Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following two columns:

SELECT  b.ip_address AS IP ,b.mask AS MASK FROM interfaces b WHERE b.ip_address = 167804290;
+-----------+------------+
| IP        | MASK       |
+-----------+------------+
| 167804290 | 4294967168 | 
+-----------+------------+
Where is an actual IP address an its subnet mask
SELECT INET_NTOA(b.ip_address) AS IP,INET_NTOA(b.mask) AS MASK FROM interfaces b WHERE b.ip_address = 167804290;
+--------------+-----------------+ | IP | MASK | +--------------+-----------------+ | 10.0.125.130 | 255.255.255.128 | +--------------+-----------------+ 1 row in set (0.00 sec)
I am trying to find a way with mysql to grab the actual broadcast range which in this case is 10.0.125.255 or 167804415, but I can't see to find it. closest I gotten is
SELECT INET_NTOA(b.ip_address+(POWER(2,32)- b.mask - 1)) FROM interfaces b WHERE b.ip_address = 167804290; 
+---------------------------------------------------+
| INET_NTOA(b.ip_address+(POWER(2,32)- b.mask - 1)) |
+---------------------------------------------------+
| 10.0.126.1                                        | 
+---------------------------------------------------+
Only problem there is that is assuming that the column ip_address is the start of the subnet(10.0.125.128)

Any help will be appreciated.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The broadcast address is the complement of the subnet mask, OR'ed with the IP address.

SELECT INET_NTOA( ~b.mask & 0xffffffff | b.ip_address) 
FROM interfaces b 
WHERE b.ip_address = 167804290;

(You have to mask with "& 0xffffffff" because in MySQL, the bitwise complement operator returns a 64-bit value.)

share|improve this answer
    
great. Thanks for the quick answer. –  salparadise Feb 3 '09 at 22:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.