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Here's the simplified parts of code that I have:

abstract class DataManager<TValue>
{
    protected static Dictionary<string, TValue> Values;
}

and then I have:

class TextManager : DataManager<string>
{
    static TextManager()
    {
        Values = ... // Fill with data
    }
}

And, now I'm getting CA1810. I see a few solutions, like making Values public and setting them elsewhere, but I don't like that, or making a static method in TextManager to do the same thing, but is invoked when the program starts, but I don't like that either.

I think it's obvious from the example, the Values should only be filled once per TValue. So, what do you think would be the best solution here?

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2  
What do you do when another class , say class AnotherTextManager : DataManager<string> comes along, and wants to initialize Values differently? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 23 '11 at 11:21
    
Sorry I didn't explain I won't need that... I just need managers for strings, integers and List<T> of those those two... I didn't think there was need to go into deeper detail. –  avance70 Feb 23 '11 at 11:27
1  
but how is the compiler meant to know that? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 23 '11 at 11:31
    
So... is there something I could do to make the compiler "understand"? :) I'm not saying my code is good, any suggestion is welcome... the remaining code of DataManager is irrelevant, it works with the Values field, while TextManager has a few string-specific methods. –  avance70 Feb 23 '11 at 11:35
    
you could also make your property not static and making your TextManager a singleton (or better yet, if you're using a IOC container, your TextManager can be a regular class instantiated in a singleton scope) –  Paolo Falabella Feb 23 '11 at 22:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

EDIT: I would turn off the rule. The thing is, you have a rule that (AFAIK) is designed to warn you about the potential performance hit of using a static constructor. I would say that initialization of a static property can be done either via a static constructor or inline (as suggested by MSDN). In your case you can't do it inline because:

  1. you only have the actual values in the subclass
  2. there's no such thing as an abstract static method, so you can't delegate the actual inline initialization to TextManager.

So that leaves the static constructor option, which basically means turning off the rule (which means "yes, Microsoft. I know this might be dangerous for performance, but I know what I'm doing").

MSDN states: "It is safe to suppress a warning from this rule if performance is not a concern; or if global state changes that are caused by static initialization are expensive or must be guaranteed to occur before a static method of the type is called or an instance of the type is created."

=======================================================================

Try this (warning: tested on Mono 2.6.7, not .NET):

abstract class DataManager<TValue>
{
    protected static Dictionary<string, TValue> Values=new Dictionary<string, TValue>();
}

class TextManager : DataManager<string>
{
    static TextManager()
    {
        Values.Add("test","test");
    }

    public static string test()
    {
        return Values["test"];
    }
}

class IntManager : DataManager<int>
{
    static IntManager()
    {
        Values.Add("test",1);
    }

    public static int test()
    {
        return Values["test"];
    }   
}

public static void Main (string[] args)
{
    Console.WriteLine(IntManager.test());    
    Console.WriteLine(TextManager.test());    
}
share|improve this answer
    
Code analysis still reports CA1810 here :) –  avance70 Feb 23 '11 at 11:31
    
@avance70: edited the answer. I would just turn off the warning (since it's basically warning you exactly against what you're trying to do) –  Paolo Falabella Feb 23 '11 at 13:04

Code analysis warnings are just that, warnings intended to flag potential issues. If you have a good reason to do what you do, then do it.

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