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I need to solve the following problem.

//pseudo algorithm

  • you have four elements: elm1, elm2, elm3, elm4
  • elm1 occurs 0-2 times
  • elm2 occurs 0-1 times
  • elm3 occurs 0-n times
  • elm4 occurs 0-n times
  • they can be ordered in any way, but occur restricted to their given count.

//pseudo end

It seems like a combination of sequence and choice, but both indicators have a characteristic, that don't allow me my desired behavior.

sample: elm4 elm1 elm2 elm1 elm3 elm3 elm3 elm4

please rescue me before I'll get insane :)

chris

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1  
You define this in your xsd schema and validate it against your xml. –  Carnotaurus Feb 23 '11 at 10:44
1  
It looks like your requirements can be ordered in any way and occur restricted to their given count are mutually exclusive. –  Filburt Feb 24 '11 at 14:58
    
Yes thats right, filburt. Is that possible? –  ChrisBenyamin Feb 25 '11 at 18:27
    
I don't think you can write XML Schema that would validate. You might be able to write an XSL that would output an indication if your rules are met. –  David W Mar 1 '11 at 5:03
    
W3C XML Schema is too poor in its support for unordered content to try this in. If it is theoretically possible, it would require some seriously contorted structures. If you have the possibility to use a different schema language, you might want to look into RELAX NG. –  G_H Mar 4 '11 at 18:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If your n values not too big and you're desperate you can make a content model that accounted for every possible combination, but that grows complex exponentially.

The best solution is to use a tool that supports XML Schema 1.1 (such as Xerces or Saxon), which relaxes restrictions on all group occurrence values. From section G.1.3 of the spec:

  1. Several of the constraints imposed by version 1.0 of this specification on all-groups have been relaxed:

    a. Wildcards are now allowed in all groups.

    b. The value of maxOccurs may now be greater than 1 on particles in an all group. The elements which match a particular particle need not be adjacent in the input.

    c. all groups can now be extended by adding more members to them.

Failing that, the general XML Schema 1.0 solution is to specify a relaxed model in the schema (no limits on the element occurrences) and then enforce the constraints you care about in another layer, which might be custom code or XSLT, for instance.

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No, I don't think this is possible. Your requirements seem mutually exclusive. You can either have:

Elements in any order but not more than one (or zero) of each type

<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
    <xs:element name="root">
        <xs:complexType>
            <xs:all>
                <xs:element name="elm1" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1" />
                <xs:element name="elm2" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1" />
                <xs:element name="elm3" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1"/>
                <xs:element name="elm4" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1"/>
            </xs:all>
        </xs:complexType>
    </xs:element>
</xs:schema>

<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<root>
    <elm4 />
    <elm1 />
    <elm3 />
</root>

or

Elements in fixed order and each with specific number of occurrences

<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
    <xs:element name="root">
        <xs:complexType>
            <xs:sequence>
                <xs:element name="elm1" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="2" />
                <xs:element name="elm2" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1" />
                <xs:element name="elm3" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded"/>
                <xs:element name="elm4" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="unbounded"/>
            </xs:sequence>
        </xs:complexType>
    </xs:element>
</xs:schema>

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<root>
    <elm1 />
    <elm1 />
    <elm2 />
    <elm4 />
    <elm4 />
    <elm4 />
    <elm4 />
</root>
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To your code with <all>: Is it possible to substitute <xs:element name="elm1" ..> with another complexType, which could be defined more flexible? my thought is: put a complexType (with occurance of 0 or 1), but this can have different sub-elements. –  ChrisBenyamin Feb 27 '11 at 19:37
    
@ChrisBenyamin No, that's not possible: The only allowed child elements of <xs:all> are <xs:element> and <xs:annotation>. –  Filburt Feb 28 '11 at 8:11
    
These are all nice approaches, but nothing what could solve my problem in any way. Hm.. Maybe I have to think the problem over. –  ChrisBenyamin Mar 3 '11 at 20:51

You can allways use the minOccurs and maxOccurs attributes in a XSD-schema. This will allow you to set the number of elements which are allowed in a specific element. More info in this tutorial

An example of how this is used in a choice-block is represented here, like this:

<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
elementFormDefault="qualified" attributeFormDefault="unqualified">
   <xs:element name="document">
      <xs:complexType>
         <xs:choice minOccurs="1" maxOccurs="unbounded">
            <xs:element name="A" minOccurs="1" maxOccurs="1"/>
            <xs:element name="B" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="3" />
            <xs:element name="C" minOccurs="0" maxOccurs="1"/>
         </xs:choice>
      </xs:complexType>
   </xs:element>
</xs:schema>
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That's only half the solution to the problem at hand. –  Filburt Feb 25 '11 at 22:23

It's not possible in xml-schema. You can use a choice in combination with something like schematron:

<schema xmlns="http://purl.oclc.org/dsdl/schematron">
<pattern>
    <title>Occurance rules</title>
    <rule context="elm1">
        <assert test="(count(//elm1) &gt; 0) and (count(//elm1) &lt; 3)">an error message</assert>
    </rule>
</pattern>

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1  
this doesn't help me out, because schematron is used in xsl. –  ChrisBenyamin Feb 26 '11 at 14:00

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