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I am looking to created batches from a Dictionary<string, DateTime> with the following constraints:

  1. All items in the batch much share the same date
  2. There can be no more than X items in a single batch. If there are more items with the same date, another batch must be created.

I have worked out the following logic, but was wondering if there was some other more succinct way of doing this with just linq.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace dictionary_sort_by_value_test
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int maxBatchSize = 3;

            Dictionary<string, DateTime> secs = new Dictionary<string, DateTime>();
            secs.Add("6571 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 10));
            secs.Add("6572 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 12));
            secs.Add("6573 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 12));
            secs.Add("6574 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 12));
            secs.Add("6575 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 10));
            secs.Add("6576 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
            secs.Add("6577 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
            secs.Add("6578 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
            secs.Add("6579 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));

            var sorted = secs.OrderBy(o => o.Value).GroupBy(o => o.Value);

            foreach (var date in sorted)
            {    
                Console.Write("\nNew batch at {0} \n", date.Key);
                int batchsize = 0;
                foreach (var sec in date)
                {
                    if (batchsize < maxBatchSize)
                    {
                        Console.Write("  {0} {1} \n", sec.Key, sec.Value);
                        batchsize++;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        Console.Write("\nNew batch at {0} \n", date.Key);
                        Console.Write("  {0} {1} \n", sec.Key, sec.Value);
                        batchsize = 1;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I don't see where/how you're creating a new batch in your code either. You're counting the number of batches but not every creating a new batch and adding it to your "result". Personally I the only way you could do this using only LINQ would be to have another tie-breaker so you can group by that as well. Or implement your logic as an Extension method on IEnumerable<T>. That way, it's look like LINQ, feel like LINQ and it will be LINQ since that's how LINQ is implemented anyway. –  Shiv Kumar Feb 23 '11 at 11:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You group by your key, then inside the result you group by the item index divided by the desired chunk size.

var chunkSize = 3;
var sorted = secs
    .OrderBy(kv => kv.Key)
    .GroupBy(o => o.Value)
    .Select(g => new {Chunks = g.Select((o,i) => new {Val = o, Index = i})
                                .GroupBy(item => item.Index / chunkSize)});

And displaying it:

 foreach(var item in sorted.SelectMany(item => item.Chunks))
 {
     Console.WriteLine("New batch at " + item.First().Val.Value);
     foreach(var element in item)
         Console.WriteLine(element.Val.Key);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This is precisely what I was looking for. –  Andre P. Feb 24 '11 at 1:26

Not strictly using linq to solve your problems but a more succinct way of handling the iteration:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int maxBatchSize = 3;

    Dictionary<string, DateTime> secs = new Dictionary<string, DateTime>();
    secs.Add("6571 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 10));
    secs.Add("6572 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 12));
    secs.Add("6573 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 12));
    secs.Add("6574 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 12));
    secs.Add("6575 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 10));
    secs.Add("6576 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
    secs.Add("6577 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
    secs.Add("6578 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
    secs.Add("6574 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
    secs.Add("6579 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
    secs.Add("6580 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
    secs.Add("6581 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
    secs.Add("6582 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));
    secs.Add("6583 JT", new DateTime(2011, 1, 11));

    secs.OrderBy(o => o.Value).GroupBy(o => o.Value).ToList().ForEach(date =>
                   {
                       Console.Write("\nNew batch at {0} \n", date.Key);
                       int batchsize = 0;
                       foreach (var sec in date)
                       {
                           if (batchsize >= maxBatchSize)
                           {
                               Console.Write("\nNew batch at {0} \n", date.Key);
                               batchsize = 0;
                           }

                           Console.Write("  {0} {1} \n", sec.Key, sec.Value);
                           batchsize++;
                       }
                   });

    Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this answer

You can do it with 2 GroupBys. First you group by DateTime, and then group by page. I had to specify the generic arguments explicitly, because the compiler was picking the wrong overload, and that made the query code longer.

var groups = secs.GroupBy<KeyValuePair<string, DateTime>, DateTime, string, Group>(
    p => p.Value,
    p => p.Key,
    (d, g) => new Group {
        Date = d,
        Pages = g.Select((s, i) => new KeyValuePair<string, int>(s, i / maxBatchSize))
            .GroupBy<KeyValuePair<string, int>, int, string, Page>(
                p => p.Value,
                p => p.Key,
                (p, g2) => new Page { Id = p, Items = g2.ToList() }) });

foreach (var group in groups)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Date: {0}", group.Date);
    foreach (var page in group.Pages)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Page: {0}", page.Id);
        foreach (var key in page.Items)
            Console.WriteLine(key);
    }
}

As you can see, I had to define 2 classes because as I said, I had to specify the generic arguments, because using anonymous types made the overload resolution pick another overload.

class Group
{
    public DateTime Date;
    public IEnumerable<Page> Pages;
}

class Page
{
    public int Id;
    public IEnumerable<string> Items;
}

Hope this helps.

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