,>).MakeGenericType(typeParams.Concat(new[] { method.ReturnType }).ToArray());
        }
        else if (typeParams.Length == 2)
        {
            return typeof(Func<,,>).MakeGenericType(typeParams.Concat(new[] { method.ReturnType }).ToArray());
        }
        else if (typeParams.Length == 3)
        {
            return typeof(Func<,,,>).MakeGenericType(typeParams.Concat(new[] { method.ReturnType }).ToArray());
        }
        throw new ArgumentException("Only written up to 3 type parameters");
    }
}

And now the method that takes an interface as a generic parameter and returns a Type that implements the interface and has a constructor (needs to be called via Activator.CreateInstance) taking a Func or Action for each method/ getter/setter. You need to know the right order to put them in the constructor, though. Alternatively (commented-out code) it can generate a DLL which you can then reference and use the type directly.

static Type GenerateInterfaceImplementation<TInterface>()
{
    var interfaceType = typeof(TInterface);
    var funcTypes = interfaceType.GetMethods().Select(GenerateFuncOrAction).ToArray();

    AssemblyName aName =
        new AssemblyName("Dynamic" + interfaceType.Name + "WrapperAssembly");
    var assBuilder = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.DefineDynamicAssembly(
            aName,
            AssemblyBuilderAccess.Run/*AndSave*/); // to get a DLL

    var modBuilder = assBuilder.DefineDynamicModule(aName.Name/*, aName.Name + ".dll"*/); // to get a DLL

    TypeBuilder typeBuilder = modBuilder.DefineType(
        "Dynamic" + interfaceType.Name + "Wrapper",
            TypeAttributes.Public);

    // Define a constructor taking the same parameters as this method.
    var ctrBuilder = typeBuilder.DefineConstructor(
        MethodAttributes.Public | MethodAttributes.HideBySig |
            MethodAttributes.SpecialName | MethodAttributes.RTSpecialName,
        CallingConventions.Standard,
        funcTypes);


    // Start building the constructor.
    var ctrGenerator = ctrBuilder.GetILGenerator();
    ctrGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
    ctrGenerator.Emit(
        OpCodes.Call,
        typeof(object).GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes));

    // For each interface method, we add a field to hold the supplied
    // delegate, code to store it in the constructor, and an
    // implementation that calls the delegate.
    byte methodIndex = 0;
    foreach (var interfaceMethod in interfaceType.GetMethods())
    {
        ctrBuilder.DefineParameter(
            methodIndex + 1,
            ParameterAttributes.None,
            "del_" + interfaceMethod.Name);

        var delegateField = typeBuilder.DefineField(
            "del_" + interfaceMethod.Name,
            funcTypes[methodIndex],
            FieldAttributes.Private);

        ctrGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
        ctrGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_S, methodIndex + 1);
        ctrGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Stfld, delegateField);

        var metBuilder = typeBuilder.DefineMethod(
            interfaceMethod.Name,
            MethodAttributes.Public | MethodAttributes.Virtual |
                MethodAttributes.Final | MethodAttributes.HideBySig |
                MethodAttributes.NewSlot,
            interfaceMethod.ReturnType,
            interfaceMethod.GetParameters()
                .Select(p => p.ParameterType).ToArray());

        var metGenerator = metBuilder.GetILGenerator();
        metGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);
        metGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Ldfld, delegateField);

        // Generate code to load each parameter.
        byte paramIndex = 1;
        foreach (var param in interfaceMethod.GetParameters())
        {
            metGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_S, paramIndex);
            paramIndex++;
        }
        metGenerator.EmitCall(
            OpCodes.Callvirt,
            funcTypes[methodIndex].GetMethod("Invoke"),
            null);

        metGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
        methodIndex++;
    }

    ctrGenerator.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);

    // Add interface implementation and finish creating.
    typeBuilder.AddInterfaceImplementation(interfaceType);
    var wrapperType = typeBuilder.CreateType();
    //assBuilder.Save(aName.Name + ".dll"); // to get a DLL

    return wrapperType;
}

You can use this as e.g.

public interface ITest
{
    void M1();
    string M2(int m2, string n2);
    string prop { get; set; }

    event test BoopBooped;
}

Type it = GenerateInterfaceImplementation<ITest>();
ITest instance = (ITest)Activator.CreateInstance(it,
    new Action(() => {Console.WriteLine("M1 called"); return;}),
    new Func<int, string, string>((i, s) => "M2 gives " + s + i.ToString()),
    new Func<String>(() => "prop value"),
    new Action<string>(s => {Console.WriteLine("prop set to " + s);}),
    new Action<test>(eh => {Console.WriteLine(eh("handler added"));}),
    new Action<test>(eh => {Console.WriteLine(eh("handler removed"));}));

// or with the generated DLL
ITest instance = new DynamicITestWrapper(
    // parameters as before but you can see the signature
    );
share|improve this answer

Interesting idea, I'd be a little concerned that even if it could be done it might get confusing. E.g. when defining a property with non-trivial setters and getters, or how to disambiguate Foo if the the declaring type also contained a property called Foo.

I wonder if this would be easier in a more dynamic language, or even with the dynamic type and DLR in C# 4.0?

Perhaps today in C# some of the intent could be achieved with lambdas:

void Main() {
    var foo = new Foo();
    foo.Bar = "bar";
    foo.Print = () => Console.WriteLine(foo.Bar);
    foo.Print();
}


class Foo : IFoo {
    public String Bar { get; set; }    
    public Action Print {get;set;}
}
share|improve this answer

This wouldn't be possible currently.

What would be the difference between this and simply making IFoo a concrete class instead? Seems like that might be the better option.

What it would take? A new compiler and tons of checks to ensure they didn't break the other features. Personally, I think it'd just be easier to require developers to just create a concrete version of their class.

share|improve this answer

I have used in Java the Amonimous Class through the "new IFoo(){...}" sintax and it's practical and easy when you have to quick implement a simple interface.

As a sample it would be nice to implement IDisposable this way on a legacy object used just one time instead of deriving a new class to implement it.

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