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I have a string (with multiple lines) which contains the following:

"Name=My name
Address=......
\##### To extract from here ####
line 1
line 2
line 3
\##### To extract till here ####
close"

How do I extract the lines between "##### To extract *" string including the pattern as well?

Output should be the following:

\##### To extract from here ####
line 1
line 2
line 3
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
pat = re.compile('\\\\##### To extract from here ####'
                 '.*?'
                 '(?=\\\\##### To extract till here ####)',
                 re.DOTALL)

or

pat = re.compile(r'\\##### To extract from here ####'
                 '.*?'
                 r'(?=\\##### To extract till here ####)',
                 re.DOTALL)
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Thanks a lot this worked. But without any back slashes in the pattern. –  Sandhya Feb 23 '11 at 9:44
    
@Sandhya If you write re.compile(r'##### To extract from here ####' ...etc the match will start at '##### To extract from here ####', not at '\##### To extract from here ####'. That's still good. On the contrary if you write '(?=##### To extract till here ####)' , the backslash character will be captured in the '.*?' part. It isn't what you want, as I understood. –  eyquem Feb 23 '11 at 10:04
    
+1 This solution probably is a bit slower than using str.find(), however, in practice this is only relevant in case of a very big search string or when the extraction is done many times. The advantage of regular expressions is that they are more flexible in detecting extraction markers. –  Oben Sonne Feb 23 '11 at 12:05
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You don't need regular expressions for that, a simple string.find would suffice.

Simply find both strings, and output the portion of the input between them (by slicing the string), taking care to avoid outputting the first string (i.e. noting its length).

Alternatively, you can use two calls to string.split.

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Ofir is right. Here's a corresponding example:

>>> s = """... your example string ..."""
>>> marker1 = "\##### To extract from here ####"
>>> marker2 = "\##### To extract till here ####"
>>> a = s.find(marker1)
>>> b = s.find(marker2, a + len(marker1))
>>> print s[a:b]
\##### To extract from here ####
line 1
line 2
line 3
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1  
If there is a line "\##### To extract till here ####" before the line "\##### To extract from here ####" , this code won't give the right thing. So you need to write b = ch.find("\##### To extract till here ####",a+32) –  eyquem Feb 23 '11 at 9:40
    
@eyquem: Right, I changed the code to handle this case. –  Oben Sonne Feb 23 '11 at 10:17
    
+1 because it's a good solution too, find() is a very fast function, and regexes are not absolutely always necessary –  eyquem Feb 23 '11 at 11:15
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>>> s
'\nName=My name\nAddress=......\n\\##### To extract from here ####\nline 1\nline 2\nline 3\n\\##### To extract till here ####\nclose'
>>> for o in s.split("\n"):
...     if "##" in o and not flag:
...        flag=1
...        continue
...     if flag and not "##" in o:
...        print o
...     if "##" in o and flag:
...        flag=0
...        continue
...
line 1
line 2
line 3
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